Tag Archives: New York City

Two Houses on City Island Designated Historic


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Booth HouseOn Tuesday, November 28th, 2017, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) designated two houses on City Island in the Bronx as individual landmarks: the Samuel H. and Mary T. Booth House on 30 Centre Street and the Captain John H. Stafford House on 95 Pell Street.

The Booth House, built between 1887 and 1893, is a fine example of the Stick style, which was popular in the late 19th century in suburban and rural cities. The Stafford House, a remarkably intact Sears “mail-order” house built in 1930, reflects the pattern of suburban-style residential development that occurred citywide during the early 20th century and represents an important period of technological and social innovation in the history of American housing. Continue reading

NYC Lecture: Art Deco And Modern New York


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new york art deco bookThe Roosevelt Island Library will host historian and author Anthony W. Robins, who will give a lecture titled Art Deco Metropolis: Magnificent Buildings of Modern New York City, on Thursday, December 14 at 6:30 pm.

The Chrysler Building, the Waldorf-Astoria, and Rockefeller Center are among the hundreds of Art Deco monuments during the 1920s and ‘30s and that shaped the image of New York City as the world’s Modern Metropolis. Continue reading

Dunmore’s War NYC Lecture Set For Dec 7th


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dunmore's war bookThe Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York City will host a lecture on Dunmore’s War, presented by Glenn Williams, in their Flag Gallery on Thursday, December 7th at 6:30 pm.

Glenn Williams will talk about the causes, course, and conduct of the last Native American war before the American War for Independence.

This presentation will challenge many of the misconceptions and myths surrounding the 1774 conflict in which Lord Dunmore, Virginia’s last royal governor, led the colony’s forces in a defensive war against a Native American coalition led by the Shawnee Nation.  Continue reading

Liberation: Civil Rights Event at Federal Hall, NYC


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Humanities New York will host a roundtable discussion – Reflections on Liberation: American Civil Rights Past, Present, and Future – on November 28 at 6:30 pm, at Federal Hall, 26 Wall Street, New York.

This roundtable discussion will address the role of social movements in American history and today. Leading writers, thinkers, and artists will guide participants as they cross-examine Civil Rights and other social movement leading up to #BlackLivesMatter.  Continue reading

Story Map: NYC Landmarks and The Vote at 100


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nyc landmark preservation commissionNew York Citys Landmarks Preservation Commission has launched NYC Landmarks and The Vote at 100, an interactive story map commemorating the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State through the lens of New York City landmarks.

The story map enables viewers to learn the history of more than 40 designated sites associated with the advancement of the suffrage movement for American women. Text, photographs, maps and video, weave an account of the movement in a seven-part narrative that includes sections on the mainstream movement and well as the specific contributions of young insurgents, labor activists, and African American suffragists. Continue reading

Wooster’s Bowery Hangout During Summer of 1775


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HMS Asia in Halifax Harbour, 1797Bowery in Dutch means a colonial plantation or farm. In late June 1775 – Connecticut Provincials made farm fields on Bowery Lane in New York their temporary home while British soldiers made a hasty retreat to ships in the East River.

The presence of General David Wooster and 1500 to 2000 of his men made the occupants of the King’s garrison near Battery Park uncomfortable. Connecticut men were there at the request of the New York Provincial Convention and their mission was to protect city residents from British and Tory aggression. Continue reading

Major Thomas Cole Exhibit Planned For The Met


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View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Mass, after a thunderstorm, by thomas coleA new Thomas Cole exhibition entitled Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings is opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 30, 2018 and traveling to the National Gallery, London in June 2018.

Thomas Cole’s Journey is curated by Elizabeth Kornhauser, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor in the History of Art, Yale University, and Christopher Riopelle, Curator of Post 1800 Paintings, National Gallery, London. Continue reading

Roosevelt Island Lecture: History of Affordable Housing in NYC


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eastwood buildingThe Roosevelt Island Historical Society (RIHS) has invited the public to the first of four free lectures: Eastwood and the History of Affordable Housing in New York City by Matthias Altwicker, Architect, at the New York Public Library Branch on Roosevelt Island, on Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 6:30 pm.

In this lecture, architect Matthias Altwicker who is Associate Professor and Chair at the School of Architecture and Design of the New York Institute of Technology, will discuss the history of Eastwood and the contributions of its designer, noted architect Josep Lluís Sert, then Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Mr. Altwicker will also discuss the origins and progress of affordable housing in New York City. Continue reading

NYC Event: New Amsterdam in the Dutch Atlantic


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new amsterdam history centerThe New Amsterdam History Center will host historians Wim Klooster and Dennis J. Maika who will give a presentation, New Amsterdam in the Dutch Atlantic: A Dialogue About Trade and Entrepreneurship on the 17th Century World Stage, on Monday November 6, from 6:30 to 8 pm.

Klooster and Maika will exchange ideas and perceptions on such topics as the operation of both state-sponsored commercial monopolies and private entrepreneurship, the practical aspects of arranging trade, cooperation as well as competition between representatives of European empires, the impact of “sustained warfare” in the seventeenth century, and finally, the Dutch commercial legacy in both the Atlantic World and New York. Continue reading

Marking Lower Manhattan History: Saratoga, Yorktown Commemorations


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Trinity Church CemeteryThis year on Sunday October 15, 2017at 2:30 pm in Trinity Churchyard, the Lower Manhattan Historical Association (LMHA) with other groups will celebrate the Fourth Annual Commemoration of the American victories at the Battles of Saratoga (October 17, 1777) and Yorktown (October 19, 1781).

Whereas the Battle of Bunker Hill has been celebrated with a parade in Boston since 1786, New York perhaps because of its status as a City of immigrants has been somewhat slower in recognizing its very rich Revolutionary War history. Thus it is perhaps not completely surprising that it is 225 years behind Boston in commemorating these two most important battles in the Revolutionary War which are directly connected with sites in Lower Manhattan. Continue reading