Tag Archives: Preservation League of NYS

Old Albany Post Road Named One Of ‘Seven To Save’


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Map of the Old Albany Post Road provided by The Old Road SocietyThe Preservation League of New York State has named a 6-mile section of the Old Albany Post Road in Putnam County to its list of the Empire State’s most threatened historic resources, Seven to Save.

This path between the settlements that would become known as Albany and New York City followed earlier trails established by the Native residents of the region. It provided for movement of troops, supplies and postal mail during the French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars. Connecting homes in a sparsely settled area of Garrison, the Old Albany Post Road still retains landscape features from Colonial times and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Continue reading

Nominations Sought for 2014-15 “Seven to Save” List


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Bent_s_Seven_To_Save-_banner2The Preservation League is seeking nominations from local and regional preservation organizations, advocacy groups, municipalities and others for its 2014-15 list of New York State’s most endangered places, Seven to Save.

Since 1999, the Preservation League has highlighted New York’s most threatened historic sites through its Seven to Save list, which now provides two years of enhanced services from the League to bolster visibility and build support for preservation. Continue reading

Preservation League Seeks Nominations for 2013


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The Preservation League of New York State is seeking nominations for its 2013 Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards, which recognize significant achievements in historic preservation throughout New York State.

The postmark deadline for nominations is February 14, 2013. The awards will be presented during the Preservation League’s Annual Meeting on May 15, 2013 in New York City at the historic New York Yacht Club. Continue reading

Historians Should Promote Preservation


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In recent articles several authors have pointed out the multifaceted world that is New York history. Museums, historical societies, historical agencies on all levels and the local government historians all play a role in our efforts to ensure the continued importance of this state’s history and heritage. Is this the right approach or should there be a more top down method to our madness? Whatever your answer is to that question, the same divergent pattern is found in historic preservation in the Empire State. Continue reading

Enhancing Main St: Making Upper Floors Work Again


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Enhancing Main Street: Making Upper Floors Work Again is a free workshop that will be presented by the Preservation League of New York State on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 from 9:00 am – 3:30 pm at the Saranac Laboratory, 89 Church Street, Saranac Lake, NY.

This program will provide immediately useful information for property owners, developers, and preservation professionals including historic site managers, architects, consultants and accountants dealing with preservation project financing.



This workshop is in very high demand across New York State and this is the only time it is being offered in the North Country in 2011. While the workshop is free, seating is limited, and participants must register by Friday, September 16, 2011 for the 9/20 program.

The workshop’s featured presenters will include:

* Historic Preservation Program Analyst William Krattinger from the NYS Historic Preservation Office, who will discuss the advantages of Historic District designation;

* Joe Fama, architect and Executive Director of the Troy Architectural Program in Troy, who will explain how New York’s building codes and preservation can work together;

* Karl Gustafson of NYS Homes and Community Renewal, who will provide information on the New York State Main Street Program; and

* Gary Beasley, Executive Director of Neighbors of Watertown, who will discuss making the best use of upper floors.

Enhancing Main Street: Making Upper Floors Work Again is presented by the Preservation League of New York State and sponsored by Historic Saranac Lake; Adirondack Architectural Heritage; Empire State Development Corp., NYS Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation; and NYS Homes and Community Renewal.

Excellence in Preservation Awards Announced


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The Preservation League of New York State has selected the interior restoration of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Albany to receive an award for Excellence in Historic Preservation.

The League’s statewide awards program honors notable achievements in retaining, promoting and reusing New York State’s irreplaceable architectural heritage.

“As the lengthy exterior restoration project continues on this Patrick Keely-designed Cathedral, the Awards Jury felt that it was fitting to recognize the completion of the interior restoration effort,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “After a century and a half of continuous use, the ornate interior has been returned to its former glory.”

Contributing to the success of this project were Reverend William H. Pape, Rector, Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception; Elizabeth Simcoe, Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany; Laurence F. Wilson, Lynn Webster, Robert N. Pierpont and Katherine Onufer, Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker Architects; Richard Zandri, Geoff Miles, and Ed Kaczynski, Zandri Construction Corporation, A. Curtis Wilsey, P.E., Quantum Engineering Co. PC; Dennis Fleischer, Ph.D., MuSonics; Naomi Miller, FIESNA, FIALD, LC, Naomi Miller Lighting Design; and Jack C. Healy, P.E., Ryan-Biggs Associates, PC.

