Tag Archives: OPRHP

Carol Ash Elected to Palisades Park Conservancy Board


By on

0 Comments

Carol_Ash_2013_0Former Palisades Interstate Park Commission Executive Director and New York State Parks Commissioner Carol Ash has been elected to serve a three-year term on the Palisades Parks Conservancy Board of Directors.

During her career in the fields of natural and cultural resources preservation, Carol Ash has served as the first director of the Office of Environmental Policy and Management for the Port Authority of NY and NJ, the NYC Regional Director of the NYS DEC, the PIPC Executive Director, and the NY State Parks Commissioner. Continue reading

20 Nominations Made for NYS, National Registers


By on

1 Comment

New York State ParksThe New York State Board for Historic Preservation has recommended the addition of 20 properties, resources, and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

“Survival of these noteworthy places is crucial in preserving the great diversity of New York’s communities,” said Rose Harvey, Commissioner of the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. “Placing these landmarks on the State and National Registers of Historic Places will offer well-deserved recognition along with tools to help them last into the future.” Continue reading

Busing New York:
Field Trips and Local Paths Through History


By on

6 Comments

field-trip_students_busOn May 30, 2013, I wrote about a high school teacher who took a class to Greece and wondered how that teacher would go about creating a visit to New York State. He used a travel agent because multiple paths through Greek history exist and he could pick the one he wanted. One might think that something similar could be done in New York but consider the following examples.

The Historical Society of Rockland County has numerous bus trips throughout the year. They sell out and are well received. They also are mainly in Rockland County which the Society, of course knows well. After that post about Greece, I received a private email which I am authorized to share. The Society would like to expand its bus programs beyond the county but encountered problems. Continue reading

17 Nominations for State, National Registers


By on

1 Comment

New York State ParksAt the end of June, the New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 17 properties, resources and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits. Continue reading

Saratoga, Capital Region Sites Hosting Geocache Challenge


By on

0 Comments

New York State ParksThe Saratoga/Capital District Region of New York State Parks is hosting 50 all new geocaches in 16 state parks and historic sites, and will hold a drawing for prizes for those participants who successfully complete the geocache challenge by finding any 35 of the 50 geocaches.

The geocache challenge will begin Memorial Day Weekend and extend through Veteran’s Day, November 11th.  The goal of the extended event is to bring people out to experience state parks and historic sites and to introduce patrons to the family-oriented sport of geocaching. Continue reading

Volunteer Now For “I Love My Park Day” on May 4th


By on

0 Comments

ILoveMyPark_HPSlideVolunteers can now sign up for the second annual “I Love My Park Day” on May 4th – a statewide effort to help clean up and beautify New York’s state parks and historical sites. At last year’s event, thousands of New Yorkers pitched in to paint, plant, clean, build, and make repairs across the state.

This year’s volunteer effort is especially important as many of our parks are still recovering from damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. New York’s parks are one of our state’s most treasured assets, and this event helps ensure that New Yorkers and visitors to our state can continue to enjoy and appreciate New York’s natural beauty. To find an event near you and sign up, click here.

27 NYS Nominations Made for Registers of Historic Places


By on

5 Comments

New York State ParksThe New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 27 properties, resources and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including a Livingston County church where the American Red Cross got its start and a Rockland County complex that was central to the nation’s textile industry.

“The multi-faceted story of New York can be traced in its many distinctive buildings and unique landmarks,” said Rose Harvey, Commissioner of the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. “It is an honor to help preserve these unique landmarks by listing them on the State and National Registers of Historic Places.” Continue reading

Four Freedoms Park, NY State’s Newest, Opens


By on

0 Comments

The newest New York state park, located on Roosevelt Island in the East River New York City, has opened. Four Freedoms Park, which is New York’s 214th state park, is tribute to the life and work of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a former governor of New York State who as President led our nation out of the Great Depression and guided America during World War II. The Park opened to the public on October 24.

The four-acre park is the last design of the iconic American architect Louis I. Kahn – the only design by Kahn in New York City. The park features a granite plaza at the southern tip of Roosevelt Island, tree-lined paths and a bronze bust of Roosevelt by acclaimed portrait sculptor Jo Davidson.

