Tag Archives: Adirondacks

Adirondack Historic Roadside Marker Grants Available


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pomeroy foundationThe William G. Pomeroy Foundation has announced they are now accepting 2018 applications for fully funded Historic Roadside Markers to commemorate the history of the Adirondacks, including locations in Essex, Warren, Hamilton, Saratoga, Washington, Clinton and Franklin Counties.

Municipalities and charitable 501(c)(3) organizations in New York State are welcome to apply for the Historic Roadside Marker Grants. Local historical organizations or municipal historians will often apply for the grant on behalf of property owners.

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John Casilear’s Love Affair with Lake George


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Artistry — in terms of painting, drawing, sketching, etc. — escapes me. While I admire and enjoy it, the combination of vision, creativity, and especially ability seems foreign, even though I lived with it while growing up. Through learning to read and constantly employing skills in that area, I gradually developed a certain comfort in the world of words, but none of it came to me magically, which is how I viewed the artistic capabilities of two of my siblings: without any lessons or instructions, they could just do it. Continue reading

Something BIG Was Once Afoot in the Adirondacks


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This appears to be the easiest North Country riddle ever, but humor me and give it a try anyway. What is very tall, very hairy, probably didn’t smell very good, and set tongues wagging when it was seen in the northern Adirondacks several times in early 1933? Just to be safe, take a moment and think about it. Hey, you never know — it could be a trick question. But if you’re still stumped or not certain of your answer, here’s another clue that might prove the clincher: it was known for having very large (OK … BIG) feet.

If you answered anything other than Gil Reichert, you’ve been successfully misled. No apologies here, though, for the description above fits both Reichert and your likely choice (Bigfoot) to a T. Continue reading

Adirondack Coast Museum Days 2018 Set


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Babbie Rural & Farm Learning MuseumThe Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance’s Annual Museum Days will take place Saturday and Sunday, June 16-17, 2018.

Sixteen museums and historic sites will offer free admission from 10 am to 4 pm.

Residents and visitors are encouraged to explore Clinton County’s artistic, agricultural, military, and industrial heritage through exhibits, demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Continue reading

Museum Wins Lake Placid Land Seizure Case


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adirondack experience logoOn May 3, 2018, the Appellate Division of New York State’s Supreme Court annulled the Village of Lake Placid’s effort to seize two parcels of land owned by the Adirondack Experience (formerly the Adirondack Museum).

The parcels, located at 2476-2478 Main Street in Lake Placid, were originally acquired by the museum in 2007 for the creation of a branch location, a plan which has since been put on hold. The Village proposes to erect a parking garage on the site. Continue reading

“Wild Jess” Elliott: Setting the Record Straight


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camp elliottJessie Elliott was a unique figure in the history of the Beaver River country in the west central Adirondacks. Visitors to the tiny settlement of Beaver River are still told she went to prison for her role in the bootlegging that was rampant in the lumberjack days of the early 1920s. She is listed among the “lawless ladies” in Niki Kourofsky’s recent book, Adirondack Outlaws. Pat Thompson’s memoir about life in Beaver River claims Jessie rode her steed through the settlement with her long hair flowing and a pistol in a holster on her belt. More fantastic stories about Jessie can be found in Bill Donnelly’s Short History of Beaver River where she is described, among other things, as a good-looking Calamity Jane, a bootlegger, and a prostitute. The truth underlying the legends reveals a much more complex and interesting wilderness woman. Continue reading

Herbert Short: Lost in the Boreas River Country in 1930


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In early November 1930, a hunting party in the Boreas River area split up to do what Adirondack hunters so often do: execute a deer drive. Among those taking part were Lew Buck, Leo Adams, Edward White, Murray Short, and Murray’s brother Herbert. Herb was a corrections officer who had recently been promoted and transferred to Auburn Prison from Clinton Prison in Dannemora. It was Dannemora that provided the link between him and the other men: Buck was the village’s former postmaster, White was a retired Clinton keeper, and his close friend Adams still worked there as a guard.

Concern mounted at day’s end when the men reassembled and Herbert was a no-show. But he was a very experienced woodsman, and the entire party was aware that a storm was moving into the area, so in that sense he was prepared for anything. His companions surmised he may have been turned around while trying to get back to camp before the snow fell. At that point, the explanations they considered carried reassurances that everything was OK, or soon would be. Continue reading

Profile: Adirondack Experience School Programs


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adk experience school programAdirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX, formerly the Adirondack Museum) has been offering school programs since 1976. The outreach has expanded exponentially since, now hosting off-and on-site programs free of charge to schools within the Adirondack Park.

In 2017 the Museum; visited over 55 schools in 12 counties; delivered 393 programs to classrooms; drove 10,039 miles to reach students in the ADKS and beyond; engaged with 3,069 students and teachers during field trips to the Museum; and served 8,046 students and teachers in their classrooms. Continue reading