Category Archives: African American History

Haverstraw’s African American Connections


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crossroads of rockland historyOn the June 2018 “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan welcomed Virginia Norfleet, the founder of the Haverstraw African American Connection (HAAC). This organization was instrumental in the creation of the Haverstraw African American Memorial Park and Haverstraw’s Annual Juneteenth Celebration.

Norfleet spoke about the research she has done through the HAAC to uncover the rich culture and contributions of African Americans of Haverstraw, New York, the Juneteenth Celebrations and the importance of Memorial Park. Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Women’s Rights National Park Marking Juneteenth


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Wesleyan ChapelThe Women’s Rights National Historical Park is set to commemorate Juneteenth on Friday, June 15th and Saturday, June 16th.

In the midst of The Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln declared all enslaved persons in most Southern States freed effective January 1, 1863 with The Emancipation Proclamation. Planters and other enslavers migrated to Texas to escape the fighting, subsequently greatly increasing the enslaved population there prior to the end of the Civil War. The enslaved people of Texas, most of whom were geographically isolated, were read the Emancipation Proclamation on June 19, 1865. The celebration that ensued has been known thereafter as Juneteenth. Continue reading

Historic District Designated in Central Harlem


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West 130-132nd Streets Historic DistrictThe New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has recently designated the Central Harlem – West 130-132nd Streets a Historic District. This mid-block historic district represents Central Harlem’s residential architecture, and the social, cultural, and political life of its African American population in the 20th century.

To illustrate the significance of this diverse historic district, LPC launched an interactive story map called Explore the Central Harlem – West 130th-132nd Streets Historic District. Continue reading

Black History in the Hudson Valley Conference Planned


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Conference on Black History in Hudson ValleyA conference on Black History in the Hudson Valley has been set for Saturday, July 14th, from 9 am to 5:30 pm, in Kingston.

Hosted by the Hudson River Maritime Museum and The Library at the A.J. Williams-Myers African Roots Center, the focus of this conference is the history of Black and African-American residents in the Hudson Valley, including communities and work along the canals and tributaries of the Hudson River. Continue reading

The Value of Slaves from Womb to Grave


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What did it mean to be a person and to also be a commodity in early America?

We can’t really understand the history of early America unless we also grapple with the institution of slavery because the two were so intertwined.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast,  Daina Ramey Berry, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas, Austin and author of The Price For Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation (Beacon Press, 2017), takes us behind the scenes of her research so we can explore how early Americans valued and commodified enslaved men, women, and children. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/176

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Lecture: Albany’s 1945 ‘Negro Artist Comes of Age’ Exhibit


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On Sunday at 2 pm Stephen J. Tyson will give a lecture on the Albany Institute of History & Art’s landmark 1945 exhibition The Negro Artist Comes of Age. The lecture is open to the public and is included with museum admission.

The Negro Artist Comes of Age was organized in 1945 under the leadership of the Albany Institute of History & Art’s John Davis Hatch Jr., with assistance from artist and professor Hale Woodruff.

The March 4th slide-lecture presentation will examine selected artists and works, aspects of the broader historical context that informed the development of these works, and the overall cultural significance and legacy of the exhibition. Continue reading

Colonial Port Cities and Slavery


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ben_franklins_worldThe histories of early North America and the Caribbean are intimately intertwined. The same European empires we encounter in our study of early America also appear in the Caribbean. The colonies of these respective empires often traded goods, people, and ideas between each other.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Marisa Fuentes, an associate professor of history and women and gender studies at Rutgers University and author of Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), joins us to explore some of the connections mainland North America and the British Caribbean shared in their practices of slavery in urban towns. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/173

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