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, completed in 1852, is an excellent example of Gothic Revival architecture. The building’s grand interior features a ribbed vaulted ceiling with ornate cast plaster bosses and robust clustered columns creating a series of archways throughout the space. Last painted in 1946, the interior was a monochrome brown. Close inspection revealed that much of the plasterwork was in need of repair, and water-damaged walls, ceilings, and cracked and gouged moldings were visible throughout the structure. The interior restoration is part of a decades-long effort to restore and rejuvenate the Cathedral to ensure that it continues to serve as a landmark of architectural excellence for the city of Albany.

According to William H. Pape, Rector of the Cathedral, “The restoration brings to life many of the architectural details that were hidden by the last painting of the interior more than 60 years ago. The color palette was painstakingly researched, and is based on the completed interior of 1892. The historic terra-cotta colored faux-stone scheme is frequently perceived by visitors as real stone. The base color and hand-applied glazing is warm, welcoming and maintains a sense of awe. “

The award will be presented at the Preservation League’s Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony in New York City at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 12th at the historic New York Yacht Club, 37 West 44th Street.

The complete list of award winners is: The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Interior, Albany County; The Franklin Building, Jefferson County; The Knox Building, the New York Public Library Exterior, and Pierpont Morgan’s 1906 Library Interior, all in New York County; 1844 Nine Mile Creek Aqueduct, Onondaga County; and Montour House, Schuyler County. Uncovering the Underground Railroad, Abolitionism and African American Life in Wayne County, New York: 1820-1880 by Judith Wellman and Marjory Allen Perez will be honored as an outstanding publication. CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity in Syracuse will be honored for organizational excellence. Howard Kirschenbaum will be honored for individual excellence for his contribution to historic preservation in the Adirondack Park.

“In New York State, the preservation and reuse of our historic buildings is fundamental to the economic revitalization of our cities, towns, and villages. The League’s annual Awards program allows us to share preservation success stories that may one day serve as inspiration to others,” said DiLorenzo. “Each year, we are impressed by the number and variety of laudable nominations, and this year was no exception. We are delighted to present this award for the interior restoration of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, and to give the effort the statewide recognition it deserves.”

The Preservation League’s Excellence in Historic Preservation awards program is funded by a generous grant from the Arthur F. and Alice E. Adams Foundation of Miami, Florida.

Photo: Interior of Albany’s Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, courtesy MCWB Architects.

Historic Preservation ‘Code Green’ Workshops


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The Preservation League of New York State and The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) are presenting around the state a series of a two-day CODE GREEN workshop designed for contractors, architects and other building professionals.

The workshops focus on energy conservation issues of interest to those who work in older buildings, but who do not specialize in historic preservation or historic structures.



For example, a contractor hired to insulate a 1920s residence or an architect who wants to understand the application of air sealants for a mixed-use building rehabilitation would come away with information that would help them better serve their clients. Participants will receive technical information on the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State – 2010 and its applications for historic buildings in both classroom and field presentations.

The first workshop will take place Monday, May 16 and Tuesday, May 17, 2011, 8am-4pm each day. Day one will take place at Schenectady County Community College, Stockade Room 101 (78 Washington Avenue, Schenectady); day two includes a field session (1:00 to 4:00 p.m.), at the Schenectady County Historical Society, 32 Washington Avenue.

Registration costs $75 for 2 days, lunch included. Continuing Education credits are available for Architects: 6 LUs/HSW for each full-day of the two-day workshop, totaling 12 LUs/HSW for the two days. AIA members will also receive SD credits.

This is the first of a series of CODE GREEN workshops the League will present across New York State in the summer of 2011. Information on additional workshops is available on the League’s website.

Additioanl workshops will be held in Syracuse (June 16 and 17). Plattsburgh (June 23 and 24), Buffalo (July 14 and 15), Hempstead (August 4 and 5), and Elmira (August 18 and 19).

Applications Available for Preserve New York Grants


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Applications are now available to eligible municipalities and not-for-profit organizations to compete for funds through Preserve New York, a grant program of the Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA).

A total of $90,444 is available for historic structure reports, historic landscape reports and cultural resource surveys. Grants are likely to range between $3,000 and $10,000 each. The application deadline is May 2, 2011.

Examples of eligible projects include: historic structure reports for cultural institutions and public buildings; historic landscape reports for municipal parks; and cultural resource surveys of downtowns and residential neighborhoods.

In 2011, the Preservation League especially encourages projects that advance the preservation of neighborhoods and downtowns that qualify for the NYS Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit; preserve architecture and landscapes of the recent past; and continue the use of historic public buildings.

For Preserve New York Grant Program guidelines, visit the League’s website at www.preservenys.org. Prospective applicants should contact the Preservation League to discuss their projects and to request an application form.

The Preservation League of New York State is a private, not-for-profit organization that works to protect and enhance the Empire State’s historic buildings, landscapes and neighborhoods. The New York State Council on the Arts is the state’s arts funding agency. The Preservation League and NYSCA have collaborated on this grant program annually since 1993.

Organizations and municipalities receiving grant awards in 2010 were: Broome County (2): First Ward Action Council; Town of Vestal; Chemung County: City of Elmira; Cortland County: Cortland Downtown Partnership; Erie County (2): Allentown Association; Nash House Museum; Livingston County: Livingston County Historical Society; Montgomery County: Montgomery County Department of History and Archives; New York County: Two Bridges Neighborhood Council; Niagara County: Oakwood Cemetery Association; Onondaga County: Preservation Association of Central New York; Putnam County: Manitoga; Rensselaer County: Pittstown Historical Society; Schuyler County: Village of Watkins Glen; Ulster County: Jewish Federation of Ulster County; Westchester (2): Friends of Mozartina Musical Arts Conservatory, Inc.; City of Yonkers Department of Planning and Development.

Preservation League, NYSERDA Plan Workshops for 2011


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The Preservation League of New York State recently entered into a partnership with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide workshops throughout New York State that will address code compliance and energy conservation in existing and historic structures.

The League will offer a series of workshops in 2011, held regionally throughout New York State, specifically targeting the merging of historic preservation principles and practice with the requirements of the 2010 NYS Energy Conservation Construction Code.

“The technology for enhancing the energy efficiency of historic buildings is improving all the time,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “The choices property owners make today can extend the useful life of their buildings and pay dividends for owners and residents both now and in the future.”

Additional information and a schedule of workshops will be made available on the League’s website at www.preservenys.org later in 2011.

Nominations Sought for Historic Preservation Awards


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The Preservation League of New York State is seeking nominations for its 2011 Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards, which recognize significant achievements in historic preservation throughout New York State. The postmark deadline for nominations is February 18, 2011. The awards will be presented during the Preservation League’s Annual Meeting on May 12, 2011 in New York City at the historic New York Yacht Club.

“Given the growing concern about the economy and the environment, about jobs and sustainability, historic preservation is more relevant now than ever,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “In New York State, preservation and reuse of our historic buildings is fundamental to the economic revitalization of our cities, towns, and villages. The restoration of our historic neighborhoods, Main Streets, and underutilized buildings creates jobs, provides housing, promotes tourism, stimulates private investment, and conserves energy, resources, and open space. Our annual Awards program allows us to share preservation success stories that may one day serve as inspiration to others.”

To download nomination forms, visit the Preservation League’s website at www.preservenys.org.

The 2010 Excellence Award recipients were: William S. Hackett Middle School, Albany; The Belmont Hotel, Allegany County; Walkway over the Hudson, Poughkeepsie; The Guaranty Building, Buffalo; The American Museum of Natural History, 77th Street Façades, New York; Empire State Building Lobby Restoration, New York; Oswego Public Library, Oswego; West Hall at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Looking for Work: Industrial Archeology in Columbia County, New York by Peter H. Stott (Syracuse University Press, 2007) will be honored as an outstanding publication. Senator David Valesky and Assemblymember Sam Hoyt, Legislative sponsors of the New York State Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program, will be honored for individual excellence.

For additional information please contact the Preservation League at 518-462-5658 x17; or by email at awards@preservenys.org.

Preservation League’s Pillar of New York Award


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The Preservation League of New York State will present its most prestigious commendation, the Pillar of New York Award, to two honorees at the 2010 Pillar of New York Awards gala on November 9 at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City.

Since 1992 the Preservation League has presented its Pillar of New York Award to individuals and organizations whose work in the field of historic preservation makes them role models for others throughout the state and nation.

Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP of New York City will be celebrated for the firm’s role as one of America’s premier authorities on historic preservation, and for their work on some of New York State’s most iconic and best-loved historic buildings and important historic areas, including Grand Central Terminal and the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden.

