Tag Archives: Historic Huguenot Street

Historic Huguenot Street Hosts ‘Mapping the Patent’


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1709 Draught of the Land granted to Abraham HassbrookOn Saturday, February 17, at 4 pm, Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) will host “Mapping the Patent,” a presentation of the first land survey of the New Paltz patent and its early divisions.

On May 26, 1677, 12 Huguenot refugees signed an agreement with sachems of the Esopus Munsee tribe for approximately 39,683 acres of land that would be called New Paltz.

On September 15, 1677, New York Governor Edmund Andros confirmed the purchase, and on September 29, 1677, Governor Andros issued a patent for the land and made the tract an official township. For 340 years, the tract of land was never officially surveyed – until now. Continue reading

Liselle LaFrance Named To Lead Historic Huguenot St


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Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) has announced the hiring of a new Executive Director, Liselle LaFrance.

LaFrance has served as the Director of Historic Cherry Hill in Albany for 26 years. In this role, she oversaw development of a long-range interpretive plan, including an award-winning tour, “The Rankins of Cherry Hill: Struggling with the Loss of Their World,” featured in the June 2003 issue of the Journal of American History.

Historic Cherry Hill was also the recipient of a 2009 “Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections” award from the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) and Heritage Preservation, and a 2014 Stewardship Award from the Historic Albany Foundation, and LaFrance received an individual 2014 Award of Merit from the Museum Association of New York (MANY). Continue reading

Timber Frame Research Group Visits Historic Huguenot Street


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Members of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group examine timber framing in the attic of the Jean Hasbrouck House, Historic Huguenot Street recently hosted the annual meeting of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG) at the 10-acre National Historic Landmark District in the Village of New Paltz.

TTRAG is a special-interest group within the Timber Framers Guild based in Bellingham, Washington, dedicated to serving as a center for information on the centuries-old craft of timber framing. The event brought experts working on timber frame projects on historic buildings, barns, and bridges from around the world to share technical presentations and information. Projects in such diverse locations as Myanmar and Latvia were presented and discussed over the weekend. Continue reading

New Paltz: Kasten from Mid-Hudson Valley Collections


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Jean Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721)

Historic Huguenot Street now has on display over a dozen American and Dutch kasten (singular: kast), or Dutch-style cupboards, from the museum’s Permanent Collection and selected loans, throughout the Jean Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721) and Abraham Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721 through 1741) through December 17, 2017.

The exhibition is incorporated in Historic Huguenot Street’s general tours, and three special-focus tours that will be held Saturday, October 14 (3 pm), Thursday, November 9 (3 pm), and Saturday, December 16 (2 pm). Special tours are $20. Advance registration is available at online. Continue reading

New Paltz: 17th-Century Dutch Culture Focus Fall Harvest Fest


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Jean Hasbrouck HouseHistoric Huguenot Street (HHS) will showcase 17th-century Dutch culture at its annual Fall Harvest Celebration on September 30, 2017. This year’s annual event will include an exclusive preview of two extraordinary exhibitions that recognize the endurance of Dutch culture and the history of the New Netherland Colony throughout the Hudson Valley.

The Celebration will be held from 6 to 9:30 pm in an illuminated tent on the lawn of the historic Deyo House, the site’s singular Queen Anne-style mansion. Continue reading

Exhibit: Freed Slave, New Paltz Landowner John Hasbrouck


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John Hasbrouck Account BookHistoric Huguenot Street has curated a new exhibit entitled John Hasbrouck, “A Most Estimable Citizen,” now on display at the DuBois Visitor Center, 81 Huguenot Street, through June 27, 2017.

John Hasbrouck was born to an enslaved woman in New Paltz in 1806 and, later, as a freeman, was able to purchase land in the town. He is commonly believed to be the first African American eligible to vote in New Paltz. The exhibit features original records; two account books in John’s own hand, listing work he did for white farmers and how he was compensated; as well as personal notes, letters, and receipts. The exhibit is accompanied by a full-length, biographical essay written by Josephine Bloodgood, Director of Curatorial and Preservation Affairs. Continue reading

340th Anniversary of New Paltz Land Agreement


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huguenot street wigwamHistoric Huguenot Street has announced that it is constructing a replica Munsee Native American wigwam to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the signing of the 1677 land agreement between the Munsee Esopus sachems and the Huguenot Refugees.

The land agreement provided for the 12 Huguenot founders to “purchase” nearly 40,000 acres of land in the lower Wallkill Valley. The village that developed within the borders of this land is now known as New Paltz. Continue reading

Historic Huguenot Street Hires New Executive Director


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Marybeth De Filippis Concluding a national search, Historic Huguenot Street has announced the hiring of its new Executive Director, Marybeth De Filippis.

De Filippis is an award-winning museum professional and scholar specializing in the material culture and history of early New York. She served for eight years at the New-York Historical Society, where she was most recently Associate Curator of American Art and former Manager of the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. Continue reading

A History of American Women in Song Performance


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linda russellOn Saturday, March 11, Historic Huguenot Street will host a performance by Linda Russell in honor of Women’s History Month in the Crispell Memorial French Church.

Russell’s performance, “A History of American Women in Song,” will explore the role of women’s lives in society from the 18th century to the 19th Amendment, featuring broadsides, laments, murder ballads, love songs, parlor melodies, and suffrage anthems that reflect the changing status of women in society. Continue reading