Tag Archives: Architecture

Preservation of Unique Long Island Schoolhouse Underway


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modern-times-schoolThe Brentwood Historical Society has made the preservation of the Modern Times School in Brentwood, Suffolk County, Long Island the primary mission of the group for the past five years.

In 2012, the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation awarded a grant in the amount of $72,290.00 for preservation, matching funds already raised by the historical society. The grant is expected to allow work to start. Continue reading

National Parks Leasing Jacob Riis Beach Facilities


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jacob-riis-park-boardwalk-and-bathhouseNational Parks of New York Harbor’s Gateway National Recreation Area has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to lease Jacob Riis Beach facilities for adaptive reuse.

The facilities include the historic one story Jacob Riis Beach Entry Pavilion, a portion of the Jacob Riis Beach Bathhouse (excluding the area on the first and second floor of the east wing that currently houses NPS lifeguards), a portion of the East Wing Pavilion Building (excluding the northern half of the building, which contains NPS maintained public restrooms) and a portion of the Courtyard (excluding the area set aside for use by the NPS). Continue reading

1930s Gotham Rising: New York Skyscrapers


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1930 skyscraperThe skyscraper can trace its ancestry back many years, millennia in fact, before the existence of New York City. The book of Genesis tells the story of Babel, the Babylonian city in which Noah’s descendants tried to erect the mythological tower: ‘Come, let us build for ourselves a city, and a tower whose top will reach into Heaven.’ For their presumption the people were punished: their words were made incomprehensible to one another. This aetiological tale of the diversity of speech could easily be applied to New York, home to the speakers of some 800 languages, a city in which cab drivers routinely set their satnavs to Russian, Bengali or Serbo-Croatian. Continue reading

History Underground: Old Wooden Water Pipes


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wooden water pipes 1 When you turn on your kitchen faucet you probably don’t give it much thought, yet it’s a marvel of modern history.

For centuries, to get water into the house it was necessary to fill your buckets from a fast moving stream and lug them home. Later, you might have filled them from a well or cistern, but still had the chore of lugging them back to the house. Every drop of water you wanted for drinking, cooking or washing had to be transported this way and it was a seemingly endless task. In winter, you might have to carry an axe with you so you could break through the ice that had formed overnight. Here in the Adirondacks, wells were sometimes dug right under the house so getting water wouldn’t be quite so arduous, especially in winter. Common indoor plumbing with water to a faucet didn’t arrive in most homes in the Adirondacks until the 20th century. But there were exceptions, one of which was the LeRay Mansion near the town of Leraysville in Jefferson County. Continue reading

Adirondack Architectural Preservation Awards Announced


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the-restored-barn-at-nettle-meadow-farm-a-preservation-award-winnerAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the region’s historic preservation organization, will be presenting its Annual Preservation Awards on Monday, October 3 to eight projects that exemplify the preservation work being done in communities throughout the Adirondacks. These awards are meant to honor the best examples of sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and demonstrated long-term stewardship by individuals, organizations, local governments and businesses. Continue reading

Rhinebeck: Our Time At Fox Hollow Farm


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our time at foxhollow farmDavid Byars’ new book, Our Time at Foxhollow Farm a Hudson Valley Family Remembered (SUNY Press, 2016) is a pictorial history of a wealthy Hudson Valley family in the early decades of the twentieth century. Illustrated with the family’s extensive collection of personal albums compiled during the nascent years of photography, it provides a fascinating insight into the regional, social, and architectural history of the era. Continue reading

Hudson Valley Ruins Photo Exhibit Opens at NYS Museum


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NYTrapRockCorpThe New York State Museum has opened “Hudson Valley Ruins,” a photography and architecture exhibition.

On display through December 31, 2017, the exhibition features over 80 photographs by Robert Yasinsac and Thomas Rinaldi documenting forgotten historic sites and cultural treasures in the Hudson River Valley.

The exhibition is based on Yasinsac and Rinaldi’s 2006 book, Hudson Valley Ruins: Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape. In addition to great river estates, the book and exhibition profiles sites meaningful to everyday life in the Hudson Valley: churches, hotels, commercial and civic buildings, mills, and train stations. The exhibition explores many of these abandoned places and also revisits several sites that have changed in the past ten years since the book’s publication. Continue reading

Historic Clubs and Hotels of the Hamptons Lecture Thursday


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the irving hotel 1920Before they built their own ample cottages, summer visitors to the Hamptons could choose from a variety of hotels and clubs ready to welcome them. On Thursday, August 18th at 5:30 pm in Southampton, Long Island, Anne Surchin will discuss this early period of Hamptons history and the leisure activities that drew the first vacationists to what would later become one of America’s great resort destinations. Continue reading

Exhibit: Frederic Church’s Summer House at Olana


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olanas summer houseDavid McAlpin, a principal at Fradkin & McAlpin Architects, is among a group of 21 noted architects and landscape architects, including Steven Holl, Laurie D. Olin, Peter Pennoyer and Diana Balmori, who have been invited to solve a mystery that is more than 130 years old.

Each was asked to submit a design for “the Summer House” at Olana, the Hudson, New York, estate of the great American landscape artist Frederic Church. Continue reading