Matthew Bender IV’s name is virtually synonymous with philanthropy and leadership in historic preservation, particularly in upstate New York, where he has served on the New York State Commission on the Restoration of the Capitol since its creation in 1979, and was a founding member and long-time board member of Historic Albany
Foundation and the Preservation League of New York State.

Each year the League presents The Pillar of New York Award to those who have demonstrated a keen understanding of the value of New York’s historic resources by taking extraordinary actions to protect, preserve, and promote those assets. Tickets for the black tie gala start at $600 for individuals, and tables of 10 are available starting at $10,000. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact the
Preservation League at 518-462-5658 x11.

“Beyer Blinder Belle’s deep understanding of New York’s history as reflected in patterns of settlement and land use has made them a leader in architecture and planning,” said Arete Swartz Warren, Chair of the Preservation League. “Since 1968, the firm’s work has set a high standard around the country and around the world. Beyer Blinder Belle successfully applies classical principles to a new generation of
design and planning, and, as William Shakespeare said, ‘makes us heirs of all eternity.’ For their profound respect of the importance of a community’s social history in architecture and planning, we recognize Beyer Blinder Belle as a Pillar of New York.”

The League will honor Matthew Bender for fostering a family tradition of historic preservation, and as a lifelong leader in the support of preservation and the performing arts. “Of all the ideals and traditions one can pass on to the next generation, a love of history and the arts may be the finest,” said Jay DiLorenzo, president of the Preservation League. “When we value our history, we engender both
appreciation for the past and anticipation for the future. Matthew Bender IV is building a legacy that truly matters, brick by brick and acre by acre. For philanthropic leadership and a peerless reputation as a community leader and executive volunteer, we honor Matthew Bender IV as a Pillar of New York.”

Past honorees of the League’s Pillar of New York Award include the Pell Family for their leadership in the preservation of Fort Ticonderoga and its surroundings; the Pratt Family for the founding and preservation of the Pratt Institute Campus; Tiffany & Co. and The Tiffany & Co Foundation; preservation advocates Connie and David Clapp; Phyllis Lambert, the film Citizen Lambert: Joan of Architecture, and its director, Teri Wehn Damisch; David Beer and Brennan Beer Gorman / Architects and Brennan Beer Gorman Monk / Interiors; Cook + Fox Architects; Southampton Town Councilman Dennis Suskind; Governor George E. Pataki; developer Frank J. Sciame; Ronald Lauder; the Honorable James R. Houghton; Mrs. Vincent Astor; Peggy and
David Rockefeller; architect Hugh Hardy; and Jane Forbes Clark. The League has also previously honored William S. Beinecke, Chairman and Director of the Prospect Hill Foundation; Friends of Hudson; Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries; LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust and the Mertz Gilmore Foundation; Chubb Corporation; Cablevision Systems; and the Hilton Hotel Corporation.

The Preservation League of New York State – New York’s only statewide historic preservation organization – is dedicated to promoting historic preservation as a tool to revitalize our neighborhoods, honor our heritage, and enrich our lives. As the State’s preservation leader, the League seeks to recognize and applaud individuals, organizations and businesses which understand the value of our historic resources and have taken extraordinary actions to protect, preserve and promote those assets.

Preservation League to Present Awards


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On November 9, 2010, the Preservation League will present its most prestigious tribute, the Pillar of New York Award, to two honorees whose commitment to historic preservation is reflected across New York State.

Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP of New York City will be celebrated for the firm’s role as one of America’s premier authorities on historic preservation, and for their work on some of New York State’s most iconic and best-loved historic buildings and important historic areas. Matthew Bender IV’s name is virtually synonymous with philanthropy and leadership in historic preservation, particularly in upstate New York, where has served on the New York State Commission on the Restoration of the Capitol since its creation in 1979.

Each year the League presents The Pillar of New York Award to those who have demonstrated a keen understanding of the value of New York’s historic resources by taking extraordinary actions to protect, preserve, and promote those assets.

The Pillar of New York Gala will be held on November 9, 2010, at 7:00 p.m. at the Hilton and Empire Rooms of the Waldorf=Astoria in New York. Tickets start at $600 for individuals, and tables of 10 are available starting at $10,000.

For more information or to purchase tickets, contact the Preservation League at 518-462-5658 x11.

