Tag Archives: Podcasts

Death, Suicide, & Slavery in British North America


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldEarly America was a diverse place. It contained many different people who had many different traditions that informed how they lived…and died.

How did early Americans understand death? What did they think about suicide?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Terri Snyder, a Professor of American Studies at California State University, Fullerton and author of The Power to Die: Slavery and Suicide in British North America (University of Chicago Press, 2015), helps us answer these questions and more as she takes us on an exploration of slavery and suicide in British North America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/125

Continue reading

Walter Smith’s Lifelong Fascination with Railroads


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week on “The Historians” podcast, Reverend Walter Smith of Lisbon in northern New York discusses his lifelong fascination with railroads. Reverend Smith writes the “Reminiscing” column in the Bulletin of the Bridge Line Historical Society, a railroad enthusiast publication that emphasizes the history of the Delaware and Hudson Railroad.
Listen to the podcast here.    Continue reading

Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldWhat did the American Revolution mean and achieve? What sort of liberty and freedom did independence grant Americans and which Americans should receive them?

Americans grappled with these questions soon after the American Revolution. They debated these issues during the Constitutional Convention of 1787, in the first congresses, and as they followed events in revolutionary France and Haiti during the 1790s and early 1800s.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, James Alexander Dun, an Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University and author of Dangerous Neighbors: Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), joins us to explore the ways the Haitian Revolution shaped how Americans viewed their own revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/124

Continue reading

Political Allegiance in the American Revolution


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldIn December 1773, the Cape Cod Tea Crisis revealed that the people of “radical” Massachusetts were far from united in their support for the American Revolution. An observation that leads us to wonder: How many Americans supported the Patriot cause?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we speak with four scholars to explore the complexities of political allegiance during the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/123

Continue reading

Interview: German Churches in Metropolitan New York


By on

0 Comments

Dr. Richard Haberstroh, author of German Churches in Metropolitan New York: A Research Guide, joined host Jane E. Wilcox on the Forget-Me-Not Hour podcast this week. Richard talked about Germans in the New York City metro area – their political and religious history in Germany, why they came to New York, where they settled, and what churches they organized here. Richard also discussed his book (published by the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society) and gave some tips on researching German ancestors in the New York City area.

Listen on-demand here. Continue reading

History Columnist Dan Weaver on ‘The Historians’ Podcast


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, Amsterdam (NY) Recorder history columnist Dan Weaver describes actress: Debbie Reynolds’s connection to Amsterdam. Weaver also talks about the Cabbage Patch doll and Coleco and the story of Derby, the blind proprietor of a newsstand in the Amsterdam post office. Weaver owns The Book Hound bookstore in Amsterdam.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Revolution: The Men Who Lost America


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldDid the Americans win the War for Independence? Or did the British simply lose the war?

The history of the American War for Independence is complicated. And history books tell many different versions of the event, which is why we need an expert to guide us through the intricacies of whether we should look at the war as an American victory, a British defeat, or in some other light.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Andrew O’Shaughnessy, author of The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (Yale University Press, 2013) joins us to explore British viewpoints of the American War for Independence. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/122

Continue reading