The name of the park refers to a speech delivered by President Roosevelt on January 6, 1941, in which he described his vision for a world founded on four essential human freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.
 
The Park has been decades in the making. Governor Nelson Rockefeller and Mayor Lindsay announced the project in 1973, appointing Kahn as its architect; Kahn died unexpectedly shortly after completing the Park’s plans and the City of New York’s financial troubles dampened momentum for the project. More than 30 years later, former Ambassador to the United Nations William vanden Heuvel and the Four Freedoms Park Conservancy spearheaded a philanthropic effort to revive the park, enabling construction to begin in 2010.

The Park will offer a free interactive digital educational resource that visitors will be able to access on any mobile device. It will provide a multi-media narrative critical to understanding President Roosevelt’s significance, and was designed with the encouragement of the National Endowment for the Humanities with the help of historians and FDR scholars. For more information visit: http://www.fdrfourfreedomspark.org/

With the addition of Four Freedoms, the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation operates 179 state parks and 35 historic sites. Four Freedoms will be the first new State Park in New York City since East River State Park opened in Brooklyn in 2007 and the first new State Park in the state since the Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park opened outside of Poughkeepsie in 2009. Park maintenance, programming and security will be provided cooperatively by State Parks, Four Freedoms Park Conservancy, and the Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation.

Staatsburgh Historic Site Renovations Underway


By on

0 Comments

Thanks in part to New York State’s recent $134 million investment in New York Works Projects aimed at putting New Yorkers back to work and restoring and repairing state parks and historic sites, the east portico and estate wall of Staatsburgh State Historic Site, in Staatsburgh, DUtchess County, will soon receive a much-needed restoration of its grand estate wall and historic entrance portico.

The projects are expected to take a year to complete. New York Works is designed to reinvent state economic development with innovative new strategy that will put New Yorkers back to work rebuilding the state’s infrastructure. The Task Force will help create tens of thousands of jobs by coordinating comprehensive capital plans, overseeing investment in infrastructure projects, and accelerating hundreds of critical projects across the state.

During the estate wall and east portico projects, house tours will continue to be offered, the site’s museum shop and exhibit gallery will remain accessible. House tours are given Thursday through Sunday, between 11am and 5pm (last tour starts at 4pm) through October, and during special holiday hours in November and December. Additionally the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has created a “virtual tour” video that will enable all visitors to see highlights of the mansion’s interior while hearing about the architecture of the house and the people who lived and worked at the mansion in its heyday (1895-1920).

Formerly the country estate of Ogden Mills and Ruth Livingston Mills, the opulent Beaux Arts mansion was expanded and decorated to its present size of 79 rooms in 1895 by renowned architect Stanford White, of the well-known architectural firm, McKim, Mead & White. Part of White’s renovation included the building of a grand, two-storey portico entrance, which dominates the view of the house as one approaches from the road, and clearly communicates the wealth and importance of its occupants. After more than a century of continual use, this part of the house is in need of structural and aesthetic rehabilitation. Also included in the NY Works Project plans for Staatsburgh are repair of the estate wall and the mansion’s roof.

To visit Staatsburgh State Historic Site, please call 845-889-8851 or visit their website. House tours are available Thursday through Sunday, from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm in season (April through October) with additional special hours in the holiday season and winter months.

Staatsburgh State Historic Site is located on Old Post Road in Staatsburg, off Route 9 between Rhinebeck and Hyde Park. The historic site is one of six historic sites and 15 state parks administered by New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation – Taconic Region.

Lecture: The Excavations of Fort Orange


By on

0 Comments

Dr. Paul Huey, now retired as archeologist for the New York State Historic Sites system (Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation) who will present a talk on the history of Fort Orange and the excavation in 1970 and 1971 of archeological remains of the fort ahead of the construction of Interstate 787, an event which inspired a revival of interest in the history of Albany in the Dutch period.

Fort Orange was a trading center built by the Dutch West India Company in 1624. The fort was located outside of Beverwijck (present-day Albany), to the south and near the river bank. In 1647, Petrus Stuyvesant, representing the West India Company as director of New Netherland, began to allow private traders to build houses inside the fort. Other traders built houses close to and outside the fort, which Stuyvesant considered to be illegal.

