Tag Archives: New York City

Historic Buildings: Far Rockaway Fire House, Police Station


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Firehouse, Engine Companies 264 & 328

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has recently designated two historic buildings in Far Rockaway, Queens as individual landmarks: the Firehouse, Engine Companies 264 & 328/Hook and Ladder 134 at 16-15 Central Avenue, and the 53rd (now 101st) Precinct Police Station at 16-12 Mott Avenue.

These buildings are outstanding examples of early-20th century civic buildings and represent a period of significant growth in Far Rockaway. Continue reading

NYC Landmarks Commission Offers Permit Web Map


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The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has announced the launch of the new Permit Application Finder, an interactive web map that will allow the public to see geographically where LPC permits have been filed and issued and what that work entails.

The Commission has also enhanced its online Permit Application Search, which now gives the public the ability to search by community district and work type. Continue reading

New Historical Fiction: New York 1609


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new york 1609A new novel of historical fiction, New York 1609 (Phoozl, LLC, 2018) by Harald Johnson tells a story of the birth of New York City (and its centerpiece island, Manhattan) from its earliest beginnings.

Based on true events, New York 1609 spans the crucial years 1609–1644, which firmly planted the seeds of commerce, finance, and culture that continue to this day for the world’s first megacity. Continue reading

Colonial New York City and Its Culture


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Joyce Goodfriend, a professor of history at the University of Denver and author of Who Should Rule at Home? Confronting the Elite in British New York City (Cornell University Press, 2017), helps us investigate how early New Yorkers established and negotiated the culture of their city between 1664 and 1776. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/185

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Coney Island Boardwalk Designated Landmark


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coney island boardwalkThe New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has designated the Coney Island (Riegelmann) Boardwalk in Brooklyn a Scenic Landmark in recognition of its cultural and historical significance.

Since opening on May 15, 1923, the Coney Island Boardwalk has been one of the best-known waterfront promenades in the world, providing access to the beach, amusements, and ocean views. Scenic landmark designation is expected to protect the boardwalk’s presence along the beachfront and preserve this iconic site for future generations. Continue reading

Anthony Comstock, Censorship and Obscenity


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lust on trialAmy Werbel’s new book Lust on Trial: Censorship and the Rise of American Obscenity in the Age of Anthony Comstock (Columbia University Press, 2018) takes a look at Anthony Comstock, America’s first professional censor.

In Lust on Trial, Werbel presents a colorful journey through Comstock’s career that doubles as a new history of post–Civil War America’s risqué visual and sexual culture.

Born into a puritanical New England community, Anthony Comstock moved to New York in 1868 armed with his Christian faith and a burning desire to rid the city of vice.

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Broadway: A History of New York City in Thirteen Miles


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broadway bookFran Leadon’s new book Broadway: A History of New York City in Thirteen Miles (W. W. Norton & Co, 2018) takes a mile-by-mile look at Broadway that traces the gradual evolution of the seventeenth-century’s Brede Wegh, a muddy cow path in a backwater Dutch settlement, to the twentieth century’s Great White Way.

Readers can learn why one side of the street was once considered more fashionable than the other; view construction of the Ansonia Apartments, Trinity Church, and the Flatiron Building and the burning of P. T. Barnum’s American Museum; and discover that Columbia University was built on the site of an insane asylum. Continue reading

New Book On 1968 Columbia Student Protests


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a time to stirPaul Cronin’s new book, A Time to Stir: Columbia ’68, (Columbia University Press, 2018) reflects upon the 50th anniversary of the Columbia University student uprising and the legacies of the 1960s.

For seven days in April 1968, students occupied five buildings on the campus of Columbia University to protest a planned gymnasium in a nearby Harlem park, links between the university and the Vietnam War, and what they saw as the university’s unresponsive attitude toward their concerns. Continue reading