Preservation League Applauds Private Investment Act


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Upstate revitalization projects may soon be on a faster track, now that banks and insurance companies can more readily utilize New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credits to support commercial redevelopment projects according to the Preservation League of New York State.

The legislation, sponsored by Senator David Valesky (D-Oneida) and Assemblymember Sam Hoyt (D-Buffalo, Grand Island), was seen as a key component in realizing the benefits of New York’s Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits, by bringing new private investment to these efforts. The Governor signed the bill recently, and the new law takes effect immediately.

The League led a coalition of developers, financiers, municipal officials, architects, not-for-profits and other groups to make this change to bring new investments to bear on redevelopment projects in New York State by allowing banks and insurance companies to apply the state Rehabilitation Tax Credits against their New York State franchise tax liabilities.

Banks and insurance companies are among the most active users of the Federal rehabilitation tax credit. Previously, companies based outside of New York State could only apply the credit against their general corporate income tax liability, which reduced the incentive for many companies to invest in rehabilitation projects in the Empire State. These companies may now apply the rehabilitation tax credit program against their state franchise tax liability.

According to Daniel Mackay, the Preservation League’s Director of Public Policy, “This new law will allow a significantly larger pool of experienced and well-capitalized investors into the market for New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credits. This will enable several important projects to move forward, despite the recently-enacted state tax credit deferral program.”

In Part Y of the 2010-2011 Enacted Budget, tax credits for some thirty state business and economic development programs will be deferred to help balance the state spending plan, including incentives for the rehabilitation of commercial properties.

Critics worry that deferring incentives of the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit program will prevent projects from securing financing, as backers will no longer be assured of a timely return on investment. Homeowner rehabilitation projects are capped at $50,000 and are not affected by the deferrals.

“The Senate and Assembly will be returning to Albany in the coming weeks,” said Mackay, “and we will continue our advocacy in hopes of restoring the tax credit program to its intended format so that New York will finally begin to enjoy the long-sought economic and community redevelopment benefits of this program.”

Commentary:Preservation Tax Credits Deferred


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When the New York State Legislature approved the final piece of legislation to close out the State Budget on August 3, they also put the brakes on a number of desperately-needed revitalization projects.

In Part Y of the enacted Budget, tax credits for some thirty state business and economic development programs will be deferred to help balance the state spending plan, including incentives for the rehabilitation of commercial properties.

Specifically, New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credits earned between 2010 and 2012 exceeding $2 million in value will be deferred on the following schedule:

* In 2013, 50% of the balance of credit value over $2 million will be available.
* In 2014, 75% of the remaining balance of credit value will be available.
* In 2015, 100% of the remaining balance of credit value will be available.

Deferring incentives of the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit program will prevent projects from securing financing, as backers will no longer be assured of a timely return on investment, and will be severely limited in the number of projects in which they can invest.

“As the economic recovery continues to make slow progress at the national level, the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program provided a glimmer of hope for our beleaguered upstate cities,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League of New York State. “Now, many of the projects that could transform our struggling downtowns are effectively on hold.”

Homeowner rehabilitation projects are capped at $50,000 and therefore will not be affected.

“Our efforts to protect the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit program in last week’s final budget negotiations fell just short,” said Daniel Mackay, the League’s Director of Public Policy. “The Senate and Assembly will be returning to Albany in the coming weeks, and we will continue our advocacy in hopes of securing full funding for the rehabilitation tax credit at that time.”

According to DiLorenzo, “When the expanded Rehabilitation Tax Credit program was adopted in 2009, a number of modifications were made to reflect New York State’s difficult financial situation. This program has already been adapted to work in a tough fiscal climate. If further changes are imposed upon the program, it will lose all effectiveness as an economic development tool. The tax credits should be allowed to work, unimpeded, in distressed municipalities and neighborhoods across New York State.”

Preservationists Decry Proposed Cuts to Tax Credits


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The Preservation League of New York State joined economic development, smart growth and environmental groups in denouncing the Legislature’s plans on tax law amendments that it says will “undermine years of work to revitalize the upstate economy, protect open space and foster green initiatives.”

The New York State Senate and Assembly are considering tax law amendments that would temporarily defer certain state tax credit incentives for up to six years. Among the targeted credits are the recently expanded (2009) NYS Rehabilitation Tax Credit programs. Just last week, the Senate and Assembly passed legislation designed to bolster these programs by bringing new private investment to redevelopment projects.

