Tag Archives: Gender History

A History of American Women in Song Performance


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linda russellOn Saturday, March 11, Historic Huguenot Street will host a performance by Linda Russell in honor of Women’s History Month in the Crispell Memorial French Church.

Russell’s performance, “A History of American Women in Song,” will explore the role of women’s lives in society from the 18th century to the 19th Amendment, featuring broadsides, laments, murder ballads, love songs, parlor melodies, and suffrage anthems that reflect the changing status of women in society. Continue reading

Racism and Sexism Women’s History Month Exhibition


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Soraida MartinezSoraida Martinez artist of Verdadism paintings and framed giclee fine art prints will exhibit her works at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, during Women’s History Month from March 3 to March 24, 2017.

A reception for the artist will be held Saturday, March 4, 2017, from 2 to 4 pm. All are welcome to meet the artist and have a dialogue on women’s rights, race relations and social justice. Continue reading

Mother Ann’s Birthday Celebration at The Shaker Bar in Hudson


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mother ann apronThe Shaker Museum will host celebrate the 281st birthday of Shaker founder Mother Ann Lee (February 29, 1736 to September 8, 1784), and the beginning of Women’s History Month, marked every year in March, at The Shaker Bar in Hudson, NY on Saturday, March 4 from 5 to 7 pm.

Portraits of influential Shaker women will be displayed on the bar’s walls and guests will have the opportunity to learn about the museum’s summer programming celebrating and exploring the Shakers’ commitment to gender equality and equal rights during this centennial year of women’s suffrage in New York State. Continue reading

Women’s Rights National Park Presents ‘Seward Feminism’


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seward houseWomen’s Rights National Historical Park has partnered with the Seward House Museum in Auburn who will present a program titled “Seward Feminism” in the National Park Visitor Center’s Guntzel Theater on Saturday March 11th at 1 pm.

Although often overlooked because of the national shadow cast by Secretary of State William Henry Seward, the women of the Seward family contributed greatly to the spirit of reform sweeping through mid-19th-century America. Continue reading

The End of Marriage: Adultery in the 19th Century


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The Oneida Community Mansion House will host a discussion on Sunday, February 19, at 1 pm, entitled “The End of Marriage! Adultery in the 19th Century,” with historian Carol Faulkner about popular and official 19th century attitudes about marriage and adultery. Faulkner contends that while official society condemned adultery and polyamorous relationships many reformers condemned marriage itself. Continue reading

A History of Mail Order Brides in Early America


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ben_franklins_worldHow do you build colonies without women?

Most of the colonial adventurers from England and France who set out for Jamestown, New France, and colonial Louisiana were men. But how do you build and sustain societies and spread European culture—in essence, fulfill the promises of a colonial program—without women?

You can’t. Which is why Marcia Zug, a Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina Law School and author of Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail Order Matches (NYUPress, 2016),  joins us in this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast to explore one of the solutions that England and France used to build their North American colonies: mail order bride programs. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/120

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Call for Papers: Women in New Netherland


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New Netherland InstituteThe year 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York State. The New Netherland Institute is aiming to use this centenary and their Annual Conference to highlight the role of women in the development of the seventeenth-century Dutch colony of New Netherland and early New York.

The conference will convene in Albany, at the New York State Museum on the 22nd and 23rd of September 2017. Continue reading

New Book Explores History of Suffrage Statue


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the-woman-suffrage-statue-bookSandra Weber’s new book, The Woman Suffrage Statue: A History of Adelaide Johnson’s Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony at the United States Capitol (McFarland & Company, Inc., 2016), recounts the jubilation and condemnation surrounding the Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. The 7-ton neoclassical work of art seemed destined to provoke controversy; it was an unconventional form with a strange unfinished appearance, composed of portraits of real women and a mysterious fourth hump, and inscribed with a provocative message. Continue reading