Consequently, Stuyvesant established the settlement of Beverwijck as a town at what he considered a satisfactory distance away from the fort. The fort and all of New Netherland were taken by the English in 1664 during peacetime. The fort was retaken briefly by the Dutch who then returned it to the English, and it was finally abandoned in 1676 by the English. The English then built a new fort on the State Street hill in Albany.

The event is hosted by The Friends of the New York State Library and will take place on September 26 2012 from 12:15pm – 1:15pm at the 7th floor Librarians Room, at the New York State Library, Madison Avenue, Albany, NY. To register for the program, go to: http://www.forms2.nysed.gov/nysl/trngreg.cfm

Illustration: Location of Fort Orange on today’s Albany’s riverfront from Len Tantillo’s Visions of New York State. Digital copy courtesy The People of Colonial Albany Project.

2012 Hudson River Valley Ramble Events Set


By on

0 Comments

The 2012 Hudson River Valley Ramble will be held on the weekends of September 8-9, 15-16, 22-23, and 29-30, 2012, with more than 165 events from the Capital District to New York City.

The Ramble aims to bring people outside to enjoy our distinct cultural heritage and the natural resources of the Hudson River Valley. It also serves as an economic boost for the regional economy. Nearly 150 environmental, land conservancy, trail and historic preservation organizations, New York State historic sites and parks, as well as the National Park Service participate by offering events, and many are free of charge and family friendly.

Guided hikes, cycling and kayaking tours, historic site walks, festivals and river explorations are examples of some of the types of events that will be available for every ability level. With all that the Ramble has to offer, you’ll have no problem finding a Ramble adventure near you. 
For a complete listing of events, visit www.hudsonrivervalleyramble.com. Copies of the program guide can be found in the August issue of Chronogram magazine or at various tourist destinations throughout the Hudson Valley. They may also be downloaded directly from the web site.

The Hudson River Valley Ramble is presented by the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area and Hudson River Valley Greenway, in partnership with the NYS DEC Hudson River Estuary Program, NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, the NYS Office of Tourism, the National Park Service, and nearly 150 organizations hosting Ramble events throughout the Hudson River Valley.

New York Heritage Weekend, May 19 and 20th


By on

0 Comments

Organizations throughout the state will celebrate New York history during this year’s New York Heritage Weekend on May 19th & 20th. Now in its 3rd year, the weekend will offer special programs, discounted or free admission to sites and events that celebrate national, state or local heritage.

Guided hikes, local history festivals, historic garden events, open historic houses, and events that explore all kinds of New York culture and history are on tap. Last year Heritage Weekend hosted 166 Heritage Weekend events with 143 federal, state, and private organizations. For a full searchable listing of events, and maps see www.heritageweekend.org .

Not only does this Heritage Weekend celebrate New York’s rich history, but it also boosts local economies. According to recent studies, tourism generates 81 billion dollars and sustains over 670,000 jobs in New York. According to a recent study recent commissioned by the U.S. Cultural & Heritage Tourism Marketing Council and the U.S. Department of Commerce, 78% of US domestic travelers participate in cultural or heritage activities.

“Heritage Weekend opens the door to so many of New York’s great historic and cultural treasures,” said Beth Sciumeca, Executive Director of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor. “Once that door is open, people will find that there is a lifetime of places to experience throughout the state.”

New York Heritage Weekend 2012 is funded in part by The Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area and Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor and sponsored by I Love NY, National Park Service, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and participating event partners.

Cultural Landscape Workshop Set for Lorenzo SHS


By on

1 Comment

Lorenzo State Historic Site, in Cazenovia, Madison County, NY, will host a one-day workshop for preservation planners, cultural resource managers and stewards of historic properties.

The day’s agenda will include defining the types and characteristics of cultural landscapes; documenting historic and current conditions including preparation of period and contemporary plans; developing treatment plans within an historic preservation context; examples of cultural landscape reports and their various components; interpreting the cultural landscape; what resources to consult and what steps to take in establishing a cultural landscape preservation program; and touring the historic landscape at Lorenzo.

