Tag Archives: Gender History

Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt Exhibit


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amarna king 1352The ancient Egyptians believed that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she briefly had to turn into a man. In A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt, the Brooklyn Museum presents new research to tell the story of gender transformation in the ancient world.

Opening on December 15, the exhibition showcases 25 works from the Museum’s celebrated Egyptian collection to explore the differences between male and female access to the afterlife. The exhibition is part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong project celebrating a decade of feminist thinking at the Brooklyn Museum. Continue reading

American Museum of Women’s History Report Issued


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amwh-commission-chairThe Congressional Commission on the American Museum of Women’s History has announced the submission of its official report to the President, Congress, and the American People.

The report contains the Commission’s ultimate recommendations on, among other items, the location, content, and governance structure of the future American Museum of Women’s History in Washington, D.C. Continue reading

America’s Suffrage Martyr Comes Out of the Shadows


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inez millholland chairEssex County in upstate New York is Inez Milholland country.

Inez Milholland Boissevain (1886-1916) considered among America’s suffrage martyrs and 2016 is the centennial of her death. The centennial of the death of England’s most prominent martyr for suffrage, Emily Davison, who died  for women’s right to vote in 1913, was observed nationally.

Inez Milholland, however, is little known, even in the region where she lived, and where there are today few women elected to office. As a result, there has been an outpouring of concern that has led to action on the national level. Continue reading

Sally Roesch Wagner on the Womens’ Suffrage Centennial


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Photo courtesy the National Susan B Anthony Museum & House.This speech was delivered at the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Conference on October 7, 2016.

This is a time of great potential, a celebration of significance. The U. S. government was founded on a vision of rule by the people – not a monarch or a ruling elite but each person with a voice, a vote. But 144 years later, half the people still were not recognized in the constitution as having a voice.

State by state, women carved out a voice – in school, municipal, finally state government. NY in 1917. But federally women were still silenced. Continue reading

Sandra Weber: How Long Must Women Wait


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pickets in front of white houseOne hundred years ago, on October 22, 1916, Inez Milholland Boissevain gave a powerful suffrage speech in Los Angeles. At one point, she directed a question at Woodrow Wilson: “Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?” As those words echoed through the hall, Inez collapsed on stage.

Today, New York State prepares to celebrate the centennial of women’s suffrage and the nation approaches an historic election – a woman is the presidential nominee of a major political party. The importance of casting a vote on November 8, 2016, seems obvious, and the right to vote taken for granted. But consider that women in New York State could not vote in Congressional or Presidential elections a hundred years ago. However, after decades of campaigning for women’s suffrage, it appeared that momentum was building in 1916. One woman from New York helped spur the forces to move “forward into light.” Continue reading

American Women’s Suffrage Movement Concert in Song and Story


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sufferage-concert-castOld Songs, Inc. presents a concert of 19th–20th century songs from the Women’s Suffrage Movement on Friday, November 18 and Saturday, November 19, 2016, at 7:30 pm at the Old Songs Community Arts Center, 37 South Main St., Voorheesville, NY.

With narrative, and songs that women sang during the suffrage movement between 1848 and 1920, this two-act concert tells the story of how American women won the right to vote. This is the story of one of the most innovative and successful non-violent civil rights efforts in our country. Continue reading

National Park Service Issues LGBTQ History Study


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lgbtq-americaA new National Park Service theme study identifying places and events associated with the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified Americans has been released.

LGBTQ America: A Theme Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer History is believed to be a first of its kind study conducted by a national government to chronicle historical places, documents, people and events that shaped the LGBTQ civil rights movement in America. Continue reading

Memorial to Civil War Nurses Dedicated


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civil war nurses memorialThe Tompkins County Civil War Commission has dedicated a memorial to Civil War Nurses. Located on the Tompkins Cortland Community College campus, off of Route 13 in Dryden, New York, the memorial honors the sacrifice and bravery of those women who went to war: from the very first nurse, Susan Hall from the Town of Ulysses, who served through out the war, to those who served in camp and hospital at a time when it was believed that “war was no place for a woman.” The sculptures were created by artist Rob Licht. Continue reading