Tag Archives: Photography

“Wild Jess” Elliott: Setting the Record Straight


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camp elliottJessie Elliott was a unique figure in the history of the Beaver River country in the west central Adirondacks. Visitors to the tiny settlement of Beaver River are still told she went to prison for her role in the bootlegging that was rampant in the lumberjack days of the early 1920s. She is listed among the “lawless ladies” in Niki Kourofsky’s recent book, Adirondack Outlaws. Pat Thompson’s memoir about life in Beaver River claims Jessie rode her steed through the settlement with her long hair flowing and a pistol in a holster on her belt. More fantastic stories about Jessie can be found in Bill Donnelly’s Short History of Beaver River where she is described, among other things, as a good-looking Calamity Jane, a bootlegger, and a prostitute. The truth underlying the legends reveals a much more complex and interesting wilderness woman. Continue reading

New Stoddard Photography Book Features Lake George


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water and light book coverThe Chapman Historical Museum in Glens Falls has just published Water & Light: S.R. Stoddard’s Lake George, a new work on the photography of Seneca Ray Stoddard.

The 160-page book features 150 of Stoddard’s photos, as well as some samples of his painting, sketches and cartography.

As a 19th century American photographer, S. R. Stoddard is often ranked with William Henry Jackson and Carlton Watkins, and the quality of his photographic compositions is compared with many of the Hudson River School painters. It is estimated Stoddard took some ten thousand images in the Adirondack Mountains alone. Continue reading

Erie Canalway Photo Contest Winners Announced


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Twelve images that capture the beauty and character of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor have been selected as winners of the 12th Annual Erie Canalway Photo Contest.

Winning images will be featured in the 2018 Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Calendar, which will be available for free in December.

Judges selected twelve winners from nearly 300 entries. First, second and third place photographs were chosen in each of four contest categories: Classic Canal, Along the Trail, On the Water, and Canal Communities. In addition, twelve photographs received an honorable mention. Continue reading

Eldridge Street Synagogue Restoration in Photographs


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museum at eldridge streetThe Museum at Eldridge Street will open a new exhibition, “Rediscovery, Restoration & Renewal: The Eldridge Street Synagogue in Photographs,” on Thursday, September 14 from 6 to 8 pm with an opening reception.

Ten years ago, the restoration of the Eldridge Street Synagogue was completed. After a 20-year, $20 million effort, the building was brought back from the verge of collapse to stand once again as glorious as it had been when it opened in 1887.   Continue reading

William Henry Jackson’s Early Adirondack Color Postcards


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1902 Jackson ADK carryOne of the greatest landscape photographers during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century was William Henry Jackson (April 4, 1843 – June 30, 1942). A native son of the Adirondacks Jackson was born in Keeseville, New York to George Jackson and Harriet Allen. Harriet was a talented water-colorist and William inherited her artistic flair. His first job as an artist in 1858 was a re-toucher for a photography studio in Troy New York.

In 1866 after serving in the Civil War, Jackson boarded a Union Pacific train to the end of the line in Omaha, Nebraska. There he entered the photography business. The Union Pacific gave him a commission in 1869 to document the scenery along their routes for promotional purposes. It was this work that was discovered by Ferdinand Hayden who invited Jackson on the 1870 U.S. government survey (predecessor of the U.S. Geologic Survey) of the Yellowstone River and Rocky Mountains. He was also on the 1871 Hayden Geologic Survey which led to the creation of Yellowstone as America’s first National Park. It was Jackson’s images that played an important role in convincing Congress to establish the Park in 1872. Continue reading

Photography’s History and Future Conference Planned


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A three-day conference, “PhotoHistory/PhotoFuture,” will explore the scholarship, practice, profession, preservation, and access to photography’s – including motion pictures’ – history, present day expression, and projected opportunities and challenges. The conference takes place April 20 to 22, 2018 in Rochester.

PhotoHistory/PhotoFuture is sponsored and organized by RIT Press, the scholarly book publishing enterprise at Rochester Institute of Technology. The call for scholarly papers to be presented at the conference invites proposals on the widest and deepest range of topics on photography’s history and future from an equally broad range of scholars, professionals, and practitioners. Continue reading

The Borscht Belt: Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland


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the-borscht-belt-bookThe Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland (Cornell University Press, 2016) by Marisa Schenfeld, which features essays by Stefan Kanfer and Jenna Weissman Joselit, presents Scheinfeld’s photographs of abandoned sites where resorts, hotels, and bungalow colonies once boomed in the Catskill Mountain region of upstate New York. Today the Borscht Belt is recalled through the nostalgic lens of summer swims, Saturday night dances, and comedy performances. But its current state, like that of many other formerly glorious regions, is nothing like its earlier status. Forgotten about and exhausted, much of its structural environment has been left to decay.  Continue reading

George Eastman Museum Collections Now Available Online


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our visit to u.s. niagara fallsThe George Eastman Museum has launched a new platform that allows public online access to more than 250,000 objects from its collections.

Objects from the museum’s photography, technology, and George Eastman Legacy collections are now searchable, and more objects from the museum’s  holdings are being added on an ongoing basis. Objects from the moving image collection are expected to become accessible in the coming months. Continue reading