“The New York State Legislature is considering tax law changes that will gut this program one week after they passed legislation that allows it to attract significant new national investment to distressed communities throughout New York State,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “Just as redevelopment projects are set to launch in cities throughout the state, this proposed change pulls the rug out from beneath their financing plans.”

According to Robert Simpson, CEO of the CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity in Syracuse, “This rehabilitation tax credit has been anticipated by many as one of New York’s most effective economic development programs, but before we can begin to realize its long-sought economic and community redevelopment benefits, the Legislature is about strip the program of the incentives that make it work.”

Deferring incentives of the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit program are expected to prevent some projects from securing financing, as partners will no longer be assured of a timely return on investment.

“When the expanded Rehabilitation Tax Credit program was adopted in 2009, a number of modifications were made to reflect New York State’s difficult financial situation,” said Daniel Mackay, Director of Public Policy for the Preservation League. “This program has already been adapted to work in a tough fiscal climate. If further changes are imposed upon the program, it will lose all effectiveness as an economic development tool.”

In 2009, the rehabilitation tax credit programs were limited to distressed census tracts in New York State, commercial rehabilitation project credits were capped at a maximum value of $5 million, and the credits were limited to a five-year pilot program, set to sunset in 2014. Despite those limitations, an economic benefits assessment for the program commissioned by the Preservation League showed a $12:1 return on state investment, noting significant job creation and increased local and state tax revenue returns in addition to community redevelopment benefits.

Twenty-eight other business tax credits were also mentioned in legislative discussions, a number of which address environmental clean-ups, promote alternative fuel and energy development, stimulate affordable housing and green building development, and conserve open space.

The tax credits under threat include the Rehabilitation of Commercial (Historic) Properties Credit (expanded in 2009, 2010 enhancement bill is Governor’s program bill, and has passed Senate and Assembly), and the Historic Homeownership Rehabilitation Credit (expanded in 2009, 2010 enhancement bill is Governor’s program bill, and has passed Senate and Assembly).

The proposal under consideration would defer 50% of allowable credits accrued by a project from 2010 – 2013 until 2013 -2016. Rules for allocation in 2013-2016 will be promulgated by the Commissioner of Tax & Finance, so there is not yet any suggestion as to how the credits will be issued in that three year period.

Preserve New York Grants Deadline May 17


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Applications are now available to eligible municipalities and not-for-profit organizations to compete for funds through Preserve New York, a grant program of the Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA).

A total of $109,149 is available for historic structure reports, historic landscape reports and cultural resource surveys. Grants are likely to range between $3,000 and $15,000 each. The application deadline is May 17, 2010.

Examples of eligible projects include: historic structure reports for public buildings or historic sites; historic landscape reports for municipal parks; and cultural resource surveys of downtowns and residential neighborhoods.

In 2010, the Preservation League especially encourages projects that advance the preservation of neighborhoods and downtowns that qualify for the NYS Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit; preserve architecture and landscapes of the recent past; and continue the use of historic public buildings.

For Preserve New York Grant Program guidelines, visit the League’s website at www.preservenys.org. Prospective applicants should contact the Preservation League to discuss their projects and to request an application form.

The Preservation League of New York State is a private, not-for-profit organization that works to protect and enhance the Empire State’s historic buildings, landscapes and neighborhoods. The New York State Council on the Arts is the state’s arts funding agency. The Preservation League and NYSCA have collaborated on this grant program annually since 1993.

2010 Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards


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The Preservation League of New York State is seeking nominations for its 2010 Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards, which recognize significant achievements in historic preservation throughout New York State. The postmark deadline for nominations is February 11, 2010. The awards will be presented during the Preservation League’s Annual Meeting on May 12, 2010 in New York City at the historic New York Yacht Club.

“Too many historic buildings throughout New York State are currently vacant, underutilized, and deteriorating,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “Our annual Awards program allows us to share preservation success stories that may one day serve as inspiration to others. By highlighting meaningful contributions in the field of historic preservation, we encourage high standards for other projects, foster revitalization of our historic neighborhoods and downtowns, and celebrate New York’s incomparable architectural legacy.”

Nomination forms will be mailed by January 1, and are available for download as a PDF. For additional information on the awards please contact the Preservation League office at 518-462-5658 x17; or by email at awards@preservenys.org.

