Kid’s Day At Oneida Mansion House June 16th


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oneida community mansion houseA Kids’ Day Out event has been set for Saturday, June 16 and Sunday, June 17 at the Oneida Community Mansion House, 170 Kenwood Avenue in Oneida, NY.

Museum staff will provide the scavenger hunt information, and families can pick the clue sheet and complete the challenge anytime during museum business hours. The completed sheets can be entered in a raffle drawing to win a prize. The drawing will be done after the weekend. Continue reading

Restoration of 1720s Jean Hasbrouck House Begins


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Jean Hasbrouck House in July 2017, Phase one of the project to restore the original 18th-century roof framing of the Jean Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721) in New Paltz, at Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) has begun.

The Jean Hasbrouck House is a specific and rare example of traditional Dutch 18th-century architecture. The house’s high-pitched gable roof spans twice the depth of other stone houses from the period and is one of a kind in the United States.

The house was named a National Historic Landmark in 1967 and serves as the flagship house of seven historic house museums comprising Historic Huguenot Street’s 10-acre National Historic Landmark District (awarded 1960). Continue reading

Robert Moses and Long Island, June 10


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robert moses“The Land of Moses: Robert Moses and Modern Long Island” has been set for Sunday, June 10th at 2 pm at the Community Church of East Williston, Long Island, NY.

The speakers, Joshua Ruff and Jonathan Olly, are the co-curators of an upcoming exhibition on Robert Moses, which will open at the Long Island Museum of American Art, History & Carriages in Stony Brook on June 22. Continue reading

An Anthropologist On Oneida Community Utopia


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oneida utopiaAuthor and anthropologist Anthony Wonderley is set to give a talk on his book Oneida Utopia: A Community Searching for Human Happiness & Prosperity on Thursday, June 21 at 7 pm at the Oneida Community Mansion House.

Anthony Wonderley, Ph.D., offers a fresh and holistic look at the origins and legacy of the Oneida Community. In his new book Oneida Utopia, Wonderley argues that the commune and company together comprise a century-long narrative of economic success, innovative thinking, and abiding concern for the welfare of others. Continue reading

Burned Over District: Antirevivalist, Religous Liberty


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Lorenzo Dow and the Jerking Exercise. A program highlighting Oneida County’s significance during the Second Great Awakening has been set for Thursday, June 14th at 5:30 pm, at the Oneida County History Center in Utica.

Oneida County’s significance during the Second Great Awakening as the “burned-over district” has long been long established; however, many histories of this period and place often only consider those revivalists who welcomed evangelicalism, and have neglected those who opposed the revivals with equal fervor.

Antirevivalists, whose myriad religious beliefs earned them colorful insults and even threats from revivalists, accused evangelicals of violating their fundamental right to religious freedom. Continue reading

New York History Blog Marking 10 Years


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A recent call from the California State Library praising the work of the The New York History Blog and inquiring about how to model the blog’s successes in The Golden State, reminded me that it’s been ten years.

It couldn’t have happened without the many supporters and contributors, our long time advertiser The Adirondack Experience, and especially our longest and most generous supporter Suzanne Clary, executive director of the Jay Heritage Center. Without the generous contributions of our supporters, we simply could not have produced the most widely read publication about New York State history these long years.

In addition to keeping the state’s history community informed about new publications, newly available collections, the efforts of public history and historic preservation advocates, and notices about exhibits, events, conferences, and events, The New York History Blog has served as an important place to discuss the challenges, and I think there are some notable successes of this largely volunteer effort.  Continue reading