Tag Archives: Museums

MANY Museum Institute To Focus On Advocacy


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Great Camp SagamoreThe Museum Association of New York (MANY), the only statewide organization that works as both a hub for the state’s museum community and a powerful voice for the advancement of art, history, science and children’s museums, as well as zoos, botanical gardens and other cultural organizations, announced today an all-new Museum Institute at Great Camp Sagamore in Raquette Lake, NY.

Taking place September 21-24, this year’s Museum Institute features new reduced rates and a theme that focuses on advocacy. The group of presenters on hand will provide knowledge about what works, and what doesn’t, when it comes to advocating for your institution, from the CFA process to meeting with local, state and federal policy makers. The application deadline has been extended to August 29th. Continue reading

A Good Story: The Lifeblood of a Public Historian


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Tell A Good StoryAlmost everyone within sniffing distance of public history these days, in any capacity, is on the lookout for the silver bullet that will somehow “rescue” their particular site, or organization, or even the entire field, from the edge of a financial ruin.

For many boards and staff, technology has become the most sexy aphrodisiac around. Even though I haven’t yet seen it effectively used, partly because it becomes dated so quickly, museum and other sites continue to reach for phone tours, or apps, or touch screens, to add that extra element of engagement that will magically connect to those ever-elusive younger audiences that sites yearn to attract. Continue reading

Remembering 9/11: From City on a Hill to Ground Zero


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9-11 museumWhen John Winthrop was setting sale for America, he delivered a lay sermon which would become a foundational text for the American Civil Religion. Drawing on the Book of Matthew, he spoke of a “city on a hill” that the eyes of the world would be upon.

There is a longstanding idolizing of the city in human culture. This exaltation derives from ancient Mesopotamia, the first builders of major cities. The famous Epic of Gilgamesh, begins with a paean to the walls of the city he ruled. At the end of epic, with Gilgamesh’s adventures completed and his quest for immortality over, he returns to those same city walls with the insight that while the body is not immortal, the walls of the city are. In this ancient epic, when Gilgamesh clicks his heels three times and realizes there is no place like home, it is to the city to which he returns. Continue reading

Peter Feinman:
Unexpected Deaths and Historical Memory


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The General Slocum disaster memorial in Tompkins Square Park, Manhattan, New York City, which was once in Little GermanyHow should we remember 9/11? I began to think about this more as the date for the opening of the 9/11 Museum neared. By coincidence, I was invited by City Wonders to take one of its tours and I chose the 9/11 Memorial Tour. This was just prior to the opening of the museum in May.

9/11 and that tour are responsible for the recent series of posts on remembering the dead. For me, it is important to understand 9/11 in context. That means not only the historical context in which the event occurred but the historical context in which we remember historical events. Our Thanksgivings, Christmases, and Passovers aren’t the same as our ancestors, nor is Memorial/Decoration Day. As a result, I began to write about different ways and circumstances in which we remember those who have died. Continue reading

Brooklyn Museum Offers Free ’19 And Under’ Admission


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Brooklyn Museum (provided)Beginning on September 3, 2014, admission to the Brooklyn Museum will be free for visitors ages nineteen and under, according to an announcement made today.

At the same time, the museum will increase its suggested general admission fees to $16, except for ticketed exhibitions and events, and to $10 for adults sixty-two and over and for students with valid I.D. Current school group pricing will remain the same. Continue reading

MANY Museum Institute To Focus On Advocacy


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MANY Museum Institute“Museums are Essential! Let people know!” – that’s the message the Museum Association of New York (MANY) is sending in its invitation to this year’s Museum Institute at Great Camp Sagamore in Raquette Lake, NY, taking place September 21st to 24th, 2014.

“Advocacy helps museums and other cultural institutions communicate what they do, why they do it and how it is of value – culturally, socially and economically,” MANY’s invitation says. “It offers a way to impart information and develop other people’s understanding. In doing this, it increases the visibility and profile of museums, which increases visitor numbers and funding!” Continue reading

Future of Museums Conference July 24th


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squareThe Future of Museums Conference, a collaborative global conversation about technology, museums, and the future will be a free, online event held from 10am – 5pm US-Eastern Time on July 24th, 2014, and will feature keynote speakers and crowdsourced presentations.

Attendees can expect to learn best practices to implement in their museums, and will hear real-world examples of innovative practices in the field. Continue reading

Proposed Museum of Political Corruption Seeks Support


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Museum of Political CorruptionThere is a campaign to build The Museum of Political Corruption in Albany, New York. The campaign was started by and is being lead by College of Saint Rose Professor Bruce Craig Roter. With it’s motto of “it’s funny, but it’s serious”, it’s hoped the Museum will be a unique tourist attraction.

