Tag Archives: Native American History

New Endowed Curator of American Indian Art at Fenimore


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Feather headdressFenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York has received a gift of $2.5 million from the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

The gift will fund the principal curatorial position of the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art as well as to create a new fund for special projects related to the collection.

In recognition of the gift, the position has been named the Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator of American Indian Art. Present curator Eva Fognell, who has managed the collection since 2002, will assume the new title immediately. The curatorship is the first endowed position in the museum’s history. Continue reading

Thundersticks: Violent Transformation in Native America


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, David J. Silverman, a professor of history at George Washington University and the author of Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America (Harvard University Press, 2016), joins us for an exploration of Native America and the ways Native Americans used guns to shape their lives and the course of North American colonial and indigenous history.

You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/184

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Native Dolls Exhibit at Iroquois Indian Museum


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Cornhusk DollAn exhibit, Handmade Native Dolls from Across the Nations, is set to be on view from May 6th to November 30th, 2018, at the Iroquois Indian Museum, 324 Caverns Road, in Howes Cave, NY.

There are over 562 distinct tribal groups living in the United States today. This exhibit will explore the vast diversity in traditional regalia, artistic style and technique through a mini display in the Children’s Museum. Continue reading

William Starna On Native People In Hudson April 19th


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American Indians in the Mid-HudsonA lecture, Natives on the Land: American Indians in the Mid-Hudson Valley, will be given by William A. Starna, on Thursday, April 19th at 6 pm at the Hudson Area Library, 51 North Fifth Street, in Hudson.

William Starna is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the State University of New York, Oneonta. He is a long-time student of the Iroquoian and Algonquian peoples of eastern North America, in addition to federal and state Indian relations. Continue reading

Dunmore’s New World: British Empire and American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhat did British imperial officials in London and their North America-based representatives make of the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore the American Revolution through the eyes of John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, a British imperial official who served the empire in North America before, during, and after the American Revolution.

James Corbett David, author of Dunmore’s New World: The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America (University of Virginia Press, 2013), serves as our guide for this exploration. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/162

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Dunmore’s War NYC Lecture Set For Dec 7th


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dunmore's war bookThe Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York City will host a lecture on Dunmore’s War, presented by Glenn Williams, in their Flag Gallery on Thursday, December 7th at 6:30 pm.

Glenn Williams will talk about the causes, course, and conduct of the last Native American war before the American War for Independence.

This presentation will challenge many of the misconceptions and myths surrounding the 1774 conflict in which Lord Dunmore, Virginia’s last royal governor, led the colony’s forces in a defensive war against a Native American coalition led by the Shawnee Nation.  Continue reading

Program on Lenape Native Americans Sun Sept 24th


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Lapowinsa, Lenape chief, 1735A historical re-enactment, The Story of the Lenape will be held at the Time and the Valleys Museum in Grahamsville, Sullivan County, on Sunday, September 24, at 2 pm.

Historical Re-Enactor Tom Riley will play the part of a Lenape warrior, painted for war. He recounts the origins of the Lenape and trace their history from the earliest times through the colonial period into the present. Riley will discuss how the land of our first inhabitants was dispossessed and their way of life destroyed by the arrival of European settlers. Continue reading

Uncovered Story: Indian Enslavement in America


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ben_franklins_worldIn 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He also played a central role in the European adoption of Indian or Native American slavery.

When we think of slavery in early America, we often think of the practice of African and African-American chattel slavery. However, that system of slavery wasn’t the only system of slavery that existed in North America. Systems of Indian slavery existed too. In fact, Indians remained enslaved long after the 13th Amendment abolished African-American slavery in 1865.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Andrés Reséndez, a professor of history at the University of California, Davis and author of The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in Americas (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016), leads us on an investigation of this “other” form of American slavery. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/139.

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New Critical Edition of ‘The History of the Five Indian Nations’


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Five Indian NationsCornell University Press has released a new Critical Edition of Cadwallader Colden’s History of the Five Indian Nations Depending on the Province of New-York in America (2017). The Critical Edition includes several essays that consider Colden’s original text across social, cultural, and political contexts.

The History of the Five Indian Nations Depending on the Province of New-York in America was originally published in 1727 and revised in 1747. In the book, Colden discusses the religion, manners, customs, laws, and forms of government of the confederacy of tribes composed of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas (and, later, Tuscaroras), and gives accounts of battles, treaties, and trade up to 1697. Continue reading