Are You Doing Your Part?


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Every day The New York History Blog delivers news of the history community, stories from New York’s history, and information about the latest conferences, new publications, and podcasts.

We can’t do it without your support. In 2017 we paid out $1,795 more than we took in. Help us make up the difference by making a contribution today via our Rally.org page, or by sending a check to:

The New York History Blog
7269 State Route 9
Chestertown, NY 12817

Thanks to all of you who help keep the site going.

Culper Ring: Washington’s Spy Letters


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long island history project logoThe Culper Spy Ring has taken hold of the public imagination in recent years. From the work of historian Alexander Rose to the AMC series Turn, this story of a tight-knit group of Long Island natives spying for George Washington during the Revolution provides a compelling narrative.

On the latest episode of the Long Island History Project, we take a closer look at the primary sources that help document the Culper story. Kristen Nyitray, Director of Special Collections and University Archives at Stony Brook University, and Chris Filstrup, former Dean of SBU Libraries, discuss their pursuit and acquisition of two letters by George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge about the operations of the spy ring. We also discus how the letters helped form closer ties among community groups involved in interpreting and promoting this fascinating aspect of Long Island history. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Are you glad to see this weekly link list? Do your part my making a contribution to keep the New York History Blog publishing. Use the fundraising page at https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U or send a check to: New York History Blog, 7269 State Route 9, Chestertown, NY 12817
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Jawonio: 70 Years With People With Special Needs


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crossroads of rockland historyOn this month’s on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan explored the new exhibition at the Historical Society of Rockland County: “Jawonio: Moving Forward, Looking Back – Changing Lives of People with Special Needs for 70 Years” with Diana Hess (Chief Development Officer at Jawonio).

“Jawonio” is a Native American word that means “independence.” Founded in Rockland County in 1947 as the Rockland County Center for the Physically Handicapped & United Cerebral Palsy, Jawonio today is at the forefront of providing services that help people of all ages with special needs reach their potential and achieve independence.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Humanities NY Upcoming Webinars, Workshop


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Humanities New York will host two webinars and a workshop to support new applicants for their upcoming Action Grants.

Action Grants offer up to $5,000 to produce public-facing humanities projects that encourage audiences to reflect on their values, explore new ideas, and engage with others across New York State.

The grants require organizations to demonstrate a match of at least one-to-one. The deadline to apply for Action Grants is June 1st, 2018. Continue reading

Henry Beekman Livingston, Black Sheep of Livingston Clan


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LivingstonThe next American Revolution Round Table discussion, featuring the troubled life of Henry Beekman Livingston, has been set for Tuesday, May 8th, at 6:30 pm at Siena College.

Henry Beekman Livingston was already well on his way to being the black sheep of the illustrious Livingston family before the Revolutionary War erupted.

The war seemed to be his chance to make right, and he experienced a great deal of success on the battlefield eventually earning the rank of Colonel of the 4th New York Regiment.  Continue reading

Champlain Canal Centennial Roundtables Planned


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lakes to locks passageFour roundtables celebrating the Champlain Canal Centennial have been set for May, each will feature a presentation, an information sharing session, networking opportunities, and a discussion period.

The roundtables are designed to bring together museum professionals, historical societies, archivists, local historians, and community members to foster collaboration and to create unique thematic experiences for visitors. Continue reading

The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale and Moses Dunbar


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ben_franklins_world

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore answers to these questions about how and why Americans chose to support the sides they did during the American Revolution, by looking at the lives of two young soldiers from Connecticut: Moses Dunbar and Nathan Hale.

Taking us through the lives, politics, and decisions of these young men is Virginia DeJohn Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and author of The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution (Oxford Univ. Press, 2017). 
 You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/181

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Sailing History At Jay Heritage Center May 16th


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the new york yacht clubAuthor John Rousmaniere is set to give a lecture on American sailing history on May 16th at 7 pm at the Jay Heritage Center.

John Rousmaniere’s 30 books range over a world of topics, but he is best known for writing about sailing in all its facets – including seamanship, storms, sailing safety, the America’s Cup, and stories of America’s yacht clubs, including the New York Yacht Club, where he is club historian. His illustrated talk is about what he calls “The Golden Pastime.” Continue reading