Tag Archives: Gender History

New York Women’s Suffrage Centennial Conference Planned


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Night of Terror ProtesterOn Friday, October 7, the New York Cultural Heritage Tourism Network will hold a Women’s Suffrage Centennial Conference at the Holiday Inn in Seneca Falls/Waterloo. 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of women voting legally in New York.

The Conference will take place from 9 am to 4:30 pm. The Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul, who is also serving as Chair of the New York State Women’s Suffrage 100th Anniversary Commemoration Commission, has been invited to make the Keynote presentation. Continue reading

Event Features Women’s Role In Chenango Co Cooperative Extension


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cooperative extension of chenango county womenThe Coventry Museum will host a presentation showcasing the historic circle of women leaders from 1915 to the present who helped build the Cooperative Extension of Chenango County. Attendees are asked to bring uniforms, photographs, badges, souvenirs and memories to share, if possible.

This interactive program and slide show will be presented by CCE’s Community Educator Emily Jane Anderson on Tuesday, August 30,  2016, at 6 pm, at the Community Meeting Room of the Coventryville Congregational Church, 113 County Route 27, Coventryville, NY.

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Friendships Between Men and Women in the Early Republic


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ben_franklins_worldIn the early American republic, men and women formed and maintained friendships for many of the same reasons we make friends today: companionship, shared interests, and, in some cases, because they helped expand thinking and social circles.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore friendship in the early American republic. Specifically, we investigate what it was like for men and women to form and maintain friendships with each other. Our guide for this exploration is Cassandra Good, author of Founding Friendships: Friendships Between Men & Women in the Early American Republic (Oxford University Press, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/094

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Irish history Programs Planned for Sackets Harbor Battlefield


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the irish bridget book coverThe military story of the Sackets Harbor Battlefield Site is widely known, but the lives of those who served there as non-combatants are less well known. Nora Hunt and Clara Hastings led quite different lives from the Commandant’s family at the Navy Yard in 1860. Their experiences coincide with other young Irish female immigrant domestics in the northeast United States, as Margaret Lynch-Brennan relates through her research.

Lynch-Brennan presents: The Irish Bridget: Irish Immigrant Women in Domestic Service in America, 1840-1930 on Thursday July 7 at 7:30pm in the site’s picnic pavilion. This free program from the New York Council for the Humanities is made possible through the Public Scholars program, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Continue reading

Review: The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel


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the remarkable rise of Eliza JumelShe’s the woman who dueled with Aaron Burr and won. Move over Alexander Hamilton. The life of Eliza Jumel is a tale about a woman who pulled hard on her Yankee bootstraps to make good on the American dream.

Margaret Oppenheimer’s splendid book, The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: Marriage and Money in the Early Republic (Chicago Review Press, 2015), takes readers along on a tale of intrigue, scandal and innuendo. Far from a steamy beach read featuring men in white wigs, this meticulously-researched tale paints a detailed and scholarly portrait of New York City and the way in which the city’s growth provided fertile ground for the ambitions of its heroine. Continue reading

Podcast: Martha Washington


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ben_franklins_worldGeorge Washington stands as one of the most famous Americans in history, but what do we know of Martha?

Who was the woman who stood beside and encouraged Washington? How did she assist him as he led the Continental Army and governed a new nation?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we investigate the life of Martha Washington with Mary Wigge, Research Editor at the Martha Washington Papers Project. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/074

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Remembering The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire


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The figure of death on the Asch BuildingIn his short novel, Washington Square, Henry James wrote about New York women of the Gilded Age; elegant ladies who strolled the sidewalks of the city’s shopping district, Ladies’ Mile.

These New York women admired window displays of shirtwaists, an elegant button-down blouse with rows of tiny and elaborate tucks. The shirtwaist was favored by New York women as a symbol of chic modernity. But the silhouette of fashionable ladies came at a price paid by their downtrodden sisters, immigrant women living in the city’s tenements. These newest New York women worked long hours for low wages in the city’s notorious sweatshops. Continue reading