Workshops And Webinars On NYS Preservation Tax Credit


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The Preservation League of New York State is sponsoring or participating in a series of workshops and webinars this fall to help New Yorkers take advantage of New York’s expanded preservation tax credit which begins in 2010. The tax benefit provides incentives for developers and municipalities seeking to rehabilitate historic buildings, and is hoped to advance redevelopment and economic stimulus goals throughout New York State by spurring over $500 million dollars of economic activity and creating some 2,000 jobs over its initial five-year lifespan.

The act will take effect on January 1, 2010. For more information on New York’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit Programs, call the New York State Historic Preservation Office at (518) 237-8643 or visit http://nysparks.state.ny.us/shpo/investment/index.htm .

Workshops and webinars:

Albany Tax Credit Workshop
Thursday, September 17, 2009
Time: 8:30 to 12:00 noon
Place: 11 North Pearl Street
$5 for Historic Albany Foundation members, $10 for the general public. Email Cara Macri at cmacri@historic-albany.org or call 518-465-0876 x12

Rochester Tax Credit Workshop
Tuesday, September 22, 2009
Time: 8:00 to 11:00 a.m.
Place: Nixon Peabody LLP, 1100 Clinton Square
Register online, or for more information, email Dan Kolodner at dkolodner@nixonpeabody.com.

Statewide Tax Credit Webinar
Tuesday, September 22, 2009
Time: 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
The law firm of Cannon Heyman & Weiss will host a webinar on the recently expanded NYS Historic Preservaion Tax Credit. For further details and registration information, visit www.chwattys.com or call 518-465-1500 (Albany) or 716-856-1700 (Buffalo).

Syracuse Tax Credit Workshop
Thursday, September 24, 2009
Time: 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Place: Hotel Syracuse, 500 South Warren Street, Persian Terrace
Sponsored by the Metropolitan Development Association of Syracuse and Central New York. For more information, contact Ben Walsh at brwalsh@mda-cny.com.

Buffalo Tax Credit Workshop
Wednesday, September 30, 2009
Times: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. (Commercial) 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. (Residential)
Place: Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, 25 Nottingham Terrace
Hosted by Assemblymember Sam Hoyt, the workshops will offer guidance for people and businesses interested in using the Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits authored by the Assemblyman. To RSVP, call Preservation Buffalo Niagara at 716-852-3300.

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Governor Signs Rehabilitation Tax Credit Enhancements


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Joined by state, municipal and local advocates for community revitalization and historic preservation, Governor David Paterson signed legislation that greatly improves the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit program. The measure (A.9023-Hoyt/S.6056-Valesky) provides incentives and program features for developers and municipalities seeking to rehabilitate historic buildings, and is hoped to advance redevelopment and economic stimulus goals throughout New York State.

“We have every reason to believe that the New York State Rehabilitation Tax Credit will prove one of the most effective economic and community development programs in the state,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League of New York State, the not-for-profit organization that led the charge for enhanced tax credits.

Commissioner Deborah VanAmerongen of the State Division of Housing and Community Renewal said, “The Rehabilitation Tax Credits will foster new private and federal investment where it is most needed: our economically distressed downtowns and commercial districts, main streets, and older residential neighborhoods. Further, these incentives will encourage the use or reuse of existing affordable housing resources. I’m delighted that we now have a more powerful tool for revitalizing communities across New York State. “

New York’s first-ever rehabilitation tax credit was adopted as Chapter 547 of the Laws of 2006, but limitations of both the commercial and residential programs failed to provide sufficient incentives to deliver economic and community revitalization to municipalities in need. An economic impact study recently conducted by HR&A Advisors of New York, an industry leader in economic development, real estate and public policy consulting, predicts that the enhanced rehabilitation tax credit will spur over $500 million dollars of economic activity in New York State and create some 2,000 jobs over its initial five-year lifespan.

The act will take effect on January 1, 2010. For more information on New York’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit Programs, call the New York State Historic Preservation Office at (518) 237-8643 or visit http://nysparks.state.ny.us/shpo/investment/index.htm .

Preservation League to Honor 2009 Award Recipients


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The Preservation League of New York State will honor and celebrate the recipients of its Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards at the The New York Yacht Club, 37 West 44th Street – New York City on Wednesday evening, May 13, 2009 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The suggested donation is $60 per ticket. For more information contact Shelley LaClair at 518-462-5658 x13 or download the invitation and RSVP card from the League’s website at www.preservenys.org.