The museum is expected to serve as a reminder and cautionary tale to elected officials to uphold the high ethical standards demanded of their offices. “While there will be a good amount of humor, it will be used as a gateway to examine the serious subject of corruption in NY state politics,” Roter told The New York History Blog. “Museum goers will pay entrance bribes rather than fees, refreshments will be served at the Cozy Crony Cafe, and the museum auditorium will be called Tammany Hall.” Continue reading

New Exhibit: Archeological Explorations of Waterford


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History underfootThe Waterford Historical Museum and Cultural Center (WHMCC) announces the opening of its 2014 exhibit, History Underfoot: Archeological Explorations of Waterford at the Museum on June 6, 2014 from 6pm to 8pm.

WHMCC’s latest exhibit goes underground to explore Waterford’s recent and not-so-recent past. With the help of experts in the field including exhibit consultant Matthew Kirk from Hartgen Archeological Associates, Inc. and exhibit designer Paul G. Schneider, Jr., the Museum has created an exhibit which features objects from WHMCC’s collection as well as the collections of private individuals, the New York State Museum, and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Continue reading

The Lyon Mountain Mining and Railroad Museum


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LyMtM&RRM NYHFor a century, the world’s best iron ore was produced by a small Clinton County village in upstate New York. That remarkable legacy is shared in the Lyon Mountain Mining and Railroad Museum, housed in the town’s former railroad depot building. The cost to visitors “can’t be beat,” as they say—admission is free.

This community project developed into a remarkable facility dedicated to regional and town history. The focus is on iron mining, once a dominant force in the region’s economy. Continue reading

Legislation Would Create A NYS History Commission


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nycapitolRecently I wrote about my lobbying experience in Albany and offered a number of suggestions about what needed to be done. Those posts generated responses on the difficultly of lobbying and the need to have an agenda.  The likelihood of the history community organizing around a single agenda seemed slim.

I am pleased to report however, that there is proposed legislation in the New York State Assembly which would mark such a giant leap forward. It’s so good, I can scarcely believe it exists. The legislation is from Steve Englebright (D- Setauket).  Continue reading

Catherine Gilbert Out As MANY Executive Director


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Catherine Gilbert MANYThe Board of Directors of the Museum Association of New York (MANY) has announced that the organization current Executive Director Catherine Gilbert will “transition out of the Association to pursue new opportunities.”  Gilbert began with the organization in 2008 as Director of Museumwise and continued as director of MANY after the 2012 consolidation of the two organizations.

The board has named Devin Lander as the organization’s new Executive Director, effective June 2, 2014. “Devin brings years of legislative and advocacy work built on a foundation of museum and cultural heritage experience,” according to a statement MANY issued this week. Continue reading

What Museum Directors Can Learn From Game of Thrones


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game of thronesI’m usually the first to groan, occasionally quite loudly, when museum leaders tap into popular culture to gratuitously make their own points, especially when using the most tenuous of connections to justify otherwise unrelated programming in the name of increasing visibility.  And what possibly could the fictional, pseudo-medieval realm of Westeros, currently being fought over in its fourth season on HBO, have to teach museum directors?

After all, some of the series’ hallmarks—rampant nudity, murder, profanity, sex, and even incest (and all that in just the first episode)—tend to have very little to do with presenting the past to our modern guests, other than, of course, that it reflects the operative imperative of human nature that informs our work: people are messy, which is what makes telling their stories, and telling them well, such a terribly compelling endeavor. Continue reading

Fort Ticonderoga Awarded for Interpretive Programs


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Stuart on horse 2Fort Ticonderoga recently received an Innovation in Interpretation Award from the Museum Association of New York (MANY) which recognized Fort Ticonderoga as a leader in historic interpretation. The award was presented at MANY’s annual meeting in Albany, NY at the end of March.

“Fort Ticonderoga Interpretative Department, developed in 2011, has in remarkably short time become a national leader in historical interpretation, setting and implementing unparalleled interpretive standards,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “The program outcomes under the leadership of Director of Interpretation Stuart Lilie have seen nothing less than amazing results in attendance, school field trip participation, and increased Scout attendance. Through the creation and implementation of a unique interpretive approach, Fort Ticonderoga has defied the professional trends and has embarked on a major transformation.” Continue reading

Museums in Action Annual Conference Announced


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Albany PhotoThe Museums in Action conference is planned for Albany, March 30 through April 1, 2014. Museums in Action is the annual professional conference of the Museum Association of New York. This year’s conference theme is “STEM to STEAM” as well as “Museum ‘Must-Haves’”. Keynote speakers will include Susan Hildreth, Director, Institute of Museum and Library Services and Roger Tilles, Board of Regents, New York State Education Department.

A new addition to the conference will be Coffee Talks that will allow for directors, curators, development staff and independent museum professionals to gather with colleagues and discuss what’s important to them, bounce ideas around the room and network. Continue reading