Tag Archives: Art History

Major Thomas Cole Exhibit Planned For The Met


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View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Mass, after a thunderstorm, by thomas coleA new Thomas Cole exhibition entitled Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings is opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 30, 2018 and traveling to the National Gallery, London in June 2018.

Thomas Cole’s Journey is curated by Elizabeth Kornhauser, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor in the History of Art, Yale University, and Christopher Riopelle, Curator of Post 1800 Paintings, National Gallery, London. Continue reading

Beauty In The City: The Ashcan School


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beauty in the cityRobert A. Slayton’s new book Beauty In The City: The Ashcan School (SUNY Press, 2017) takes a look back to the beginning of the twentieth century, when the Ashcan School of Art blazed onto the art scene, introducing a revolutionary vision of New York City.

In contrast to the elite artists who painted the upper class bedecked in finery, in front of magnificent structures, or the progressive reformers who photographed the city as a slum, hopeless and full of despair, the Ashcan School held the unique belief that the industrial working-class city was a fit subject for great art.

Beauty in the City illustrates how these artists portrayed the working classes with respect and gloried in the drama of the subways and excavation sites, the office towers, and immigrant housing. Their art captured the emerging metropolis in all its facets, with its potent machinery and its class, ethnic, and gender issues. Continue reading

Pets of Historic Cherry Hill Event August 19th


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On Saturday, August 19th, Historic Cherry Hill will present the 2nd annual The Pets of Cherry Hill event, from 1 to 4 pm.

Participants are invited to imagine Cherry Hill over a century ago, at the time of the “Bunnie Society,” at this free, all-ages event. The event is based on the “Bunnie Papers,” a collection of children’s artwork, stories, and business-related materials which chronicle the fifth generation’s fascinating garden and agricultural club activities, from the late 1890’s through 1903. Lovingly gathered and named by their mother, Van Rensselaer descendant and Cherry Hill matriarch Catherine Rankin, the collection includes genealogies of dozens of rabbits, chickens, and other pets who made up the imaginary world successively dubbed a “kingdom,” then “republic,” and finally a “society.” Continue reading

Building Community in Schools, Museums, Historic Sites & Parks


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Campaign ButtonsSpeaking in Boston in October 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt declared, “Knowledge – that is, education in its true sense – is our best protection against unreasoning prejudice and panic-making fear, whether engendered by special interests, illiberal minorities or panic-stricken leaders.”

At a time when civil discourse and mutual respect can be hard to come by, FDR’s thinking about education inspired the teachers and other educators who planned this year’s Teaching the Hudson Valley institute.

Building Community with Place-Based Learning will be held July 25th to the 27th at the Henry Wallace Education and Visitor Center on the grounds of the Franklin Roosevelt Home and Presidential Library in Hyde Park and sites throughout the Valley.​ ​The program includes more than 15 workshops and five all-day field experiences.  Continue reading

Suffrage Centennial Exhibit at Athens Cultural Center


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“White Louis XVI End Chair, Women’s Rights are Human Rights” by Laurel Garcia ColvinWomen won the right to vote in New York State in 1917, but the story really began much earlier and with particular fervor in the mid 19th century.

In the 1840’s, upstate New York was a hotbed of radicalism. The “Second Great Awakening” brought with it spiritual revivalism, penal and education reforms, abolitionism and the temperance and women’s right movements. This turbulent atmosphere of ideas and events was not unlike the cultural upheaval of the 1960s.

In 1848 Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Coffin Mott and several other women gathered around a tea table in Waterloo, New York and drafted the “Declaration of Sentiments” based upon the Declaration of Independence. By inserting into the text that women, as well as men, were created equal, they renewed the revolution that was started seventy two years earlier in 1776. The protracted and arduous road to women’s right to the elective franchise took until 1917 to be realized in New York State and not until 1920 in the entire United States. Continue reading

Lost Newburgh Composer Willie Fullerton


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Fullerton MansionJudge Fullerton’s brick, Italianate home has quietly presided over the northern end of Grand Street in Newburgh, New York, since 1868, but the once-famous trial lawyer has long since been forgotten. Visitors sometimes inquire about ghosts or secret passageways or buried caches of coins. I tell them all the same thing: the real treasure is in the history. In this respect, I have been richly rewarded.

Hidden away beneath the visible architecture was a cornucopia of stories. Some took place on the historical stage; others on theatrical stages; some were once known to the world at large, at a time when telegraph wires strung along railroad lines turned locally-printed newspapers into “mass media”; others are deeply personal, private stories of success, failure and loss.

But above all, I found Willie. Continue reading

Hudson River School Painters Presentation In Hudson


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hudson river painting by sanford giffordThe Columbia County Historical Society and Historic Hudson will host The Hudson River School (1825-1875), a Slide Show and Conversation with Peter Jung on Sunday,  June 25, 2017. An opening reception will begin at 4:30 pm, the lecture will begin at 5 pm.

The mid-19th century landscape painters of the Hudson River Valley depicted the new American landscape in terms where humans and nature were united in peaceful co-existence. These realist paintings were quite detailed, and often combined many images from diverse natural scenes and vistas observed along the Hudson River as well as the extended geography including the Catskills and Adirondacks. Continue reading

Guide to NYC’s Art Deco Architectural Treasures Published


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Of all the world’s cities, perhaps none is so defined by its Art Deco architecture as New York. Anthony W. Robins’ new book New York Art Deco: A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture (SUNY Press, 2017) leads readers step-by-step past the monuments of the 1920s and 30s that recast New York as the world’s modern metropolis.

Robins’ new guide includes an introductory essay describing the Art Deco phenomenon, followed by eleven walking tour itineraries in Manhattan each accompanied by a map designed by New York cartographer John Tauranac and a survey of Deco sites across the four other boroughs. Also included is a photo gallery of sixteen color plates by Art Deco photographer Randy Juster. Continue reading