Schoharie County Historical Spring Meeting at Lansing Manor


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lansing manorThe annual Spring Program Meeting of the Schoharie County Historical Society will be held on Thursday, April 27, at 7 pm at the New York Power Authority’s Visitors Center in North Blenheim. The public is invited to attend the meeting and visit the Lansing Manor House afterward.

Historical Society Director Carle Kopecky will introduce the Society’s new Director of Educational Outreach Melinda McTaggart, who will now manage the Lansing Manor operations among other duties. Continue reading

340th Anniversary of New Paltz Land Agreement


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huguenot street wigwamHistoric Huguenot Street has announced that it is constructing a replica Munsee Native American wigwam to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the signing of the 1677 land agreement between the Munsee Esopus sachems and the Huguenot Refugees.

The land agreement provided for the 12 Huguenot founders to “purchase” nearly 40,000 acres of land in the lower Wallkill Valley. The village that developed within the borders of this land is now known as New Paltz. Continue reading

Historical Collections Supplies Grants Available


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cnap supplies programGreater Hudson Heritage Network and New York Council on the Arts have announced the portal to apply for the first cycle of the new NYSCA/GHHN Collection Needs Assessment Program (CNAP) – Supplies Grant is now open. Applicants who have consulted with an appropriate professional may request funds to purchase collections management supplies. Supplies may include, but are not limited to: storage boxes, acid-free tissue paper, artifact trays, dividers, UV filtering film, Tyvek sheeting, tape, tags, labels, and environmental monitors, etc. Supply requests for archival or library collections will not be supported. Maximum award is $750. Continue reading

Ultimate Rift: Evolution in Women’s Suffrage Movement


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helen martinSchoharie Crossing State Historic Site will host Helen Martin on April 25th at 6:30 pm to present, “The Ultimate Rift: Evolution within the Women’s Suffrage Movement.” Martin will discuss the evolution in the movement and the role of Johnstown native Elizabeth Cady Stanton in securing women the right to vote.

The presentation will focus on suffrage efforts and the ultimate rift between the “old guard” and the younger generation of suffragists who became involved. It will cover how women in New York gained suffrage three years before the entire nation did, and this program will discuss the attention paid to as well as credit given to the younger group at that time; partially because so many of the “old guard” had passed away prior to the passage of suffrage in NY State in 1917. Continue reading

Pinkster Celebration at Fort Crailo Saturday


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pinkster celebrationOn April 22, 2017 from 11 am to 4 pm, Crailo State Historic Site will host a Pinkster celebration featuring the performance and education group, The Children of Dahomey.

Once a Dutch holiday commemorating Pentecost, Pinkster became a distinctly African American holiday in the Hudson River Valley during the colonial era. During the 17th and 18th centuries, enslaved and free African Americans transformed Pinkster from a Dutch religious observance into a spring festival and a celebration of African cultural traditions. All along the Hudson River and on Albany’s “Pinkster Hill” (the current site of the NYS Capitol), enslaved African Americans reunited with family and friends and celebrated Pinkster with storytelling, food, music, and dance. Other Pinkster traditions, like the selection of the Pinkster King, created opportunities for enslaved African Americans to honor respected members of the community and to subtly mock their white enslavers. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Adirondack Spruce Gum was Once a Hot Commodity


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All this talk from me during the last two weeks about spruce-related subjects (Sprucelets and spruce beer) is linked to past conversations with my mom, a native of Churubusco in northern Clinton County. It’s officially known as the Town of Clinton, but to local folks, it’s just Busco — and about as country as it gets around here. Growing up there on a farm in the 1920s and ’30s, Mom partook in things that were once the norm, like drinking raw milk and chewing spruce gum.

Her repeated mention of loving to chew spruce gum intrigued me. But as a young boy, I made the mistake of thinking any old evergreen would do, so I tried white-pine sap, something I still regret to this day. Maybe it doesn’t actually taste terrible, but in my recollection, it was terribly terrible, like turpentine. To avoid steering anyone away from it based on an old memory, I confirmed through our state DEC website and others that white-pine resin can be used to make turpentine. And the higher the pitch level, the stronger the turpentine taste — so my memory is good that the taste of raw pine resin was awful. Continue reading

New York 1925-35 And Modernized America


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Manhattan Cocktail Service The exhibition Roaring into the Future: New York 1925-35, on view June 18 through October 9 at Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art, is an exhibition celebrating the Empire State as the driving force behind the creation of 20th-century modernism.

From Buffalo to Brooklyn, artists, designers, and manufacturers generated avant-garde art, fashion, technology, and music that resulted in the century’s most important artistic revolution. Continue reading

Make-Do’s: Curiously Repaired Antiques Exhibit


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Agateware jug, mid-19th century with later alterationsBoscobel House and Gardens’ will hold Make-Do’s: Curiously Repaired Antiques, from June 3rd to October 1st, a major exhibition focused on historic attempts to reduce, reuse, and recycle.

Make-dos include everyday household remnants, such as porcelain teapots with silver replacement spouts and or tin handles. They also include treasured relics, such as a decanter riddled with staples that was once owned by Washington Irving. More than 100 examples will be drawn from local, private and public collections.  Continue reading