Tag Archives: Native American History

Native Travelers at the Heart of the Empire


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we explore the history of early America, we often look at people who lived and the events that took place in North America. But what about the people who lived and worked in European metropoles?

What about Native Americans?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore early American history through a slightly different lens, a lens that allows us to see interactions that occurred between Native American peoples and English men and women who lived in London. Our guide for this exploration is Coll Thrush, an Associate Professor of History at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver and author of Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of the Empire (Yale University Press, 2016). You can listen to the episode here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/132

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340th Anniversary of New Paltz Land Agreement


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huguenot street wigwamHistoric Huguenot Street has announced that it is constructing a replica Munsee Native American wigwam to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the signing of the 1677 land agreement between the Munsee Esopus sachems and the Huguenot Refugees.

The land agreement provided for the 12 Huguenot founders to “purchase” nearly 40,000 acres of land in the lower Wallkill Valley. The village that developed within the borders of this land is now known as New Paltz. Continue reading

American Revolution Tory Partisan William Caldwell


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Butlers Rangers in the American RevolutionThe name William Caldwell first caught my attention while researching the August 12, 1781, raid in Wawarsing, in Ulster County, NY. His name was mentioned again in Governor George Clinton’s public papers. It was also in connection to the August raid which, it was believed, was lead by Caldwell (then a Captain).  During this raid he led other Tories and Native American allies.

William Caldwell was born around 1750 in Northern Ireland. Prior to the American Revolution, Caldwell came to England’s North American Colonies first settling in Pennsylvania. Continue reading

Lecture on the Mohawk Schoharie Indians March 7th


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De Wilden Hoek The second installment of the Old Stone Fort Museum’s winter lecture series will be held on Tuesday, March 7 at 7 pm in the museum’s Badgley Annex.

Local historian Jeff O’Connor will present “The Schoharie Indians – Who Were They and Why Were They Here?” His program will explore the appearance of Mohawk people in the Schoharie Valley before the arrival of the Palatines. Continue reading

Laurence Hauptman On Chief Chapman Scanandoah


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an-oneida-indian-in-foreign-watersProfessor Laurence M. Hauptman joined host Jane E. Wilcox on the latest Forget-Me-Not Hour podcast to discuss the history of the Iroquois Confederacy in Central and Western New York and his latest book, An Oneida Indian in Foreign Waters: The Life of Chief Chapman Scanandoah 1870-1953.

Hauptman told the story of Chief Chapman Scanandoah, gave tips for researching the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora, as well as discussed the status of Iroquois treaties and land claims. Larry also talked about his inspiration for writing numerous books on the Iroquois. Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

New Book: An Oneida Indian in Foreign Waters


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an-oneida-indian-in-foreign-watersAn Oneida Indian in Foreign Waters: The Life of Chief Chapman Scanandoah 1870–1953 (Syracuse University Press, 2016) by Laurence M. Hauptman is a biography of Chief Chapman Scanandoah, a decorated Navy veteran who served in the Spanish-American War, a skilled mechanic, and a prizewinning agronomist who helped develop the Iroquois Village at the New York State Fair.

He was also a historian, linguist, philosopher, and early leader of the Oneida land claims movement. However, his fame among the Oneida people and among many of his contemporaries today rests with his career as an inventor. Continue reading

Commemoration of 1794 Canandaigua Treaty Planned


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canandaigua-treaty-march-2015The public is invited to join in celebrating the 222nd Anniversary of the historic Canandaigua Treaty, and learn about this seminal federal treaty still in effect, on November 11th.

In 1794, a historic federal treaty signed in Canandaigua brought about peace between the Haudenosaunee (Six Nations Confederacy) and the United States, each recognizing the sovereignty of the other to govern and set laws as distinct nations. On Friday, November 11, 222 years later, the Canandaigua Treaty will be commemorated. Continue reading

Saltwater Frontier: Contest for the American Coast


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we think of Native Americans, many of us think of inland dwellers. People adept at navigating forests and rivers and the skilled hunters and horsemen who lived and hunted on the American plains.

But did you know that Native Americans were seafaring mariners too?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Andrew Lipman, an Assistant Professor of History at Barnard College, Columbia University and author of The Saltwater Frontier: Indians and the Contest for the American Coast (Yale University Press, 2016), leads us on an exploration of the northeastern coastline and of the Native American and European peoples who lived there during the seventeenth century. You can listen to this episode here: http: www.benfranklinsworld.com/104

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