Presenting cultural landscape experts:

John Auwaerter, Co-director of the Center for Cultural Landscape Preservation, SUNY ESF, and a National Park Service Partner with the Olmsted Center in Boston

Christine Capella-Peters, member of the technical staff for the NYS Historic Preservation Office, a division of OPRHP

George Curry, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Landscape Architecture, SUNY ESF and cultural landscape Project Director at SUNY ESF

The registration deadline is May 15, 2012. The cost is $40 for MAAM members; $50 non-MAAM members (payment accepted by check or credit card). More information can be found online.

The program is presented by the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums in cooperation with the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science & Forestry (SUNY ESF), and the National Park Service Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation.

Budget, New Funding Boosts New York History


By on

1 Comment

This week Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced $89 million for in New York Works funding for capital improvements at 48 specific state parks and historic sites that account for 37 million of the park system’s 57 million annual visitors. The state budget signed last week also includes $35.6 million in total funding for the New York State Council on the Arts grants, an increase of $4 million. The Environmental Protection Fund is unchanged, at $134 million which includes 9M for the Zoos, Botanical Gardens and Aquariums Program and additional monies for some historic preservation projects. According to the Museum Association of New York (MANY), there are no cuts in jobs or programs at the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, but “Parks would be down 12 jobs, to 1,736, reflecting attrition and the ongoing hiring freeze.” Funding to run the parks would dip slightly, about 2.5 percent, to $211.3 million according to MANY.

According to a press statement issued by the Governor’s office, New York Works is designed to reinvent state economic development with innovative new strategy that will put New Yorkers back to work rebuilding the state’s infrastructure. The Task Force is expected to help create tens of thousands of jobs by coordinating comprehensive capital plans, overseeing investment in infrastructure projects, and accelerating hundreds of critical projects across the state.

Parks & Trails New York was among those who reacted enthusiastically to the New York Works plan. Through a series of reports over the last few years, Parks & Trails New York has attempted to document the challenges facing the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), particularly the agency’s enormous capital projects backlog, and the economic benefit the park system generates for the people and economy of the Empire State.

On a statewide basis, Parks & Trails New York reports that direct spending by OPRHP and spending by visitors to state parks supports up to $1.9 billion in output and sales, $440 million in employment income, and 20,000 jobs. The benefit-to-cost ratio is more than 5-to-1—more than $5 in benefits for every $1 in costs.

A detailing of projects in each region of the state can be found by using the Governor’s press releases here.

Historians Should Promote Preservation


By on

1 Comment

In recent articles several authors have pointed out the multifaceted world that is New York history. Museums, historical societies, historical agencies on all levels and the local government historians all play a role in our efforts to ensure the continued importance of this state’s history and heritage. Is this the right approach or should there be a more top down method to our madness? Whatever your answer is to that question, the same divergent pattern is found in historic preservation in the Empire State. Continue reading

Rockland Lake Park Complex Master Plan Underway


By on

0 Comments

The Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) Palisades Region and the Palisades Interstate Park Commission (PIPC) will hold a public information meeting regarding the preparation of a Draft Master Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Rockland Lake, Hook Mountain, Nyack Beach, and Haverstraw Beach State Parks (together, the Rockland Lake Park Complex) on the west bank of the Hudson River in Rockland County, New York.

OPRHP and PIPC encourage the public to participate in the planning efforts for the park complex and welcome all comments and suggestions. Developed and opened to the public in the early 1960s, the parks are part of the Palisades Interstate Park system.

The public meeting will be held at Rockland Lake State Park Championship Golf Course Clubhouse on Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at 7:00 PM. Park staff will make a brief presentation about the master planning process and the park after which the meeting will be open to receive public comments.

All persons interested in the Rockland Lake Park Complex are urged to attend; those who cannot may view the Public Information Meeting Packet on the OPRHP website.

Written comments and suggestions may be submitted by April 27, 2012 to:

Mark Hohengasser
Park Planner
Agency Building 1, 17th Floor
Empire State Plaza
Albany, NY 12238
Rockland.Plan@parks.ny.gov

Upon inclement weather conditions, please visit the OPRHP website for a meeting cancellation notice and updated information.

For additional information and directions to the meeting, contact the park office at 845-268-3020.

