Tag Archives: AmRev

Terror on the Hudson: The Burning of Kingston


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General John BurgoyneTerrorism has been a grim feature of our time, but the tactic is far from new. The Revolutionary War, like every war, was marked by wanton violence. One of the cruelest incidents came in October 1777 when the British attacked the city of Kingston, then the capital of New York State.

A massive enemy invasion in 1776 had driven patriot forces from New York City. The delegates who were in the process of writing a state constitution moved away from the fighting, first to White Plains, then to Fishkill. Continue reading

Am Revolution Seminar at Fort Ticonderoga Call for Papers


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fort ticonderogaFort Ticonderoga has announced they are seeking proposals for the Sixteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution to be held Friday-Sunday, September 20-22, 2019.

The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks proposals for new research on this critical period of the 18th century from a variety of perspectives and participants. Established scholars, graduate students, and others are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers broadly addressing the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the War for American Independence. Coordinators are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international nature of the conflict, representing the variety of peoples and places involved. Continue reading

Heroes of Fishkill Day Set for May 26th


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Heroes of Fishkill flyer final 2018The Second Heroes of Fishkill Day has been set for May 26, 2018, from 9 am to 3 pm at the Rombout Rural Cemetery, 1571 Route 52 in Fishkill, NY.

Once a place where Revolutionary War soldiers were treated for injuries in the Middle Presbyterian Church that stood there until the mid-1800’s, the event will honor the 57 Women of the Revolution who are buried in the cemetery. Continue reading

Revolutionary War Camp at Night at New Windsor


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A night of Revolutionary War military drills, musket firings and other period activities has been set for Saturday, May 19th from 7 to 9:30 pm at the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site.

The New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site features authentically reconstructed log huts that were commissioned by the Town of New Windsor, New York during the Bicentennial of the American Revolution to highlight their historic property, encompassing a large portion of the 1782-83 final winter encampment of the northern Continental Army. Continue reading

Culper Ring: Washington’s Spy Letters


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long island history project logoThe Culper Spy Ring has taken hold of the public imagination in recent years. From the work of historian Alexander Rose to the AMC series Turn, this story of a tight-knit group of Long Island natives spying for George Washington during the Revolution provides a compelling narrative.

On the latest episode of the Long Island History Project, we take a closer look at the primary sources that help document the Culper story. Kristen Nyitray, Director of Special Collections and University Archives at Stony Brook University, and Chris Filstrup, former Dean of SBU Libraries, discuss their pursuit and acquisition of two letters by George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge about the operations of the spy ring. We also discus how the letters helped form closer ties among community groups involved in interpreting and promoting this fascinating aspect of Long Island history. Continue reading

Henry Beekman Livingston, Black Sheep of Livingston Clan


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LivingstonThe next American Revolution Round Table discussion, featuring the troubled life of Henry Beekman Livingston, has been set for Tuesday, May 8th, at 6:30 pm at Siena College.

Henry Beekman Livingston was already well on his way to being the black sheep of the illustrious Livingston family before the Revolutionary War erupted.

The war seemed to be his chance to make right, and he experienced a great deal of success on the battlefield eventually earning the rank of Colonel of the 4th New York Regiment.  Continue reading

The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale and Moses Dunbar


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In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore answers to these questions about how and why Americans chose to support the sides they did during the American Revolution, by looking at the lives of two young soldiers from Connecticut: Moses Dunbar and Nathan Hale.

Taking us through the lives, politics, and decisions of these young men is Virginia DeJohn Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and author of The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution (Oxford Univ. Press, 2017). 
 You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/181

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The Death of Jane McCrea and Revolutionary War Opinion


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John Vanderlyn's "The Death of Jane McCrea"In Upstate New York, few tragedies have the cache of the death of Jane McCrea. In the summer of 1777, British armies were pressing southward through New York to Albany, with the goal of dividing the rebellious colonies.

On July 27, 1777 a young woman named Jane McCrea was killed in the vicinity of Fort Edward. There are conflicting stories about what happened, but most accuse Ottawa or Mohawk allies of Burgoyne in her death.

The murder of the young Loyalist bride changed the public perceptions of the war. General Gates wrote Burgoyne a scathing letter. Sir Edmund Burke, a Whig member of British Parliament, used the tragedy to rail against the Crown’s policies regarding its Indian allies.

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Governance After the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, George William Van Cleve, a researcher in law and history at the University of Seattle Law School and author of We Have Not A Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2017), takes us into the Confederation period so we can discover more about the Articles of Confederation, the government it established, and the problems that government confronted. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/179

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