Tag Archives: Podcasts

Rockland Co History Podcast: Mary Cardenas


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crossroads of rockland historyThis month on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan interviewed Mary Cardenas, director of the Orangetown Historical Museum and Archives, who spoke about their new exhibition “Loyal to the Crown,” which opened there on Saturday, October 14. Cardenas discussed what it was like for Loyalists during the Revolution. We also welcomed special guest George Way, whose collection of fine English antiques will be on view throughout the exhibition to help tell the story of the eighteenth-century Loyalist in colonial America.

Mr. Way’s collection is a magnificent group of original art, objects and artifacts from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including an important portrait of Henrietta Maria, wife of Charles I, attributed to Sir Anthony van Dyck. The exhibition will allow visitors to experience the culture and contrast that brought many to proclaim “God Save the King.” Continue reading

Pauline Maier’s American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow much can the work of one historian impact how we view and study the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we investigate the answer to this question by exploring the life and work of Pauline Maier, a historian who spent her life researching and investigating the American Revolution. Over the course of her lifetime, Maier wrote four important books about the American Revolution: From Resistance to Revolution (Knopf, 1973), The Old Revolutionaries (Knopf, 1980), American Scripture (Knopf, 1997), and Ratification (Simon & Schuster, 2010).

Mary Beth Norton, Joanne Freeman, Todd Estes, and Lindsay Chervinsky join us as we journey through Maier’s body of work to better understand the American Revolution and how one historian can impact how we view and study history. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/155

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Freedoms We Lost in the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldDeclaring independence from Great Britain required the formation of new governments.

But why did Americans want and need new governments? And how did their interactions and experiences with their old, colonial governments inform their decisions to create new governments?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Barbara Clark Smith, a curator in the division of political history at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the author of The Freedoms We Lost: Consent and Resistance in Revolutionary America (The New Press, 2010), leads us on an exploration of how Americans interacted with their government before the American Revolution and how the Revolution changed their interaction and ideas about government. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/154

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Committees and Congresses: Governments of the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow did the American revolutionaries organize and coordinate local, provincial, and intercolonial action?

How did the revolutionaries form governments?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World Doing History: To the Revolution podcast series we explore governance and governments of the American Revolution with three scholars: Mark Boonshoft, Benjamin Irvin, and Jane Calvert. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/153

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Origins of the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhat caused the American Revolution?

Was it the issue of ‘No Taxation without Representation?’ Was it conflict and change in the social order of colonial and British society? Or, was the Revolution about differences in ideas about governance and the roles government should play in society?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore one set of ideas about the origins of the American Revolution with Bernard Bailyn, a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/152

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Rockland Co History Podcast: Carson McCullers


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crossroads of rockland historyThis month on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan interviewed Dr. Nick Norwood, director of the Carson McCullers Center at Columbus State University in Columbus GA about the life and work of Carson McCullers. Carson McCullers moved to Nyack, NY with her mother and sister in 1944 and lived there until her death in 1967. In the Nyack house she completed The Member of the Wedding (1946), The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951), Clock without Hands (1961), and other plays, short stories, poetry, and autobiographical works. 2017 marks 100 years since McCullers’ birth and 50 years since her death.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading