Tag Archives: Jay Heritage Center

Jay Day: Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures


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the sea is not full book coverThe Jay Heritage Center will host a talk and Q & A with Charlie Doane, Cruising Editor of SAIL Magazine, the largest sailing magazine in the US as he shares chapters and personal experiences from his newest book, The Sea is Not Full – Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures on Friday, September 22, at 6:30 pm.

Charlie has completed seven transatlantic voyages, including most recently a voyage from France to New England aboard his new boat Lunacy. His other voyages include singlehanded passages between New England and the Caribbean; he has also competed in several distance races, including the Newport-Bermuda Race, the Fastnet Race and the Sydney-Hobart Race. He is one of many accomplished sailors and descendants of New York Yacht Club co-founder, John Clarkson Jay.

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Rye’s African American Cemetery Preservation Event Sunday


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Bell Family On Sunday, September 10th at 5:30 pm, David Thomas, Founder of the Friends of the African American Cemetery, will give a talk about the current efforts to preserve this National Historic Register site in Rye, NY.

The event is co-sponsored by the Jay Heritage Center, and will take place at 210 Boston Post Road, in Rye.

Attendees can learn how ongoing genealogical research is expanding an understanding of the families that are buried there and their place in the narrative of Westchester County’s history. Thomas will link the Purdy family of Harrison and Rye to two generations of an emancipated family at the Jay Estate. Light refreshments will be served afterwards. Continue reading

Missionary Lenses: Rye and Pre-1949 China Global Connections


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Ho Jay Heritage TalkDr. Joseph W. Ho, Assistant Professor of East Asian History at Albion College in Michigan, will present “Missionary Lenses, Windows to the Past: Visual Practices, Medical Missions, and Global Connections between Rye and Pre-1949 China” at the Jay Heritage Center in Rye, NY on Wednesday, May 3rd at 7 pm.

Ho’s scholarship concerns the visual practices of American Protestant and Catholic missionaries in modern China between 1900 and 1950, examining photographs, films, and image-making processes as vividly preserving traces of historical experience “on the ground.” Continue reading

New African American Heritage Trail Moves Forward


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robert astorino at the jay heritage centerIn celebration of Black History Month, Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino was joined on February 13th, 2017 by Barbara Edwards, Esq., Chair of the Westchester County African American Advisory Board, at the Jay Heritage Center in Rye, to unveil the new Westchester County Guide to African American History and Heritage and to announce this year’s Trailblazer Award winners. Continue reading

Sec. Jewell Celebrates Park Service Centennial In Hudson Valley


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National Park Service Roundtable - the next 100 yearsHow can we be more inclusive and engage future generations to be passionate advocates of historic sites and parks? That was the question at a recent gathering of national and state preservationists at Bear Mountain State Park in late August.

The National Park Service (NPS) is celebrating its centennial this year. With record breaking visitation, it is also mindful that more must be done to inspire new audiences and stewards in the next 100 years. As part of that planning, U. S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell started off on a nationwide tour of NPS sites beginning with a historic first time visit to New York’s Hudson Valley. Continue reading

1797 Fort Jay Letter Acquired By Jay Heritage Center


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john adler and his familyAbout seventeen years ago, inspired by the purchase of several volumes of a popular 19th century journal, John Adler had an idea – make the American narrative more accessible to the public. So upon his retirement, the former advertising executive launched a multi-year endeavor to create a database of articles, images and ads scanned from the iconic Harper’s Weekly Magazine.

Harper’s was the premiere chronicle of political events and literary commentary of its day, and Adler’s invention would help readers navigate thousands of stories from 1857 to 1916. One could find everything from headlines about Lincoln’s election to Thomas Nast’s cartoons denouncing slavery. This online trove christened “HarpWeek” was further complemented by academic essays and materials for educators. In 2003, Adler’s searchable scholarship “HarpWeek Presents Lincoln and the War” won recognition from the prestigious Gilder Lehrman Institute and an E-Lincoln Prize. Continue reading

John Jay Medal Awarded Historian Joseph Ellis


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John Jay Medal AwardsOn May 14th, the Jay Heritage Center (JHC) held its second John Jay Medal Dinner and recognized two individuals whose efforts have helped elevate and strengthen the legacy of native New Yorker, John Jay.

JHC’s first honoree was Prof. Joseph J. Ellis, one of the nation’s leading historians and the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation.  Ellis’ exhaustive and illuminating research for his newest book The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution 1783-1789 restores John Jay to the pantheon of nation-builders alongside Washington, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Continue reading

At Jay Heritage Center: The Greek Revival Era in NY


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Jay Heritage CenterOn December 7th at 3 pm Architectural Historian Barry Lewis will present a free lecture, “New York in the Greek Revival Era 1830 – 1850”, at the Jay Heritage Center, 210 Boston Post Road, in Rye, NY.

The Greek Revival decades were the beginning of the modern era in New York City. Industrialization hit the city by the 1830s completely changing the landscape. Wall Street was re-built for corporate headquarters including a magnificent U.S. Custom House, suburbia was born (around Washington Square), the immigrants and tenement slums arrived (the Five Points) and the modern notion of high-end shopping began when A.T. Stewart opened America’s first department store (today, it houses the NYC Department of Buildings) at Broadway and Chambers Street in 1845. Continue reading