Tag Archives: Tourism

NY History and Upstate Tourism Development Awards


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REDC RegionsThis post brings to a conclusion the series on the awards granted by the Regional Economic Development Councils in December 2014. The purpose of the series is to provide the history community with information about what actually is occurring in New York State funding.

It provides readers of these posts with the opportunity to draw on the primary source documents about what really is being done. It examines furthermore what Empire State Development is doing with the new money it has received and to determine if the Path through History has substance. Continue reading

REDC Awards Nurture Infrastructure, Ignore History


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REDC RegionsThis post is part of a continuing series on discerning the actual policies of New York State regarding promoting history by following the money it awards through the Regional Economic Development Council (REDC) process.

The focus in this post is on where the State awards money in support of cooperation and collaboration. In other words, the awards here aren’t for a specific event or site but are more sweeping in scope. They seek to support multiple organizations and entities working together on behalf of a larger goal than any one group could achieve on its own. There are lessons to be learned here for the history community which is not the recipient of any of these awards. Continue reading

The REDC’s Art Tourism Funding


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REDC RegionsThis is the seventh in a series of posts on the awards granted by the Regional Economic Development Councils (REDC). The Path through History received short shrift in the awards process, but there were history-related awards nonetheless.

These awards tended to be issued by the New York States Council on the Arts and the New York State Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) in accordance with policies created before Path through History was launched. In this post, we focus on the awards for another type of tourism: Art Tourism. Continue reading

Norm Bollen On Promoting Mohawk Valley History


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features Norm Bollen of Fort Plain Museum discussing formation of the Mohawk Country Heritage Association. The association is promoting eight American Revolution-era historic sites in western Montgomery County. The initial start-up group includes the Fort Plain Museum, Fort Klock, Isaac Paris House, Nellis Tavern, Van Alstyne Homestead, Stone Arabia Church, Palatine Church and the Margaret Reaney Library, all within minutes of Thruway Exit 29 in Canajoharie. Listen at “The Historians” online archive at http://www.bobcudmore.com/thehistorians/
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REDC’s Recreation Tourism Funding


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REDC RegionsThis post is the sixth in a series on the awards granted by the Regional Economic Development Councils. The series is intended to document what actually is being done, by following the money.

Empire State Development – Market New York (ESD MNY) is part of a new process applicants for state funding negotiate. ESD MNY has funded Path through History media projects, support for booze-related tourism, and some projects with “path” potential (although they weren’t identified as such). In this post, I’ll focus on another type of tourism touted by Governor Andrew Cuomo: recreation tourism. Continue reading

2015 Museums Conference Keynote Speakers Set


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MANY LogoThe Museum Association of New York (MANY) has announced the keynote speakers for the 2015 Museums in Action Conference, being held in Corning, NY from Sunday, April 12th to Tuesday, April 14th.

The 2015 conference theme is “Museums Mean Business”. Locally, statewide and across the country, museums help drive the economy. The scope of their impact is varied and wide, and includes audiences from all ranges of income and education. Tourists, local community members and school children are only a few of the groups that frequent museums on a daily basis. Each year nationally, more people visit museums than attend all professional sporting events and theme parks combined! Museums provide jobs, education and community spaces, and are a major attraction for tourism dollars. Continue reading

Local History And The Power of Place


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teaching geographyThere is lots of discussion these days about the “power of place” – the importance of geography and the influence of locales and surroundings. The concept dovetails naturally with local history, which explores the historical development of communities.

New York is in an excellent position to explore the connection between the power of place and local history. Our state has hundreds of local historical societies and other public history programs and is the only state in the nation with officially designated local historians. Continue reading

An Update On The Finger Lakes Museum


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Finger Lakes MuseumIn December, The Finger Lakes Museum was awarded two New York State agency grants through Round IV of the Regional Economic Development Council Initiative. The awards totaled $254,500.

In two separate letters to museum board President John Adamski, Empire State Development President and CEO Kenneth Adams wrote that the Finger Lakes Regional Council had recommended a $200,000 grant award for capital construction work at the museum’s campus in Branchport and an additional $54,500 through its Division of Tourism for marketing and promotion through the state’s I Love New York program. Continue reading

19th Century NYC Travelers Talk, Exhibit


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Hooker's Map (showing places of interest)The Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden will host a lunchtime lecture about James Stuart and other travelers to New York City, this Friday, January 9th at 12:30 pm.

James Stuart was a guest at the Mount Vernon Hotel during his stay in New York City in 1833. His travel diary attracted considerable attention for the generally positive reviews he offered on American society compared with his British contemporaries. Continue reading