Tag Archives: Cemeteries

Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery Landmarks Get Makeover


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Miller Mausoleum The corporate team Kärcher, that cleaned Mt. Rushmore, the Seattle Space Needle and The London Eye, recently visited to Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn to give some of its famous monuments and mausoleums a special makeover.

Using cutting-edge and eco-friendly technology, cultural restoration expert Thorsten Moewes, of Kärcher, a manufacturer of cleaning equipment, removed centuries of dirt and grime from three Green-Wood landmarks free of charge: the Niblo Mausoleum (1851), the Miller Mausoleum (ca. 1870) and the Charlotte Canda Memorial (1845). Following the cleaning, a HDS 13/20 hot water pressure washer was donated to Green-Wood. Continue reading

Brooklyn Cemetery Puts WWI Biographies Online


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green-wood cemeteryTo mark the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I, Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery has unveiled biographies of more than 160 men and women, military and civilian, who served in the war to end all wars and who now are interred in the National Historic Landmark designated cemetery.

More than a year in the making, Green-Wood’s WWI Project covers the men and women who served in that conflict as pilots, nurses, infantryman, gunners, pay clerks, intelligence officers, logistics specialists, and others. The biographies were researched by a group of volunteers under the guidance of Green-Wood historian Jeff Richman. Continue reading

Grave Robbing And The Doctors Riot of 1788


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new york hospitalThe origins of this civil disturbance began in early February of 1788 and broke out in mid April of that year. Actually the City’s doctors did not riot as the name implies. However, it had its origins in the illegal procurement of corpses of free blacks and slaves and poor whites by doctors and medical students at an unaccredited surgical training school in lower Manhattan led by Richard Bailey, a Connecticut-born doctor who had studied in London.

Apparently it was expensive and almost impossible for the school to provide corpses for its teaching purposes and the professors and students resorted to stealing them from nearby Trinity Church yard and other local cemeteries including the one for people of color then known the “Negro Burying Ground” Continue reading

Essex County Cemetery Conservation Workshop Planned


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cemetery workshopThe Adirondack History Museum in Elizabethtown hosts a Cemetery Conservation Workshop for its annual Historian’s Day on Friday, Oct. 14.

Presenter Joe Ferrannini, a conservator of Grave Stone Matters, will speak on preservation, conservation and restoration issues faced within cemeteries, and then take workshop attendees to the Riverside Cemetery (next door to Museum) and demonstrate practical techniques. Continue reading

Cemetery Preservation Program Planned At Camp Sagamore


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gravestone Great Camp Sagamore will hold a two-day presentation on cemetery and gravestone restoration on Tuesday, September 27th, and Wednesday, September 28th.

For many people, cemeteries are sacred sites, locations that not only provide spiritual comfort for both the living and the deceased, but also help communities maintain connections with their collective cultural history. Over time, however, many small cemeteries fall into disrepair and decay, as loved ones move on and communities grow. For its part, New York State is home to thousands of neglected or abandoned cemeteries, many of which are technically the responsibility of their surrounding communities. Continue reading

Sumner Lark’s Putnam County African-American Projects


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sumner h larkAlthough his father was said to have been born as a slave, and was later a junk dealer in the Augusta, Georgia area,  Sumner H. Lark came to be a trend-breaking black leader in New York State who worked to establish an African-American community in Putnam County.

Sumner Lark was born in in 1874 to a father later described as “a pioneer race business man in his home town and accumulated a considerable fortune at one time.” He grew up in the Augusta area, and attended the Haines Institute before attending Howard University, graduating in 1897. He then returned to Georgia, taught Chemistry and Physics at Haines and ran a local newspaper for about a year, having edited a student-run newspaper in college.  After marrying he relocated to Brooklyn, New York just after the start of the 20th century. There, he ran his own printing business, and started The Eye, a newspaper which reported information of interest to African Americans. Continue reading

Addressing The Care of Cemeteries


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features an interview with Craig Tolosky, secretary/treasurer of the East Line Union Cemetery in Malta, with his perspective on challenges facing cemeteries in New York State. Mr. Tolosky’s daughter, Christie Tolosky, is buried in the cemetery. She died at the age of 24 from what was later diagnosed as Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome. You can listen to the full podcast hereContinue reading

Amsterdam’s Green Hill Cemetery


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features Jerry Snyder of Historic Amsterdam League talking about their Ghosts of the Past Tours, which take place in Green Hill Cemetery Friday, Oct. 23 and Saturday, Oct. 24. Amsterdam’s Green Hill Cemetery, opened in 1858 and expanded in 1865, was designed by Burton A. Thomas, who also designed Vale Cemetery in Schenectady and Albany Rural Cemetery. Listen here: https://soundcloud.com/obudmore/bryan-mackfort-plain-museumthe-historianssunday-october-11-2015 Continue reading