Tag Archives: Podcasts

New England Bound: Slavery in Early New England


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ben_franklins_worldNew England was a place with no cash crops. It was a place where many of its earliest settlers came to live just so they could worship their Puritan faith freely. New England was also a place that became known for its strong anti-slavery sentiment during the 19th century. So how did New England also become a place that practiced slavery?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Wendy Warren, an Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-finalist book New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America (Liveright, 2016)joins us to explore why New Englanders practiced slavery and just how far back the region’s slave past goes. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/170

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Religious Life of Benjamin Franklin Podcast


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ben_franklins_worldWe remember Benjamin Franklin as an accomplished printer, scientist, and statesman. Someone who came from humble beginnings and made his own way in the world. Rarely do we remember Franklin as a man of faith.

Benjamin Franklin spent more time grappling with questions of religion, faith, virtue, and morality in his writing than about any other topic.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Thomas S. Kidd, a Professor of History at Baylor University and author of Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2017), leads us on a detailed exploration of the religious life of Benjamin Franklin. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/169

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Camp Upton Featured On Long Island History Project


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long island history project logoThe latest episode of The Long Island History Project heads to Camp Upton. Suzanne Johnson and David Clemens discuss the history of this vast military training camp in Brookhaven that served the US Army in World War I and II.

We focus on their new book on the camp from Arcadia Press that features images from 1917-18 and beyond. Many of the images are drawn from the Longwood Public Library where both Suzanne and David were directors.

You’ll hear about the 77th Division, the Harlem Hellfighters, Irving Berlin, and the amazing feat of raising an army to fight The War to End All Wars. Continue reading

Colonists and Animals in North America


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we study the history of colonial North America, we tend to focus on European colonists and their rivalries with each other and with Native Americans. But humans weren’t the only living beings occupying North America during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

Rivalries existed between humans and animals too. And these human-animal rivalries impacted and shaped how European colonists used and settled North American lands.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Andrea Smalley, an associate professor of history at Northern Illinois University and author of Wild By Nature: North American Animals Confront Colonization (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017), joins us to explore the many ways wild animals shaped colonists’ ideas and behavior as they settled and interacted with North American lands. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/168

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Artist Paul Peabody On Rockland History Podcast


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crossroads of rockland historyThis month on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan featured the 42nd Annual Holiday Exhibition at the Historical Society of Rockland County, entitled “Peace & Joy.”

In addition to miniatures and dollhouses, the exhibition features the art, miniatures and marionettes made by hand by Paul Peabody.

Clare Sheridan’s guest was Jeanne Peabody Walsh, Paul Peabody’s daughter, who spoke about her father’s life, work and art. Continue reading

The Early History of New Orleans


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ben_franklins_worldThe French established New Orleans and the greater colony of Louisiana in 1717. By 1840, New Orleans had become the 3rd largest city in the United States. How did that happen?

How did New Orleans transform from a sleepy, minor French outpost into a large and important early American city with a thriving, bustling port?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’ World podcast, Eberhard “Lo” Faber, an assistant professor of history at Loyola University, New Orleans and the author of Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America (Princeton University Press, 2015), leads us on an exploration of the early history of New Orleans. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/167

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Long Island: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Time On The North Shore


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long island history project logoThe Great Gatsby left its mark on both Long Island and literature. But while F. Scott Fitzgerald spent two riotous years living in Great Neck, it took a move to France to turn those experiences into a masterpiece.

On the latest episode of The Long Island History Project, Charles Riley explains the history of the North Shore of Long Island in the 1920s and why Fitzgerald had to leave to get Gatsby written. Riley, author of Free as Gods: How the Jazz Age Reinvented Modernism, is also the director of the Nassau County Museum of Art.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading