Tag Archives: Oneida County

Welsh Heritage Day Nov 18th In Utica


By on

0 Comments

welsh flagOn Saturday, November 18th at 1 pm, the Oneida County History Center and the St. David’s Society of Utica will celebrate Welsh heritage in Oneida County.

Participants can learn about the history of Welsh settlers in Oneida County and Welsh-American culture in the region today.

This interactive celebration features a presentation on Wales and Welsh settlers, a teacake cooking demonstration, and advice on researching Welsh ancestry.  Continue reading

New Logo for Oneida County History Center


By on

1 Comment

oneida county history center logoOn January 1, 2017 the Oneida County Historical Society became the Oneida County History Center (OCHC).

The Oneida County History Center stated that their name has changed, but their mission hasn’t – to preserve the past as a source of information and enlightenment for those who are living today, and for our descendants.  They have announced a new logo to coincide with the new name. Continue reading

The End of Marriage: Adultery in the 19th Century


By on

0 Comments

The Oneida Community Mansion House will host a discussion on Sunday, February 19, at 1 pm, entitled “The End of Marriage! Adultery in the 19th Century,” with historian Carol Faulkner about popular and official 19th century attitudes about marriage and adultery. Faulkner contends that while official society condemned adultery and polyamorous relationships many reformers condemned marriage itself. Continue reading

Chaos On An Adirondack Train: The Case Against Pullman Porter Smith


By on

0 Comments

Pullman Porter Helping Woman circa 1880sWhen the night train to Montreal set out from Utica on April 29, 1931, James E. Smith had already been toiling over the needs and wants of his passengers for many hours.  At 29 years old, Smith had been a Pullman porter for about three years.  He had done a stint in Pennsylvania and now was employed on the New York Central line of the Pullman Company.

The experience of the Pullman porter was both uncommon yet ordinary.  The Pullman Palace Car company hired black men almost exclusively as porters. This practice began under the direction of the founder of the company, George Pullman, after the Civil War. On board a luxurious and comfortable Pullman Car, Pullman porters were expected to be the ideal servants to their well off white passengers.   Continue reading

Olmsted Exhibit Celebrates Utica’s Natural Landscape


By on

0 Comments

Fort-Proctor-Park-Staircase.-Photo-Richard-WalkerIn the early 20th century, Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. (1870-1957) and Thomas R. Proctor (1844-1920) led the way in the transformation of the Utica landscape, creating beautiful and naturalistic recreational spaces that provided escapes from the city and enhanced the quality of life for its inhabitants.

“A Century of Olmsted: Utica and Beyond,” on view August 14 through January 4 at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, is the first exhibition to explore the creation of some of Utica’s most beautiful natural places. Continue reading

New Book Features Early Onondaga Co. Abolitionism


By on

1 Comment

SecedersAfter six years research, retired genealogist, one-time teacher, and journalist Alethea “Lee” Connolly has published The Seceders: Religious Conviction & the Abolitionist Movement in the Town of Manlius, 1834-1844 (2013). The book makes a significant contribution to our knowledge of the very early abolitionist movement in Onondaga County, and its interactions with similar movements in Madison, Cayuga, and Oneida counties.

Motivated by deep religious values of justice and human dignity, the men and women covered in this book defied local resistance and social pressures. They refused to be silenced in their anti-slavery beliefs. Town of Manlius Historian, Barbara S. Rivette, has called the book “an amazing feat of research.” Continue reading

Whither Tourism? The Problems of ‘Path Through History’


By on

7 Comments

PathThroughHistoryHistoric Hudson Valley announced that it is removing the animals from Philipsburg Manor for a cost savings of $200,000/year. The organization manages several sites including Kykuit and Sunnyside in Westchester County. Two oxen, 18 sheep and lambs, and chickens have been relocated to farm sanctuaries.  In addition, 13 people were let go earlier this year including the site manger of Sunnyside.

Philipsburg Manor and Sunnyside were two of the sites singled out in the August, 2012, Path through History kickoff program as primary tourist destinations in the Lower Hudson Region. I had heard about the departure of the animals through the grapevine. Continue reading