Tag Archives: Gender History

Hudson Valley Women’s History Research Fellows Sought


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historic hudson valleyThe Women’s History Institute of Historic Hudson Valley has announced they are now offering Summer Research Fellowships to support college and graduate students engaged in scholarly research connected to the women who shaped the culture and chronicle of the Hudson River Valley.

Fellowship stipends are $3,000 for a minimum of 6 weeks and a maximum of three months’ duration. Applications are invited for residence between June 1, 2018 – October 1, 2018. The deadline for application is April 15, 2018 and applicants will be notified of results before May 15, 2018. Continue reading

New Exhibition Explores Albany Anti-Suffrage Movement


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anti suffrage pinAlbany Institute of History & Art has opened a new exhibition exploring Albany and Anti-Suffrage Movement.

The year 2017 marks the centennial of woman’s suffrage in New York State.

Albany was considered a stronghold of the anti-suffrage movement. The exhibit tells the story of the women who first met in 1894 before the New York Constitutional Convention convened, organized the Albany branch of the New York State Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, lobbied to make their views heard in 1915, and lost their fight in 1917. Continue reading

Suffrage Centennial Exhibit at Athens Cultural Center


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“White Louis XVI End Chair, Women’s Rights are Human Rights” by Laurel Garcia ColvinWomen won the right to vote in New York State in 1917, but the story really began much earlier and with particular fervor in the mid 19th century.

In the 1840’s, upstate New York was a hotbed of radicalism. The “Second Great Awakening” brought with it spiritual revivalism, penal and education reforms, abolitionism and the temperance and women’s right movements. This turbulent atmosphere of ideas and events was not unlike the cultural upheaval of the 1960s.

In 1848 Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Coffin Mott and several other women gathered around a tea table in Waterloo, New York and drafted the “Declaration of Sentiments” based upon the Declaration of Independence. By inserting into the text that women, as well as men, were created equal, they renewed the revolution that was started seventy two years earlier in 1776. The protracted and arduous road to women’s right to the elective franchise took until 1917 to be realized in New York State and not until 1920 in the entire United States. Continue reading

Women’s History at Peterboro Civil War Event


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Ann Maria SchramIn honor of the Centennial of New York State Women’s Suffrage, the 25th Annual Peterboro Civil War Weekend will feature programs on women during the Civil War. According to the Civil War Trust (March 8, 2016) “women played an instrumental role in the Civil War, both on and off the field” despite the cultural 19th Century norms. “Women left their homes and served as laundresses and nurses for both armies.” “Women also served on the field, cutting off their hair and changing their clothes and names to fight in battle.” “Those women who were not in the field were running farms and businesses that their husbands had left behind – a huge step in the march for independence.” Continue reading

Event: Queer Politics, AIDS, Reproductive Rights History


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act up protestOn Sunday, June 18, at 1 pm at the Oneida Community Mansion House, 170 Kenwood Ave., Oneida, historian and author Tamar Carroll and Mansion House curator Molly Jessup will lead a discussion entitled ‘It Saved My Life:’ AIDS & Reproductive Rights Activism in the Creation of Queer Politics.

The discussion will focus on AIDS and women’s health activists in New York City during the late 1980s and early 1990s. In the face of official silence and avoidance, members of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP New York) and of the Women’s Health Action Mobilization (WHAM!) joined together to advocate awareness and a public health response to the HIV epidemic and for the right to health care. Carroll’s extensive interviews with some of those activists formed the basis for her book, Mobilizing New York: AIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism. Continue reading

Ida Blanchard: Heroic Switchboard Operator


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Fire! … Please send help — there’s been a car accident! … We found our son in the pool … please help us! … We need an ambulance … I think my husband’s having a heart attack! … My wife can’t breathe and she’s turning blue! Many of us have experienced terrifying moments like those at one time or another. In modern times, amazingly quick responses are the norm from fire and EMS personnel directed by information received at county emergency service centers.

Until several decades ago, those positions were nearly all filled by men. But for much of the twentieth century, most rural areas lacked coordination of services. A vital cog in emergency situations back then was the local switchboard operator, who was nearly always a woman. In almost every instance where policemen and/or firemen were needed, the telephone operator was key to obtaining a good outcome. She was the de facto emergency services coordinator of yesteryear.

Her importance during times of crisis was often overlooked, with most of the glory going to policemen and firemen capturing criminals, rescuing victims, and saving lives. But emergency personnel and telephone-company executives were aware of the vital role operators played on a daily basis. Continue reading

Ultimate Rift: Evolution in Women’s Suffrage Movement


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helen martinSchoharie Crossing State Historic Site will host Helen Martin on April 25th at 6:30 pm to present, “The Ultimate Rift: Evolution within the Women’s Suffrage Movement.” Martin will discuss the evolution in the movement and the role of Johnstown native Elizabeth Cady Stanton in securing women the right to vote.

The presentation will focus on suffrage efforts and the ultimate rift between the “old guard” and the younger generation of suffragists who became involved. It will cover how women in New York gained suffrage three years before the entire nation did, and this program will discuss the attention paid to as well as credit given to the younger group at that time; partially because so many of the “old guard” had passed away prior to the passage of suffrage in NY State in 1917. Continue reading

Historians Podcast: History’s Wonder Women


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The Historians LogoThis week on “The Historians” podcast, Sam Maggs discusses her book on women who
made often unheralded contributions to history, Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History.  On part two of the podcast Bob Cudmore and Dave Greene discuss the story of a debutante spy for America during World War II, Gertrude Sanford Legendre.

Listen to the podcast here.    Continue reading