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Have You Supported The New York History Blog This Year?


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We just wrote another check for IT services and it was a reminder to reach out again to our readers for help in keeping The New York History Blog publishing for another year.

You can make contributions by check, or online at: https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U

Your contribution today makes it possible for us to daily provide news and information for the history community.

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Utopia: The Village of Modern Times


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Among_the_Pines_Brentwood_NYOne spring morning, readers of the New York Tribune opened the paper to discover the surprising news that Utopia had appeared overnight. Where inequality, strife, turmoil, mutual hatred, and oppression had previously ruled over human history, in this new place, men and women were said to be, even now, living together in a state of peace, harmony, and equity.

Readers were surprised, even disbelieving. Others, who had followed certain hints and implications, wondered if this might be, perhaps, the fulfillment of certain obscure promises by the great reformers of the day: the Greeleys, the Ballous, the Comtes. Continue reading

Sally Roesch Wagner: The Rest of the Suffrage Story


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bloomerSally Roesch Wagner PhD, Founder and Executive Director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center for Social Justice Dialogue in Fayetteville NY, will be the final speaker for the Peterboro Women’s History Weekend at 1:30 on Sunday, September 24 at the Smithfield Community Center in Peterboro NY.

Dr. Wagner’s program will culminate a weekend of activities related to women’s suffrage, dress reform, and the 19th C. “domestic sphere” in commemoration of the Centennial of NYS Women’s Suffrage.

Wagner will present The Rest of the Story of the Suffrage Movement which relates to Matilda Joslyn Gage’s and Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s position in 1880 on women’s voting. These two co-leaders of the National Woman Suffrage Association were beginning to see differently than Susan B. Anthony, the third co-leader of the organization. Anthony believed the movement should concentrate on getting women the vote. Gage contended that women already had the right to vote – that in a system based on the consent of the governed, the government just needed to protect the right to exercise citizenship, not “give” the right. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Fall for History in Malone: Good Old Fashioned Family Fun


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frankin county historical & museum societyThe Franklin County Historical and Museum Society will hold its Fall for History event on September 23 from noon to 4 pm.

This year’s theme is “Good Old Fashioned Family Fun.” The event will occur, rain or shine, at The House of History located at 51 Milwaukee St. in Malone.

Admission is free and there will be activities for all ages. Local Historical Societies from Saranac Lake, Ft. Covington, Chateaugay, Constable and Bellmont will be present. Continue reading

Jay Day: Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures


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the sea is not full book coverThe Jay Heritage Center will host a talk and Q & A with Charlie Doane, Cruising Editor of SAIL Magazine, the largest sailing magazine in the US as he shares chapters and personal experiences from his newest book, The Sea is Not Full – Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures on Friday, September 22, at 6:30 pm.

Charlie has completed seven transatlantic voyages, including most recently a voyage from France to New England aboard his new boat Lunacy. His other voyages include singlehanded passages between New England and the Caribbean; he has also competed in several distance races, including the Newport-Bermuda Race, the Fastnet Race and the Sydney-Hobart Race. He is one of many accomplished sailors and descendants of New York Yacht Club co-founder, John Clarkson Jay.

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Defining the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhat do we mean by the American Revolution?

How do we define it? Was it a war? Was it a movement? Was it a series of movements?

The Doing History: To the Revolution! series seeks to explore not just the history of the American Revolution, but the histories of the American Revolution. In this episode of the series on the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we undertake the difficult task of trying to define the American Revolution by going behind-the-scenes of the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia.

You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/151

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Solomon Northup Class Planned For SUNY Adirondack


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Solomon Northup in a Sketch from Twelve Years a SlaveThis October, a class offered through SUNY Adirondack’s Continuing Education division will provide details on the life of Solomon Northup. Northup was a free black man who was kidnapped from Saratoga Springs, New York in 1841, and sold into slavery.

Following his release in 1853, Northup penned a narrative, Twelve Years a Slave, which was the basis for the Academy Award winning film, 12 Years a Slave. The title of the class is “The Real Solomon Northup from 12 Years a Slave,” and the instructor is local author David Fiske. Continue reading

NYC Lecture: World War One and Modern Veteran Care


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Disabled World War One veteran pan handling Unknown photographer, Um Spenden bittender Kriegsinvalide, Germany, after 1918 - source Deutsches Historisches MuseumThe New York Academy of Medicine in New York City will host a lecture by Beth Linker on The Great War and Modern Veteran Care on Thursday, September 28 from 6 to 7:30 pm.

Popularly known as “The War to End All Wars,” the First World War was also the war to end all disability. Determined to curtail the human and economic costs of military conflict, the United States and many other belligerent nations instituted programs of physical and vocational rehabilitation in order to make injured men more whole again, so that they could fit back more seamlessly into civilian society.

This talk will trace the practice and ethic of the rehabilitative model of veteran care, with an eye toward showing how it later became commodified as part of America’s ongoing commitment to pursuing a militaristic foreign policy.  Continue reading