Tag Archives: Art History

Art of the Americas Traveling Exhibits Planned


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Expulsion from the Garden of eden The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) has announced a partnership with Fenimore Art Museum and three additional museums in the Northeast to share works from its Art of the Americas collection through the new Terra-Art Bridges program, made possible by a grant of nearly $2 million awarded by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Curators from the MFA will collaborate with colleagues from these museums to co-organize a series of traveling exhibitions over the next six years, drawing on the combined breadth and depth of the museums’ holdings and encouraging engagement with American art within different communities. The project will launch in 2018, with Fenimore being the first museum to exhibit artwork derived from the collaboration. Continue reading

New Endowed Curator of American Indian Art at Fenimore


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Feather headdressFenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York has received a gift of $2.5 million from the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

The gift will fund the principal curatorial position of the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art as well as to create a new fund for special projects related to the collection.

In recognition of the gift, the position has been named the Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator of American Indian Art. Present curator Eva Fognell, who has managed the collection since 2002, will assume the new title immediately. The curatorship is the first endowed position in the museum’s history. Continue reading

19th Century Wood-Block Prints at Albany Institute


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woodblock print by Utagawa Hiroshige courtesy of Reading Public MuseumThe Albany Institute of History & Art has opened “Along the Eastern Road: Hiroshige’s Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido,” a traveling exhibition organized by the Reading Public Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania. The exhibition, which features over fifty historic wood-block prints, runs through June 10, 2018.

The exhibition features 55 wood-block prints by Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797-1858), recording the scenic views along the famous “Eastern Road” that linked Edo (now Tokyo) with Kyoto, the ancient imperial capital of Japan. This popular series, known as the Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Road, was published in 1834 and established Hiroshige’s reputation as an artist of the topographical landscape. Continue reading

John White Alexander: An American Artist


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john white alexander bookMary Anne Goley’s new book John White Alexander: An American Artist in the Gilded Age (Philip Wilson Publishers, 2018) is an illustrated history of celebrated American artist John White Alexander that includes 90 color and black-and-white illustrations.

At the time of his death, the Pittsburgh-born John White Alexander (1856-1915) was an internationally-recognized portrait painter, on a par with his contemporaries John Singer Sargent and William Merrit Chase. However, the works that have earned him even greater acclaim than his portraits are his figure paintings of femmes fatales, usually richly attired in flowing dresses and striking elaborate poses. Continue reading

Lecture: Albany’s 1945 ‘Negro Artist Comes of Age’ Exhibit


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On Sunday at 2 pm Stephen J. Tyson will give a lecture on the Albany Institute of History & Art’s landmark 1945 exhibition The Negro Artist Comes of Age. The lecture is open to the public and is included with museum admission.

The Negro Artist Comes of Age was organized in 1945 under the leadership of the Albany Institute of History & Art’s John Davis Hatch Jr., with assistance from artist and professor Hale Woodruff.

The March 4th slide-lecture presentation will examine selected artists and works, aspects of the broader historical context that informed the development of these works, and the overall cultural significance and legacy of the exhibition. Continue reading

Brooklyn Museum Presenting ‘One Basquiat’


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Jean-Michel Basquiat (American, 1960-1988). Untitled, 1982.The Brooklyn Museum has announced the first museum exhibition of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled” is set to show in the Museum’s Robert E. Blum Gallery from January 26 through March 11, 2018.

Created in 1982, a breakout year in Basquiat’s meteoric career, “Untitled” is emblematic of his early success and ranks among the artist’s most powerful paintings.

One Basquiat is just the latest of many links between the artist and the borough – from his birth at Brooklyn Hospital, to childhood visits to the Brooklyn Museum, where his mother enrolled him as a Junior Member when he was six years old, to the Museum’s retrospective Basquiat in 2005 and its critically acclaimed presentation Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks in 2015. Continue reading

Major Thomas Cole Exhibit Planned For The Met


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View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Mass, after a thunderstorm, by thomas coleA new Thomas Cole exhibition entitled Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings is opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 30, 2018 and traveling to the National Gallery, London in June 2018.

Thomas Cole’s Journey is curated by Elizabeth Kornhauser, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor in the History of Art, Yale University, and Christopher Riopelle, Curator of Post 1800 Paintings, National Gallery, London. Continue reading

Beauty In The City: The Ashcan School


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beauty in the cityRobert A. Slayton’s new book Beauty In The City: The Ashcan School (SUNY Press, 2017) takes a look back to the beginning of the twentieth century, when the Ashcan School of Art blazed onto the art scene, introducing a revolutionary vision of New York City.

In contrast to the elite artists who painted the upper class bedecked in finery, in front of magnificent structures, or the progressive reformers who photographed the city as a slum, hopeless and full of despair, the Ashcan School held the unique belief that the industrial working-class city was a fit subject for great art.

Beauty in the City illustrates how these artists portrayed the working classes with respect and gloried in the drama of the subways and excavation sites, the office towers, and immigrant housing. Their art captured the emerging metropolis in all its facets, with its potent machinery and its class, ethnic, and gender issues. Continue reading

Pets of Historic Cherry Hill Event August 19th


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On Saturday, August 19th, Historic Cherry Hill will present the 2nd annual The Pets of Cherry Hill event, from 1 to 4 pm.

Participants are invited to imagine Cherry Hill over a century ago, at the time of the “Bunnie Society,” at this free, all-ages event. The event is based on the “Bunnie Papers,” a collection of children’s artwork, stories, and business-related materials which chronicle the fifth generation’s fascinating garden and agricultural club activities, from the late 1890’s through 1903. Lovingly gathered and named by their mother, Van Rensselaer descendant and Cherry Hill matriarch Catherine Rankin, the collection includes genealogies of dozens of rabbits, chickens, and other pets who made up the imaginary world successively dubbed a “kingdom,” then “republic,” and finally a “society.” Continue reading

Building Community in Schools, Museums, Historic Sites & Parks


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Campaign ButtonsSpeaking in Boston in October 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt declared, “Knowledge – that is, education in its true sense – is our best protection against unreasoning prejudice and panic-making fear, whether engendered by special interests, illiberal minorities or panic-stricken leaders.”

At a time when civil discourse and mutual respect can be hard to come by, FDR’s thinking about education inspired the teachers and other educators who planned this year’s Teaching the Hudson Valley institute.

Building Community with Place-Based Learning will be held July 25th to the 27th at the Henry Wallace Education and Visitor Center on the grounds of the Franklin Roosevelt Home and Presidential Library in Hyde Park and sites throughout the Valley.​ ​The program includes more than 15 workshops and five all-day field experiences.  Continue reading