31 Recommended for State, National Registers


By on

5 Comments

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 31 properties and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including a Lake Champlain shipwreck, a post-World War II auto dealership, and a 200-year-old Catskill inn that survived the catastrophic floods of Tropical Storm Irene.

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits.

The State and National Registers are the official lists of buildings, structures, districts, landscapes, objects and sites significant in the history, architecture, archeology and culture of New York State and the nation. There are 90,000 historic buildings, structures and sites throughout the state listed on the National Register of Historic Places, individually or as components of historic districts. Property owners, municipalities and organizations from communities throughout the state sponsored the nominations.

Once the recommendations are approved by the state historic preservation officer, the properties are listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places and then nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, where they are reviewed and, once approved, entered on the National Register.

STATE REVIEW BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS

Albany County

The Dr. Wesley Blaisdell home, Coeymans – the imposing 1838 Greek Revival-style home constructed by Dr. Wesley Blaisdell, physician and son of a wealthy landowner, remains a visual landmark in the local community and stands as a monument to several of the community’s leading citizens and families.

Cayuga County

Cottage Farm, Fair Haven – one of the oldest seasonal houses in the village of Fair Haven was originally built in the 1830s and extensively remodeled around 1880 and again in 1910, and is a reminder of the village’s long tradition of being a seasonal vacation destination on Lake Ontario.

Columbia County

The Bartlett House, Ghent — the former railroad hotel built in 1870 was at one time the centerpiece of a cluster of buildings, many of which have fallen away, that marked the intersection of the New York & Harlem Valley and Berkshire Railroads, providing a link to the post-Civil War growth of the hamlet.

Copake Falls Methodist Episcopal Church, Copake – dedicated in 1892, the highly intact example of ruralLate Victorian era ecclesiastical design was built on land donated to the group by the Miles family, which was associated with the nearby Copake Iron Works, and is now home of the Roeliff Jansen Historical Society.

The Daniel and Clarissa Baldwin House, Spencertown – built in1807, it is a distinctive example of Federalperiod domestic architecture reflecting the influence of New England construction methods brought west by the hamlet’s early settlers, who largely came from overpopulated regions of Connecticut.

Erie County

The American Grain Complex, Buffalo – the intact collection of early 19th century buildings embody the tale of Buffalo’s leading role in transshipment of grain from the Midwest to the East, and the handling of grain to produce malt for the brewing industry and flour for the baking industry.

The Automobile Club of Buffalo, Clarence – the 1910 Craftsman-style building housed the automobile club that not only brought together early automobile enthusiasts, but lobbied for pro-motorist legislation that was integral to the development of the automobile generally and of paved roads throughout New York State.

Buffalo Meter Company Building, Buffalo – the 1915 building is an excellent and largely intact example of a reinforced concrete frame daylight factory celebrated their structure and functionality with minimal ornament were highly influential to Modern Architecture.

Essex County

The Canal Boat Vergennes – a rare example of a class of mid-19th century Champlain canal boat that was archaeologically unknown until the shipwreck’s discovery in 1998, it is significant for the understanding it can provide for both the history of the Champlain Canal and the evolution of canal boat construction.

Greene County

John and Martinus Laraway Inn, Prattsville — a distinctive example of late Federal/early Greek Revival design, the inn was constructed ( in part) in the late 18th century to become one of the region’s most recognizable visual landmarks, hosted the town’s first organizational meeting in 1833, and survived catastrophic flooding in 2011.

Kings County

The Wallabout Industrial Historic District, Brooklyn –lined predominately with late-19th and early- to mid-20th-century industrial buildings, the district reflects the paramount importance of industry in Brooklyn as it developed into one of America’s major industrial centers.

Monroe County

Church of Saints Peter and Paul Complex, Rochester – built between 1911 and 1926, the excellent example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style was built by a parish organized to meet the needs of the growing Catholic German immigrant population in the city.

George J. Michelsen Furniture Factory, Rochester — built in 1914 for one of Rochester’s longest-running family concerns, the imposing industrial building was home to a company that survived the Depression, unlike many Rochester furniture makers, and continued to manufacture bedroom furniture at the site until the late 1950s.

William A. Payne House, Greece – the 1905 Queen Anne-style home was owned by William A. Payne, who made an impact on local and state commercial practices through his leadership in developing fair and uniform methods of weighing and measuring for merchants and consumers.

