Category Archives: History

New York History

Oneida Co Historical Hall of Fame Inductees Named


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Rear Admiral Samuel Livingston BreeseThe Oneida County Historical Hall of Fame has named five individuals to its 2018 Historical Hall of Fame inductee class: Rear Admiral Samuel Livingston Breese, Utica Public Library Director Alice Cynthia Dodge, educator Anthony Schepsis, Clinton Hockey trailblazer Edward Stanley, and Utica sports editor and enthusiast Len Wilbur.

The Hall of Famers will be inducted alongside the 2018 Richard W. Couper ‘Living Legends’ class: Oneida County Historian Joseph P. Bottini, US Navy veteran and community advocate Edward Jackson, Reverend Joseph A. Salerno, and animal rights activist Anita Vitullo. Continue reading

Lost British Forts of Long Island


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lost british forts of long islandAn evening lecture, Lost British Forts of Long Island by David Griffin, has been set for Thursday, August 23rd at 6:30 pm at the Fraunces Tavern Museum, 54 Pearl Street, New York.

When the Revolutionary War broke out and New York City had fallen in 1776, the British forces developed a network of forts along the length of Long Island to defend the New York area and create a front to Patriot forces across the Sound in Connecticut. Continue reading

Ruth Williams: A World War One Nurse Overseas


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The word hero is often tossed around loosely, but when it comes to wounded soldiers, no one argues that it’s fitting — so what does it say about someone else when wounded soldiers call them heroes? Consider American women during World War I. Although many wanted to, they didn’t have to serve because of their sex, and could support the troops by important actions at home. But some chose to place themselves near the front lines, and with no weapons to defend themselves. Their only protection came from nebulous agreements by both sides not to bomb hospitals and care centers.

That’s what nurses did, risking their lives to comfort, save the lives of, or ease the deaths of, soldiers. Which explains why so many wounded men referred to nurses as the real heroes. A fine example of that circumstance, with an unusual twist or two, involved Ruth Williams of Ogdensburg. Continue reading

Campaign Furniture: The March of Portable Design


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Collapsible armchairThe Boscobel House and Gardens has announced its 2018 exhibition, Campaign Furniture: The March of Portable Design, featuring two dozen 18th and 19th century examples that are as functional as they are elegant. Collapsible chairs, tables, beds, and more were once considered essential equipment for military officers, Hudson River School artists, and well-heeled tourists. These ingeniously designed objects document the desire for the comforts of home, even when out on the road. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Are you glad to see this weekly link list? Do your part my making a contribution to keep the New York History Blog publishing. Use the fundraising page at https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U or send a check to: New York History Blog, 7269 State Route 9, Chestertown, NY 12817 Continue reading

Albany Institute Extends Thomas Cole Exhibition


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Expulsion from the Garden of edenThe Albany Institute of History & Art has extended the run of the Thomas Cole’s Paper Trail exhibition to November 28th, 2018. The exhibit was originally scheduled to close on October 28.

In 1818, the youthful Thomas Cole emigrated from his native England to begin a new life in the United States. After several years struggling as an engraver and designer for his parents’ short-lived floor cloth and wallpaper manufactories, he embarked on a career as painter of landscapes and settled in the thriving port city of New York. There he found patrons and a welcoming audience for his works that were exhibited at the National Academy of Design and other venues. Now, during the bicentennial year of Cole’s arrival in the United States, this naturalized American artist is being publicly recognized once again at museums and historic sites on both sides of the Atlantic. Continue reading