Tag Archives: AmRev

Jacob’s Land: Settling New York’s Frontier


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jacobs land book coverCharles Yaple’s Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier is a archival based account of life on the New York frontier before, during, and after the American Revolutionary War.

The book is a family narrative, that follows the experiences of a German immigrant family, Indian Leader Joseph Brant, and George Washington’s Surveyor General, Simeon DeWitt.

The books spans the history of French and Indian War, the Burgoyne Campaign and Battles of Saratoga and Monmouth, the Clinton Campaign of 1779, Native Indian trails west, the early history of Ithaca, and more. Continue reading

Battle of Brooklyn Commemoration Planned August 26-27


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The Green-Wood Historic Fund is commemorating the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn with a weekend of events on Saturday and Sunday, August 26-27, 2017.

Fought on August 27, 1776 across Brooklyn, including land that is now part of Green-Wood Cemetery, it was the first battle of the American Revolution to be waged after the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

In terms of the total number of British and American troops poised and ready to fight, this was the largest battle of the Revolution. Continue reading

Bennington Battle Day: Free Admission To VT Historic Sites


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mount independence historic siteAugust 16 is a Vermont State Holiday commemorating Bennington Battle Day and the victory over the British on August 16, 1777.

To celebrate this Revolutionary War victory, admission is free on August 16th to the Bennington Battle Monument, Chimney Point (Addison), Mount Independence (Orwell), President Calvin Coolidge (Plymouth), and Justin Morrill (Strafford) Vermont State Historic Sites.

For further information, visit the Vermont State-owned Historic Sites website.

Photo: Mount Independence Historic Site, courtesy Vermont.gov.

The Common Cause of the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow do you get people living in thirteen different colonies to come together and fight for independence?

What ideas and experiences would even unite them behind the fight?

Patriot leaders asked themselves these very questions, especially as the American Revolution turned from a series of political protests against imperial policies to a bloody war for independence. What’s more, Patriot leaders also asked themselves once we find these ideas and experiences, how do we use them to unite the American people?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Robert Parkinson, an Assistant Professor of History at Binghamton University and author of the award-winning book, The Common Cause: Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution (UNCPress, 2016), has some ideas for how patriot leaders answered these questions. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/144

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Philip Schuyler: A Time to Remember


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Philip Schuyler 1881A recent post on here on The New York History Blog previewed Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton events at the Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site this month.

A recent article by Paul Grondahl, Director of the New York State Writer’s Institute, in the Albany Times Union noted that Schuyler Mansion is experiencing a spike in attendance due to the “Hamilton effect” – “a mysterious affliction created by Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical that altered the lives of countless unsuspecting fans with a powerful history lesson embedded in hypnotic, rhyming lyrics and a hip-hop beat.”

It is notable that Hamilton, Schuyler’s son-in-law, who spent only a few years at Schuyler Mansion, is boosting popular attendance there. Continue reading

American Independence: A Declaration in Draft


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ben_franklins_worldThe Declaration of Independence stands first in a series of documents that founded the United States. It also stands as an early step in the long process of establishing a free, independent, and self-governing nation. Since 1776, more than 100 nation-states and freedom organizations have used the Declaration of Independence as a model for their own declarations and proclamations of independence.

Given the Declaration of Independence’s important place in the hearts and minds of peoples around the world, we need to go behind its parchment and explore just how the Declaration of Independence came to be.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore how the Second Continental Congress drafted the Declaration of Independence. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/141

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