Niagara County

First Presbyterian Manse (also known as the Lavinia E. Porter House), Niagara Falls – Located on Buffalo Avenue, the Italianate-style home built before 1851 in one of the city’s oldest sections is one of two mid-19th century houses left in an area that consists mostly of 20th century hotels and commercial buildings.

Oneida County

Wright Settlement Cemetery, Rome – the cemetery records the lives of the families who settled the town after the Revolutionary War, which is especially important in light of the fact that physical links to the farming community were lost to the development of the Rome Air Depot in 1941.

Onondaga County

Scottholm Tract Historic District, Syracuse – largely developed between 1915 and 1940 at the transition between the streetcar and automobile, the subdivision represents the growth of single-family residential enclaves within the city, with curving boulevards featuring dense tree-cover, large lots, and a variety of architectural styles.

Orange County

Denniston, New Windsor – Built in 1875, the house is a rare and architecturally significant example of non-reinforced concrete construction in the mid-Hudson Valley.

Union Chapel, Cornwall-on-Hudson — built in 1873, it was erected by Cornwall’s Orthodox Quakers in the post-Civil War period to extend of religion to the residents of Cornwall Landing, and served as both a Quaker mission and Sunday school, at times non-denominational, before eventually falling into disuse.

Orleans County

The Clarendon Stone Store, Clarendon – Constructed in 1836 from locally quarried Medina sandstone, the rare surviving example of an early 19th century stone store played a central role in village life, also housing the post office, the town clerk’s office and the town court at different times.

Payjack Chevrolet Building, Medina – built in 1949 in accordance with modern design principles General Motors encouraged its dealers to adopt after World War II, the business known today as Hartway Chevrolet is one of the few remaining from Medina’s “Automobile Row” at the edge of the village’s commercial center.

Rockland County

Brookside, Upper Nyack – built around 1865 and substantially enlarged and modified around 1890, the home is a noteworthy example of the large villas which were central features of estates developed in the Hudson River corridor by the affluent in the 19th century.

Seaman-Knapp House, Ladentown – erected sometime near the turn of the 19th century, the house reflects both Dutch and English vernacular building traditions and was at one point used as a place of assembly for religious purposes by the local Quaker community.

St. Lawrence County

Hepburn Library of Colton – the 1912 library, notable for its rustic stonework, was endowed by Colton native Alonzo Barton Hepburn, a successful lawyer, banker and state and federal government official, who donated an estimated $3 million for construction of libraries, schools and hospitals in St. Lawrence County and elsewhere.

Schoharie County

Stewart House and Howard-Stewart Family Cemetery, South Jefferson – the 1850s home is a high intact example of a Greek Revival farmhouse and the cemetery reflects rural 19th century burial practices when family members were buried on their own properties.

Suffolk County

Riverhead Main Street Historic District, Riverhead – strategically located on the Peconic River and at the split of Long Island’s North and South Forks, the concentration of buildings represents Riverhead’s importance as the center of business, culture, entertainment and government on the East End of Long Island.

Ulster County

Ellenville Historic District, Ellenville — the historic district illustrates how forces from the development of the Delaware and Hudson Canal in the early 19th century to the role of the “Borscht Belt” era summer resort economy following the Second World War shaped the commercial core of the crossroads village.

Pine Hill Historic District, Pine Hill – the cohesive collection of late 19th century and early 20th century buildings represent the heyday of summer tourism in the Catskill Mountains.

Westchester County

Dale Cemetery, Ossining – incorporated in 1852 and laid out in the rural cemetery tradition, with winding paths set along forested gentle hillsides, the cemetery retains much of its mid-19th century plan and is the final resting place of many of Westchester County’s prominent citizens.

Downtown Ossining Historic District (Boundary Expansion) – the boundary expansion includes four contributing buildings that were not included in the 1988 nomination, but which are characteristic of the historic district’s 1840 to 1933 period of significance.

Wyoming County

First Free Will Baptist Church, Pike – the 1881 structure is a representative example of a late 19th century Gothic Revival-style church and the last surviving historic religious building in the small rural community.

Photo: Grain elevators and canal boats in Buffalo Harbor.