Category Archives: Military History

Rare American Revolution Object at Fort Ticonderoga


By on

0 Comments

cincinatti medalFort Ticonderoga has announced the public display of a rare object from the time of the nation’s founding – an original Society of the Cincinnati gold eagle medal.

The priceless Revolutionary War medal is one of two surviving examples produced in Paris in 1783 for purchase by officers of the Continental Army. The medal, which is believed to have never been viewed publicly, is on loan to Fort Ticonderoga from the Robert Nittolo Collection, a large and important private collection of 18th-century North American militaria in. Continue reading

Terror on the Hudson: The Burning of Kingston


By on

3 Comments

General John BurgoyneTerrorism has been a grim feature of our time, but the tactic is far from new. The Revolutionary War, like every war, was marked by wanton violence. One of the cruelest incidents came in October 1777 when the British attacked the city of Kingston, then the capital of New York State.

A massive enemy invasion in 1776 had driven patriot forces from New York City. The delegates who were in the process of writing a state constitution moved away from the fighting, first to White Plains, then to Fishkill. Continue reading

Decoration Day Ceremony at the Old Stone Fort


By on

0 Comments

old stone fort museum logoOn Wednesday, May 30 at 6 pm the Old Stone Fort Museum is set to host members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War for a traditional Decoration Day ceremony on the lawn of the Revolutionary War stone fort.

With the help of the public, the graves of Civil War soldiers will be decorated with flowers and the Schoharie County American Legion Honor Guard will honor veterans of America’s other wars.

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Decoration Day, now known as Memorial Day. Continue reading

New Yorkers At The Hindenburg Line in 1918


By on

1 Comment

107th Infantry RegimentWalter Allison, a graduate of Newburgh Free Academy probably did not know what hit him when wounded in the stomach on September 29, 1918. He lay in a shallow shell hole, bleeding, not far from where his commander lay mortally wounded. Two lieutenants urged the men of E Company of the 107th Infantry Regiment on, but they too were cut down, as bullets ripped through the air, shells exploded all about them wiping out an entire squad and Allison’s classmate Everett Baker. Smoke and chemical gas drifted through the air as the few remaining sergeants, corporals and privates carried on the fight, and the brutal battle to break the Hindenburg Line continued. Continue reading

Revolutionary War Camp at Night at New Windsor


By on

0 Comments

A night of Revolutionary War military drills, musket firings and other period activities has been set for Saturday, May 19th from 7 to 9:30 pm at the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site.

The New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site features authentically reconstructed log huts that were commissioned by the Town of New Windsor, New York during the Bicentennial of the American Revolution to highlight their historic property, encompassing a large portion of the 1782-83 final winter encampment of the northern Continental Army. Continue reading

Caldwell Letters From War of 1812 Now Online


By on

0 Comments

the transfer of the documents to their proper archival materials with Matthew Thorenz and Jill Moore.The Quassaick Chapter, NSDAR, and the Moffat Library of Washingtonville, NY, both located in Orange County, recently completed a year-long project to preserve and digitize a set of four letters belonging to the Caldwell family of Blooming Grove from the War of 1812 era.

The library has other letters from the family that had been previously transcribed by the Blooming Grove Town Historian, but these are the first letters to be digitized and put online for public view. Continue reading