Tag Archives: Immigration

Ugly History of North Country Nationalism Offers Lessons For Today


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Goodness has long been an admirable part of our identity as Americans. It is evident at the national level in our response when natural disasters strike here or abroad. Closer to home, we see it manifested daily in our own Adirondacks and foothills, where people donate, volunteer, and reach out to help others. Our foundation as small-town folk is one of welcoming, caring, sharing.

Along with that comes the knowledge that we’re also lucky to be Americans, lucky to not have been born in some other country where things are much different. Many of the lessons we learned in school were derived from the struggles of others in less fortunate circumstances.

We were taught to appreciate certain rights and freedoms, to speak out against perceived wrongs, to defend the less capable, and to question the directives of those in leadership positions. In some countries, those rights are viewed as privileges for the chosen few, or are not available at all. Continue reading

Underground RR Project Holding Public History Convention


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Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region will hold its 16th annual public history convention, Liberty Con 2017 – Americans@Risk: Race, Denial, privilege, and Who Matters, on March 24 to 25 at Schenectady County Community College and on March 26 at The Stephen and Harriet Myers Residence in Albany.

Attendees will be able to explore race relations, gender issues, immigration reform, white privilege, and religion, and their relationship with American history. As well as dialogue about action responses through a series of workshops, roundtable conversations, and keynote speakers. Continue reading

Irish Tea Fundraiser for Oneida County History Center


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The Oneida County History Center will host an Irish Tea Fundraiser on Saturday March 11, 2017 at 1 pm. This event features hot beverages, finger foods, desserts, door prizes, and more. Entertainment includes a vocal performance by Rachel DePalma, and presentations by Utica City Historian Lou Parrotta and Sister Maureen Deen. This event is co-sponsored by the Anchor Light Inn (Sylvan Beach), Anchor Heating (Utica), and Betty Abel-Jellencich. Continue reading

The Orange Riots of 1870 and 1871


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orange riotIn the 19th century extremely violent conflicts took place between mostly Northern Irish Protestants (Orangemen) and Irish Catholics.  The Orange Riot of 1870 began on July 12 (known as Marching Day in Northern Ireland), when a parade was held in Manhattan by Irish Protestants celebrating the victory at the Battle of the Boyne of William III, the King of England and Prince of Orange, over James II in 1690. Continue reading

Irish history Programs Planned for Sackets Harbor Battlefield


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the irish bridget book coverThe military story of the Sackets Harbor Battlefield Site is widely known, but the lives of those who served there as non-combatants are less well known. Nora Hunt and Clara Hastings led quite different lives from the Commandant’s family at the Navy Yard in 1860. Their experiences coincide with other young Irish female immigrant domestics in the northeast United States, as Margaret Lynch-Brennan relates through her research.

Lynch-Brennan presents: The Irish Bridget: Irish Immigrant Women in Domestic Service in America, 1840-1930 on Thursday July 7 at 7:30pm in the site’s picnic pavilion. This free program from the New York Council for the Humanities is made possible through the Public Scholars program, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Continue reading

Lt. Joseph Petrosino And The Italian Squad


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joseph petrosinoOn Tuesday, April 14, 1903, an Irish woman named Frances Connors leaned out of her window from the fifth floor tenement house at 743 East 11th Street on Avenue D, New York City, and discovered a man’s body stashed inside a wooden barrel.

The man, who sported a thick mustache speckled with gray hairs and a scar shaped like the letter ‘v’ on his left cheek, had been viciously stabbed, his neck almost severed from side to side. Inspectors on the scene had an inkling the man was one of the many Italian immigrants who had recently made their way into New York, and who perhaps had become involved with La Mala Vita, the bad life. Continue reading