Tag Archives: Books

Two New Adirondack Historic Architecture Guides Published


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A Guide to Architecture in the AdirondacksTwo books published this year have significantly expanded our understanding of Adirondack architecture. People familiar with the Adirondacks know that twig furniture and palatial robber baron wilderness compounds are the exception, not the rule, for the Adirondack built environment. Unfortunately, until this year there have been no real resources that document the diversity of what really exists along the roadsides and in the settlements of the region. Now, at last, two truly amazing new books have arrived to fill the void. Both books belong in the bookcase of anyone who wants to know more about the Adirondacks.

Destined to become the reference book most often used to jog the memory is A Guide to Architecture in the Adirondacks by Prof. Richard Longstreth ($34.95, 427 pages). Published by Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) and produced by Adirondack Life this book covers the most significant buildings and structures throughout the region. Longstreth is a well-known architectural historian who teaches at George Washington University. He has deep first hand knowledge of the subject having been an inquiring seasonal resident of the Adirondacks since 1978. Continue reading

Rebels on the Niagara: The Fenian Invasion of Canada


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rebels on the niagara book coverLawrence E. Cline’s new book Rebels on the Niagara: The Fenian Invasion of Canada, 1866 (SUNY Press, 2017) takes a look at what is now largely considered a footnote in history, the American invasion of Canada along the Niagara Frontier.

The group behind the invasion – the Fenian Brotherhood – was formed in 1858 by Irish nationalists in New York City in order to fight for Irish independence from Britain. Continue reading

Unexpected President: Life and Times of Chester A. Arthur


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unexpected president bookScott S. Greenberger’s new book The Unexpected President: The Life and Times of Chester A. Arthur (Da Capo Press, 2017) is a biography of the dramatic, untold story of a virtually forgotten American president, Chester Arthur.

When President James Garfield was shot, no one in the United States was more dismayed than his Vice President, Chester Arthur. For years Arthur had been perceived as unfit to govern, not only by critics and his fellow citizens, but by his own conscience.

His short presidency proved to be a turning point of American history. This biography is the tale of a machine politician and man-about-town in Gilded Age New York who stumbled into the highest office in the land. Continue reading

Interesting Book Sale In Hudson, NY Sept 29-30


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Christ Church EpiscopalChrist Church Episcopal will hold a book sale at the church, 431 Union Street, Hudson, on Saturday, September 30, starting at 9 am. An opening reception and early buying will be held Friday, September 29, at 5 pm.

Books for sale will include recent and out-of-print coffee table and large format books in art, photography, music, dance, architecture, antiques, gardening, cooking, and travel, as well as religion, children’s, recent fiction, and history including local New York and New England history. Continue reading

Jay Day: Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures


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the sea is not full book coverThe Jay Heritage Center will host a talk and Q & A with Charlie Doane, Cruising Editor of SAIL Magazine, the largest sailing magazine in the US as he shares chapters and personal experiences from his newest book, The Sea is Not Full – Ocean Sailing Revelations & Misadventures on Friday, September 22, at 6:30 pm.

Charlie has completed seven transatlantic voyages, including most recently a voyage from France to New England aboard his new boat Lunacy. His other voyages include singlehanded passages between New England and the Caribbean; he has also competed in several distance races, including the Newport-Bermuda Race, the Fastnet Race and the Sydney-Hobart Race. He is one of many accomplished sailors and descendants of New York Yacht Club co-founder, John Clarkson Jay.

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45th Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair Sept 9th


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A customer peruses one exhibitor’s inventory at last year’s Rochester Antiquarian Book FairThe oldest, continually running regional Antiquarian Book Fair in the U.S. will take place in downtown Rochester, NY at the Main Street Armory on Saturday, September 9, from 10 am to 4 pm.

Presented by the Rochester Area Booksellers Association (RABA) and RIT Press, annually the Fair attracts an increasing number of visitors and exhibitors. Currently, nearly 50 dealers from across the nation and Canada are expected to bring rare antiquarian titles along with good secondhand books of wide subject breadth and reader interest, including scholarly texts. Additionally, exhibitors will feature prints, maps, photographica and collectible ephemera embracing equally diverse subject categories. Continue reading

Jacob’s Land: Settling New York’s Frontier


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jacobs land book coverCharles Yaple’s Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier is a archival based account of life on the New York frontier before, during, and after the American Revolutionary War.

The book is a family narrative, that follows the experiences of a German immigrant family, Indian Leader Joseph Brant, and George Washington’s Surveyor General, Simeon DeWitt.

The books spans the history of French and Indian War, the Burgoyne Campaign and Battles of Saratoga and Monmouth, the Clinton Campaign of 1779, Native Indian trails west, the early history of Ithaca, and more. Continue reading

Law & Disorder: The Chaotic Birth Of The NYPD


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law and order book coverIn his new book Law & Disorder: The Chaotic Birth Of The NYPD (Thomas Dunne Books, 2017) historian Bruce Chadwick argues that rampant violence led to the founding of the first professional police force in New York City.

Chadwick paints a picture of a bloody and violent city, where race relations and an influx of immigrants boiled over into riots, street gangs roved through town with abandon, and thousands of bars, prostitutes, and gambling emporiums clogged the streets.

Chadwick says that in the 19th century the crime rate was triple what it is today and the murder rate was five or six times as high. The drive to establish law and order involved some of New York’s biggest personalities, including mayor Fernando Wood and journalist Walt Whitman. Continue reading