Tag Archives: New Paltz

Old New Paltz Stone House Day Set For September


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Old New Paltz Stone House Day, 1956. Stone House Day, a former annual tradition in New Paltz is set to return on Saturday, September 8th, 2018, celebrating the 340th anniversary of the settling of New Paltz by twelve French Huguenot refugees in 1678.

Seven historic stone houses will be open for public tours or viewing, two of which have been closed for many years. Performances, skits, and vendor demonstrations will take place throughout the day while artisans and craftspeople sell handmade goods. Members of the 5th NY Regiment will bring reenactors from multiple time periods, engaging in musket firing, candle making, sewing, blacksmithing, and other activities. Continue reading

Historic Huguenot Street Hosts ‘Mapping the Patent’


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1709 Draught of the Land granted to Abraham HassbrookOn Saturday, February 17, at 4 pm, Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) will host “Mapping the Patent,” a presentation of the first land survey of the New Paltz patent and its early divisions.

On May 26, 1677, 12 Huguenot refugees signed an agreement with sachems of the Esopus Munsee tribe for approximately 39,683 acres of land that would be called New Paltz.

On September 15, 1677, New York Governor Edmund Andros confirmed the purchase, and on September 29, 1677, Governor Andros issued a patent for the land and made the tract an official township. For 340 years, the tract of land was never officially surveyed – until now. Continue reading

Exhibit: Freed Slave, New Paltz Landowner John Hasbrouck


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John Hasbrouck Account BookHistoric Huguenot Street has curated a new exhibit entitled John Hasbrouck, “A Most Estimable Citizen,” now on display at the DuBois Visitor Center, 81 Huguenot Street, through June 27, 2017.

John Hasbrouck was born to an enslaved woman in New Paltz in 1806 and, later, as a freeman, was able to purchase land in the town. He is commonly believed to be the first African American eligible to vote in New Paltz. The exhibit features original records; two account books in John’s own hand, listing work he did for white farmers and how he was compensated; as well as personal notes, letters, and receipts. The exhibit is accompanied by a full-length, biographical essay written by Josephine Bloodgood, Director of Curatorial and Preservation Affairs. Continue reading

340th Anniversary of New Paltz Land Agreement


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huguenot street wigwamHistoric Huguenot Street has announced that it is constructing a replica Munsee Native American wigwam to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the signing of the 1677 land agreement between the Munsee Esopus sachems and the Huguenot Refugees.

The land agreement provided for the 12 Huguenot founders to “purchase” nearly 40,000 acres of land in the lower Wallkill Valley. The village that developed within the borders of this land is now known as New Paltz. Continue reading

New Exhibit: Slavery in New Paltz


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Hardenbergh Slave CollarHistoric Huguenot Street (HHS) has recently curated a new exhibit to explore the topic of slavery in New Paltz. This exhibit centers around wills and other documents dating from the late 17th century through the early 19th century from the HHS Archives, as well as a late 18th century slave collar from the HHS Permanent Collection. A highlight of the display is the account book of John Hasbrouck that records his work as a freeman, as well as the wages and goods he received as payment between 1830 and 1839. Continue reading

Slave Dwelling Project Shines Light on Northern Slavery


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joseph mcgillJoseph McGill, founder of the Slave Dwelling Project, will spend Friday night, September 9th, in a cellar kitchen at Historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz as part of the historian’s ongoing mission to bring awareness to former slave dwellings’ existence, history, and need for preservation.

Six SUNY New Paltz students and several members of the public will be invited to join McGill and his associate Terry James to share in this symbolic return to a time when even northern households enslaved Africans. Continue reading

Historic Treasures: Ulster County’s Locust Lawn


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Locust-Lawn HABS/HAER Library of CongressGardiner, New York, located in south-central Ulster County has some real historical gems within its borders. One of those gems is Locust Lawn which is situated on what used to be known as the Newburgh-New Paltz Road (now Route 32).

This frequently overlooked Federal style mansion, constructed by Josiah Hasbrouck, is a must-see, not only the magnificent federal-style mansion, but also the property’s scenic beauty. There is also the Evert Terwilliger house, perched on the banks of the Plattekill Creek which cuts through the property. Built in the 1730s, it’s an example of an early stone house, and is also connected to the history of the mansion. Continue reading

Gravestone Preservation Workshop in New Paltz


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HHS Burial GroundOn September 19th and 20th, Historic Huguenot Street will host a two-day Gravestone Preservation Workshop in its historic 17th century burial ground led by monuments conservator, preservationist, and teacher Jonathan Appell, founder of the New England Cemetery Service.

The goal of this hands-on training workshop is to educate attendees on the various challenges and techniques of gravestone, monument, and historic stone preservation via an interactive working experience. Continue reading