Tag Archives: Theodore Roosevelt

Roosevelt Elk Herd Installation at Sagamore Hill


By on

0 Comments

Roosevelt Elk Herd Installation An aluminum Roosevelt Elk Herd Installation has arrived at Sagamore Hill after a long journey from Olympic National Park, the home to the largest unmanaged herd of Roosevelt elk in the Pacific Northwest.

In 1893, Chief of Mammalogy for the USDA, C. Hart Merriam, was joined by Theodore Roosevelt at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. As they examined the displayed heads of several of elk native to the area of the Olympic Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, Roosevelt identified for Merriam the characteristics that made it unique from the more common Plains elk.

Continue reading

Oyster Bay Railroad Station Restoration Tour Nov 4th


By on

0 Comments

Theodore Roosevelt departing the historic Oyster Bay Railroad Station circa 1900The Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities (SPLIA) has partnered with the Historic Oyster Bay Railroad Station to organize a behind-the-scenes tour on Saturday, November 4 from 2 to 4 pm.

The tour will take a behind-the-scenes look at the ongoing restoration of the historic station once used by President Theodore Roosevelt to travel between his residence at Sagamore Hill and Washington D.C. Continue reading

Independence Day Celebration at Sagamore Hill July 4th


By on

0 Comments

theodore rooseveltSagamore Hill NHS is providing day-long outdoor activities on Tuesday, July 4th, free and open to the public.

Attendees will see history come alive as Theodore Roosevelt, performed by Joe Wiegand, along with other family friendly activities offered from 11 am to 4 pm.

At 2 pm, the main program will begin with speeches and a performance from the Calliope Brass Band.

There will be an equestrian reenactment of the First United States Volunteer Cavalry Regiment, “The Rough Riders,” including a call for recruits where young volunteers will receive their enlistment papers. Continue reading

Roosevelt in Maine: 19th Century Work and Masculinity


By on

0 Comments

The Oneida Community Mansion House will host a discussion with historian Jason Newton about popular 19th century attitudes about work and masculinity entitled Teddy Roosevelt Among the Lumberjacks, on Sunday, May 7, at 1 pm.

Newton will examine Theodore Roosevelt’s early adult experiences in the Maine woods and at Harvard in a discussion of urban elites’ views of masculinity. Ideas about “ruggedness” shaped everything from immigration policy to imperialism, while rejecting what was considered feminine. Continue reading

True Flag: TR, Twain, and the Birth of American Empire


By on

0 Comments

the true flag book coverRevealing a piece of forgotten history, Stephen Kinzer looks back to the dawn of the twentieth century, when the United States first found itself with the chance to dominate faraway lands in his new book The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire (Henry Holt and Co., 2017).

How should the United States act in the world? No matter how often the question is debated, none of what we say is original. Every argument is a pale shadow of the first and greatest debate, which erupted more than a century ago. Its themes resurface every time Americans argue whether to intervene in a foreign country. That prospect thrilled some Americans. It horrified others. Their debate gripped the nation. Continue reading

Boomtown: Oyster Bay During the TR Era


By on

0 Comments

roosevelt save your parkThe Thirteenth Annual Dr. John A. Gable Lecture Series, sponsored by the Friends of Sagamore Hill, continues on Thursday, March 30, with “Boomtown: Oyster Bay During the Theodore Roosevelt Era.” In his lecture, Park Ranger Scott Gurney of Sagamore Hill National Historic Site will discuss how technological advances in transportation, communication, and lifestyle at the turn of the 20th century — combined with the popularity of Theodore Roosevelt — transformed Oyster By from a quiet country town into the focus of world attention. Continue reading

Theodore Roosevelt On Popular And Scholarly History


By on

0 Comments

theodore roosevelt pugilist and presidentNew York has had several history-minded governors, including Andrew Cuomo, who often cites the Erie Canal and other historical achievements as evidence of our state’s historical greatness and resilience. Levi P. Morton signed the law that created the office of the State Historian. Alfred E. Smith signed the statute that created the network of official local government historians. Franklin D. Roosevelt served for a while as the official historian of the Town of Hyde Park.

But Theodore Roosevelt, governor from 1899 to 1901 and president, 1901-1909, was a notable historian in his own right. He read extensively in history and his home at Sagamore Hill on Long Island reportedly contained about 12,000 books, many of them on history, at the time of his death in 1919.Roosevelt’s own books “The Naval War of 1812” and “The Winning of the West” were best-sellers in their day. His History of New York City is still interesting. Continue reading

Murder In Western Sullivan County (Part II)


By on

0 Comments

TheodoreRooseveltOn a bitter cold Sunday morning in December of 1880, Jacob Gerhardt struck his sister-in-law over the head with a crowbar, crushing her skull and setting the stage for one of the most sensational murder trials in Sullivan County history.

The proceedings, held at a special term of the Sullivan County Oyer and Terminer Court beginning on June 13, 1881, featured District Attorney James I. Curtis and former D.A. John F. Anderson for the prosecution and Monticello law partners Arthur C. Butts and Joseph Merritt and former county judge Timothy Bush for the defense. People came from far and wide to view each day of the trial, and major newspapers from New York City, as well as the local weeklies, reported on the case. Continue reading

Essex County’s William Rush Merriam (Conclusion)


By on

1 Comment

x4A NYHWR MerriamDespite the complexities involved in completing the 1900 census, the only fraud exposed occurred in Maryland, where a male enumerator counted dead people as long as they had expired within the past year. Since other shady circumstances were involved, the man was arrested. Said Census Director William Merriam about the Maryland case: “I have been simply amazed at the irregularities we have discovered. It will be the policy of this office to punish every offender.” And he followed through.

When all the returns were in, statistics provided by Merriam’s team determined the policies and needs that Congress would be addressing. The more data they received, the more impressed they became. From such partisan bodies as the House and Senate, a consensus emerged: Director Merriam had performed brilliantly. Continue reading

The Diaries of Theodore Roosevelt 1877-1886


By on

0 Comments

Theodore Roosevelt DiariesA Most Glorious Ride: The Diaries of Theodore Roosevelt 1877-1886 (SUNY Press, 2015) covers the formative years of TR’s life, and show the transformation of a sickly and solitary Harvard freshman into a confident and increasingly robust young adult. He writes about his grief over the premature death of his father, his courtship and marriage to his first wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, and later the death of Alice and his mother on the same day.

The diaries also chronicle his burgeoning political career in New York City and his election to the New York State Assembly. With his descriptions of balls, dinner parties, and nights at the opera, they offer a glimpse into life among the Gilded Age elite in Boston and New York. Continue reading