Tag Archives: Podcasts

The Road to Concord, 1775


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldHow did the colonists of Massachusetts go from public protests meant to shame government officials and destroy offending property, to armed conflict with British Regulars in Lexington and Concord?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, John Bell, the prolific blogger behind Boston1775.net and the author of The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War, (Westholme Publishing, 2016), leads us on an investigation of what brought colonists and redcoats to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/129

Continue reading

American Revolutions: A Continental History


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldHistorians often portray the American Revolution as an orderly, if violent, event that moved from British colonists’ high-minded ideas about freedom  to American independence from Great Britain and the ratification of the Constitution of 1787.

But was the American Revolution an orderly event that took place only between Great Britain and her North American colonists? Was it really about high-minded ideas?

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Alan Taylor joins us on Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History to explore the American Revolution as a Continental event with details from his book, American Revolutions: A Continental History. 1750-1804 (W.W. Norton & Company, 2016). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/128

Continue reading

Historians Podcast: History’s Wonder Women


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week on “The Historians” podcast, Sam Maggs discusses her book on women who
made often unheralded contributions to history, Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History.  On part two of the podcast Bob Cudmore and Dave Greene discuss the story of a debutante spy for America during World War II, Gertrude Sanford Legendre.

Listen to the podcast here.    Continue reading

American Enlightenments


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldIn many ways, the Enlightenment gave birth to the United States. Enlightened ideas informed protests over imperial governance and taxation and over whether there should be an American bishop.

If we want to understand early America, we need to understand the Enlightenment.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Caroline Winterer, a Professor of History at Stanford University and author of American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale University Press, 2016), takes us through her ideas about the Enlightenment and how it influenced early America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/127

Continue reading

Inspiration for Historic Painting ‘Christina’s World’


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, Christina Baker Kline discusses her historical novel A Piece of the World.  The book deals with artist Andrew Wyeth and Christina Olson, a disabled woman from Maine pictured
in Wyeth’s provocative 1948 painting, “Christina’s World.”  Kline was author of the best-selling historical novel, Orphan Train. Also on this episode, Bob Cudmore and Dave Greene tell the life story of Amsterdam, NY artist Mary Van Der Veer.

Listen to the podcast here.    Continue reading

The Reintegration of American Loyalists


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldWhat happened to the loyalists who stayed in the United States after the War for Independence?

After the war, 60,000 loyalists and 15,000 slaves evacuated the United States. But thousands more opted to remain in the new nation.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Rebecca Brannon, an Associate Professor of History at James Madison University and author of From Revolution to Reunion: The Reintegration of  South Carolina Loyalists (University of South Carolina Press, 2016), joins us to explore what happened to the loyalists who stayed. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/126

Continue reading

Death, Suicide, & Slavery in British North America


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldEarly America was a diverse place. It contained many different people who had many different traditions that informed how they lived…and died.

How did early Americans understand death? What did they think about suicide?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Terri Snyder, a Professor of American Studies at California State University, Fullerton and author of The Power to Die: Slavery and Suicide in British North America (University of Chicago Press, 2015), helps us answer these questions and more as she takes us on an exploration of slavery and suicide in British North America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/125

Continue reading