Tag Archives: Erie Canal

2018 Erie Canal Event Grants Available


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Canal Bicentennial Festival, Amsterdam,The Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, in partnership with NYS Canal Corporation is offering a limited number of sponsorships of up to $500 for events or festivals taking place in the National Heritage Corridor from May through November 2018.

Festivals and events draw millions of people to canal communities and the Canal System each year for fun, recreation, history, music, local food, and natural beauty. Continue reading

David Brooks: A Canal for the Adirondacks


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The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, David Brooks describes unfulfilled plans to build a canal linking the Erie Canal with Johnstown, Gloversville and the Sacandaga Valley in the Adirondacks.

The story first appeared as an article in The New York History Blog. Brooks is education coordinator at a state Erie Canal history site, Schoharie Crossing in Fort Hunter.

Listen to the podcast here.     Continue reading

Schoharie Crossing Call for Art 2018


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Deb Angilletta Painting Empire Lock at Schoharie Crossing 2016The Friends of Schoharie Crossing are inviting painters residing in New York State to showcase their work in a competitive, juried exhibition. The theme of the exhibition is Lock in the Fun: Recreation at Schoharie Crossing.

To recognize the centennial of the NYS Barge Canal, Schoharie Crossing will be hosting this second annual exhibition of talented artists in the newly renovated Visitor Center. This year the focus will be on paintings only. Jurors have accepted the task of reviewing the artwork and prizes will be awarded to those honored by the jurors.  Continue reading

Sacandaga Canal Project: A Short History


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documents of the senate 63rd sessionWith the opening of the entire Erie Canal in 1825, a call for more canals and other internal improvements arose from all over New York State. People in many legislative districts thought that if the state could build a canal that had already shown its great value, it could also provide infrastructure projects to help regional economies to connect with the artificial river that joined the interior Great Lakes and the global market through Albany and New York City. This was also the case coming from the legislative representatives from Montgomery County and although many lateral canals would be subsequently surveyed, planned and some would even be built, perhaps the most intriguing was one that never had a shovel turned.

As early as 1826, citizens from Montgomery County were calling for a plan to connect the Erie Canal – which already ran through the county on the south side of the Mohawk River – to the industrializing area around the county seat of Johnstown and further into the wilderness to the north for raw materials. Inhabitants of Montgomery and Hamilton Counties formally called upon the New York State Senate through the Canal Commission for a survey to be conducted and a planned canal from Caughnawaga (present day Fonda) up the Sacandaga River Valley (Journal of the NYS Senate 49 Sess 1826). The original intention was to have a canal of over 30 miles and elevation increase of 350 feet that would connect the Erie Canal to the waters of what is now known as the lower Adirondacks. That could therefore be connected to the head waters of the Hudson River and also through a series of lakes to the Raquette River and the St. Lawrence River. Senators knew that in order to populate that region of the state and exploit its natural resources, some forms of improvements would be necessary. However, their concerns grew over the expense and circuitous route the canal would need to travel. The senate forwarded the recommendation to the committee on canals were it apparently lay dormant. Continue reading

Erie Canalway Photo Contest Winners Announced


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Twelve images that capture the beauty and character of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor have been selected as winners of the 12th Annual Erie Canalway Photo Contest.

Winning images will be featured in the 2018 Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Calendar, which will be available for free in December.

Judges selected twelve winners from nearly 300 entries. First, second and third place photographs were chosen in each of four contest categories: Classic Canal, Along the Trail, On the Water, and Canal Communities. In addition, twelve photographs received an honorable mention. Continue reading

Amos Eaton: RPI, Noah and the Erie Canal


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Incorrect history marker as per RPI.eduThis year marks the onset of the bicentennial of the construction of the Erie Canal. As part of that event the world conference of canals is being held this September in Syracuse with various field trips to canal-related sites. In this post, I wish to address one aspect of the creation of the Erie Canal that often goes unnoticed: its role in the debate over Noah’s Flood.

The 1820s was known as the diluvial decade. The reference is the search for geological evidence of Noah’s Flood. The decade was on the cusp of the emergence of geology as a full-blown science in its own right with the publication of Charles Lyell’s Principles of Geology; being an attempt to explain the former changes of the earth’s surface, by reference to causes now in operation (1830-1833). Eventually there would be a new “ology” in colleges as knowledge fractured into the silos that define the modern university with diverse specialties and expertise. Continue reading

2017 World Canals Conference Coming to New York State


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Erie Canal Bicentennial posterA program highlighting some of the most innovative activities on the world’s waterways is set to take place September 24-28 at the 2017 World Canals Conference (WCC 2017) in Syracuse.

The conference provides opportunities to learn from and network with the most forward-thinking experts in canalside development, waterway engineering and management, and canal tourism and preservation.

Registration is open for one-day or full conference attendance through September 15. Continue reading