Tag Archives: Military History

Dunmore’s New World: British Empire and American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhat did British imperial officials in London and their North America-based representatives make of the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore the American Revolution through the eyes of John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, a British imperial official who served the empire in North America before, during, and after the American Revolution.

James Corbett David, author of Dunmore’s New World: The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America (University of Virginia Press, 2013), serves as our guide for this exploration. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/162

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Ticonderoga Program: Birth of the Army Air Corps


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air service posterThe Ticonderoga Historical Society will host North Country Community College Library Director Brian O’Connor for a talk entitled “Birth of the American Eagle – The Army Air Service in WWI.”

The United States Army Air Service was established during World War One by President Woodrow Wilson. Under commanding General John J. Pershing, the fledgling service began service over the skies of France in the spring of 1918.

By the end of the war, the Air Service had employed 45 squadrons covering 85 miles of battle front. 7Seventy-one pursuit pilots were credited with shooting down five or more German aircraft while in American service, while the Air Service overall destroyed 756 enemy aircraft and 76 balloons in combat. Continue reading

New Book: The Dutch Moment


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the-dutch-moment-bookIn The Dutch Moment: War,Trade, and Settlement in the Seventeenth-Century Atlantic World (Cornell University Press, 2016), Wim Klooster shows how the Dutch built and eventually lost an Atlantic empire that stretched from the homeland in the United Provinces to the Hudson River and from Brazil and the Caribbean to the African Gold Coast. The fleets and armies that fought for the Dutch in the decades-long war against Spain included numerous foreigners, largely drawn from countries in northwestern Europe. Likewise, many settlers of Dutch colonies were born in other parts of Europe or the New World. The Dutch would not have been able to achieve military victories without the native alliances they carefully cultivated. The Dutch Atlantic was quintessentially interimperial, multinational, and multiracial. At the same time, it was an empire entirely designed to benefit the United Provinces. Continue reading

The Native American Defeat of the First American Army


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Colin Calloway, Professor of History and Native American History at Dartmouth College, joins us to discuss how American settlement in the Ohio Valley led to The Victory with No Name: The Native American Defeat of the First American Army (Oxford University Press, 2014). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/029

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British Redcoats of the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we discuss the military history of the American War for Independence, we tend to focus on specific battles or details about the men who served in George Washington’s Continental Army. Rarely do we take the opportunity to ask questions about the approximately 50,000 men who served in the British Army.

In this episode of the “Ben Franklin’s World” podcast we speak with Don N. Hagist an independent scholar and author of British Soldiers, American War: Voices of the American Revolution (Westholme Publishing, 2014). Don leads us on exploration of the “other” men who fought in the American War for Independence, the soldiers in the British Army. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/010 Continue reading