Tag Archives: Hudson River Valley Review

The Hudson River Valley in the American Revolution


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9781438448145_p0_v1_s260x420The Hudson River Valley Institute at Marist College has released a new edited collection of articles about the American Revolution, published by SUNY Press. Key to the Northern Country: The Hudson River Valley in the American Revolution represents nearly forty years of collected scholarship on the region’s role in the American Revolution.

This interdisciplinary anthology provides essays about political and social issues as well as battles, fortifications, and strategy. The range of perspectives and material make it an ideal textbook for classes on American, regional, and military history, as well as a source for education classes learning about local history and critical thinking. Continue reading

Hudson River Valley Review Spring 2013 Issue


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HRVR29pt2_cover_onlineThe diverse articles in the latest issue of The Hudson River Valley Review illustrate the pervasive and lasting influence of the Hudson River Valley in shaping America’s destiny.

The cover article, “‘The Point’” The United States Military Academy at West Point” is on a pivotal era at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and was adapted from our 2013 Cunneen-Hackett Lecture in Hudson River Valley History.

The Review continues our commemoration of the Civil War sesquicentennial with “‘Musket Balls Was Thicker Then any Hail….,’” which traces the heroic actions at Gettysburg of Green County soldiers in the 120th New York Regiment. Continue reading

The Hudson River Valley Review (Spring 2013)


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hrvr29pt2_coverThe diverse articles in the newest issue of The Hudson River Valley Review (Spring 2013) perfectly illustrate the pervasive and lasting influence of the Hudson River Valley in shaping America’s destiny. The cover article, on a pivotal era at the United States Military Academy at West Point, is adapted from the 2013 Cunneen-Hackett Lecture in Hudson River Valley History.

The editors continue the commemoration of the Civil War sesquicentennial with “‘Musket Balls Was Thicker Then any Hail….,’” which traces the actions at Gettysburg of Green County soldiers in the 120th New York Regiment. Continue reading

Photo Research and Editing: The John Brown Photos


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It was long past the eleventh hour of my publication timetable and I still needed to get one last image to illustrate the article “‘No Mortal Eye Can Penetrate’: Louis Ransom’s Commemoration of John Brown” which would be appearing in our Autumn issue. I turned to the Library of Congress’s website, found and saved the file along with the metadata in order to be able to cite it correctly, and sent the last of the material to our designer.

Six short weeks later, the Autumn 2012 issue of The Hudson River Valley Review was out to great acclaim, and just a few even shorter days after that I received my first correction. It was about that image, and it was from Jean Libby, who had been cited in the article as the curator and author of the John Brown Photo Chronology. It was clear that I had gotten something wrong. Continue reading

Chris Pryslopski: Hudson River Valley Review Favorites


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In my last post I discussed the variety of topics and writers represented in the The Hudson River Valley Review, but the issue I am most proud of is Autumn 2010 [pdf], dedicated to exploring our region’s role and legacy of Landscape Architecture.

Included in the issue is an introduction to Andrew Jackson Downing (arguably its most influential figure in of regional and national import), an exploration of the creation of the Mohonk Mountain House and its network of carriage roads, the original call for the creation of an Appalachian Trail, Thomas Cole’s creation of his estate Cedar Grove, and a photo essay presenting Bannerman’s Castle. Continue reading

Chris Pryslopski: The Hudson River Valley Review


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As Associate Editor of The Hudson River Valley Review, published by The Hudson River Valley Institute (HRVI), I get to explore the region that I call home and to share these finds with our readers.

While our website allows us to be as expansive as our associates and interns are interested in being, it is the journal that I find most rewarding with its approximately 150 pages per issue that forces us to focus our interests and energies into a concise product every six months. The Hudson River Valley Review is published each spring and autumn, alternating between thematic and open issues. Continue reading

New Contributor From Hudson River Valley Institute


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Please join us in welcoming our newest contributor, Christopher Pryslopski, Program Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute at Marist College (HRVI) and Associate Editor of the Institute’s The Hudson River Valley Review, a peer-reviewed journal of regional studies.

Chris coordinates projects and programs associated with the core mission of the Institute, the “educational arm of the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area,” and also coordinates the development of the HRVI’s Digital Library and Portal Site.

He is a specialist in regional studies and is the author of “Cultivating the Greenhouse Complex at Mills Mansion,” The Hudson Valley Regional Review, March 1999, “A Thoroughly Modern Conundrum: Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Governor Center” The Hudson River Valley Review Autumn 2004, and “Getting to “The Point;” Design No. 26: The L. M. Hoyt House at Staatsburg,” Dutchess County Historical Society Yearbook, 2009. He is co-editor of America’s First River: The History and Culture of the Hudson River Valley.

In addition to contributions from Chris, we’ll begin featuring highlights of new issues of the The Hudson River Valley Review here at New York History as they are released.