Tag Archives: Gender History

The End of Marriage: Adultery in the 19th Century


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The Oneida Community Mansion House will host a discussion on Sunday, February 19, at 1 pm, entitled “The End of Marriage! Adultery in the 19th Century,” with historian Carol Faulkner about popular and official 19th century attitudes about marriage and adultery. Faulkner contends that while official society condemned adultery and polyamorous relationships many reformers condemned marriage itself. Continue reading

A History of Mail Order Brides in Early America


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ben_franklins_worldHow do you build colonies without women?

Most of the colonial adventurers from England and France who set out for Jamestown, New France, and colonial Louisiana were men. But how do you build and sustain societies and spread European culture—in essence, fulfill the promises of a colonial program—without women?

You can’t. Which is why Marcia Zug, a Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina Law School and author of Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail Order Matches (NYUPress, 2016),  joins us in this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast to explore one of the solutions that England and France used to build their North American colonies: mail order bride programs. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/120

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Call for Papers: Women in New Netherland


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New Netherland InstituteThe year 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York State. The New Netherland Institute is aiming to use this centenary and their Annual Conference to highlight the role of women in the development of the seventeenth-century Dutch colony of New Netherland and early New York.

The conference will convene in Albany, at the New York State Museum on the 22nd and 23rd of September 2017. Continue reading

New Book Explores History of Suffrage Statue


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the-woman-suffrage-statue-bookSandra Weber’s new book, The Woman Suffrage Statue: A History of Adelaide Johnson’s Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony at the United States Capitol (McFarland & Company, Inc., 2016), recounts the jubilation and condemnation surrounding the Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. The 7-ton neoclassical work of art seemed destined to provoke controversy; it was an unconventional form with a strange unfinished appearance, composed of portraits of real women and a mysterious fourth hump, and inscribed with a provocative message. Continue reading

Historical Journal Rediscovers Long Island Woman Architect


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tjaden-and-workmenThough Olive Tjaden’s name is not known to most Long Islanders today, a mayor of Garden City in the 1930s reportedly suggested that the community be renamed Tjaden City, because she designed so many houses in the village.

Cornell University, her alma mater, named Olive Tjaden Hall for her in 1980. The story of this prolific woman architect appears in “Designing Suburbia: Olive Tjaden on Long Island,” in the recently issued Nassau County Historical Society Journal. Continue reading

Update on Inez Milholland Recognition Project


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InezMilhollandWill the nomination of America’s suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, for a Presidential Citizens Medal get lost in the shuffle from one administration to the next?

U.S. Representative Jackie Speier of California nominated Inez Milholland for the Presidential Citizens Medal in November 2015. For the past year, the National Womens History Project (NWHP) has sponsored the Inez Milholland Centennial Campaign to draw attention to this young woman who died in California 100 years ago working for Votes for Women. The medal has rarely been awarded recently, and never to a suffragist. Continue reading

Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt Exhibit


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amarna king 1352The ancient Egyptians believed that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she briefly had to turn into a man. In A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt, the Brooklyn Museum presents new research to tell the story of gender transformation in the ancient world.

Opening on December 15, the exhibition showcases 25 works from the Museum’s celebrated Egyptian collection to explore the differences between male and female access to the afterlife. The exhibition is part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong project celebrating a decade of feminist thinking at the Brooklyn Museum. Continue reading

American Museum of Women’s History Report Issued


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amwh-commission-chairThe Congressional Commission on the American Museum of Women’s History has announced the submission of its official report to the President, Congress, and the American People.

The report contains the Commission’s ultimate recommendations on, among other items, the location, content, and governance structure of the future American Museum of Women’s History in Washington, D.C. Continue reading