Tag Archives: Maritime History

LILAC Season Opens With Shipwrecks Exhibit May 25th


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Partially scrapped tugboats at Witte's yardThe summer season gets underway at the museum ship Lilac with the exhibit Great Shipwrecks of New York’s ‘Great’ Lakes and The Hidden Hulks of New York Harbor, on view through July 4, 2017. The exhibit opens Thursday, May 25 with a reception that is open to the public from 6 to 9 pm with a cash bar.  David White, Recreation Specialist from New York Sea Grant (NYSG) will share reflections on “The Future of Our Maritime Heritage.” Continue reading

Maritime Museum Offering Riveted Steel Structure Workshop


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The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum will offer a four day Riveted Steel Structure Workshop on May 20-21 and 27-28, 2017. In this hands-on workshop for ages 16+, participants will learn the basics to the craft of riveting from Instructor Jeff Dardozzi, while participating in the creation of a full-scale riveted steel and timber structure to be erected on site by the participants. The workshop will also include a tour of one of the oldest riveted steel ships on Lake Champlain. The workshop will be held from 9 am to 4 pm each day. Workshop fee is $300, $275 for Lake Champlain Maritime Museum members. Continue reading

New Whaling Exhibit at the Southampton Historical Museum


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sperm-whale-in-a-flurry-by-louis-ambroise-garneray-c-1840An interactive and inclusive exhibit, Hunting the Whale: The Rise and Fall of a Southampton Industry adds new discoveries to the accumulation of documentation and artifacts collected over more than 100 years to illuminate Southampton Village’s prominent role in the whaling industry at its mid-19th century height.

Whaling tools, maps, illustrations, archival images and text will be displayed with an eye toward making the exhibit accessible to audiences of varied interests and all ages. Among those whose roles will be highlighted are local indigenous people, slaves, servants, whaling captains, and the families that were sustained by the whaling industry.

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Stony Brook Harbor: A New Natural History


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between-stony-brook-harbor-tides-bookStony Brook Harbor, or Three Sisters Harbor as it was known historically, is a pristine Long Island north shore pocket bay.

Untouched by major commercialization, it has been designated a Significant Coastal Fish and Wildlife Habitat by the New York State Department of State and a Significant Coastal Habitat by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Despite these designations however, there is constant pressure to increase development in and around the harbor. Continue reading

Comments On Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument Sought


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prison-ship-martyrs-memorialThe National Park Service will hold a public meeting to discuss a special resource study for the Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument in Brooklyn.

The study, requested by Representative Hakeem Jeffries and authorized by the United States Congress as part of Public Law 113-291, will help determine whether the resources related to the Monument would meet criteria for congressional designation as a unit of the national park system.

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New Exhibition: The Maritime Roots of Modern Tattoo


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tattoo-exhibitIn celebration of the restoration currently underway in the South Street Seaport Museum’s flagship, the museum has announced its second post-Hurricane Sandy exhibition, The Original Gus Wagner: The Maritime Roots of Modern Tattoo beginning on January 29, 2017, open Wednesday to Sunday 11 am to 5 pm, at the Museum’s mezzanine gallery level, accessible from the main entrance of the Museum on 12 Fulton Street.

An Opening Reception with Live Tattoo Demonstration and a Silent Auction will be held Saturday, January 28, 2017 from 6 to 8 pm, RSVP required. Click here for reservation info. Continue reading

Buffalo’s Dug’s Dive Riot of 1863


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dugs-dive-buffaloNot much has been written about this civil disturbance that occurred on the afternoon of August 12, 1862 when Irish and German stevedores protested against local dock bosses, demanding increased pay for their work, and preventing others from working however when police responded the rioters overpowered them and Chief Dullard and other members of the force injured.

Ultimately the police regained control of the situation with gunfire wounding two rioters and arresting the ring leaders. Continue reading