Tag Archives: AmRev

Lakes to Locks Passage: New York’s Great Northeast Journey


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Lakes to Locks Passage has completed the third in the series of Waterways of War guidebooks. Waterways of War: The Turning Point of the American Revolution focuses on the 1777 northern campaign of British General John Burgoyne. The book is also the centerpiece of a broader initiative to develop the Turning Point Trail, a narrated driving tour from Plattsburgh to Albany. Continue reading

The Road to Concord, 1775


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ben_franklins_worldHow did the colonists of Massachusetts go from public protests meant to shame government officials and destroy offending property, to armed conflict with British Regulars in Lexington and Concord?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, John Bell, the prolific blogger behind Boston1775.net and the author of The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War, (Westholme Publishing, 2016), leads us on an investigation of what brought colonists and redcoats to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/129

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Revolutionary War Reenactment at Historic Huts in New Windsor


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revolutionary war reenactmentThe Brigade of the American Revolution will occupy the historic huts in New Windsor on April 30 from 10 am to 4 pm. A weapons firing demonstration takes place at 2 pm with uniformed soldiers firing muskets and maneuvering to the music of fifes and drums.

An 18th century marvel, the Continental Army winter encampment at New Windsor was constructed in about a month. Over 7,000 soldiers and their family members created the second largest community in New York, only New York City was larger. Visitors will meet some of the inhabitants of this city as well as the armed forces of the King of Great Britain and Parliament.  Authentically dressed members of the Brigade of the American Revolution use this time to teach the latest knowledge in recreating life from that era. Through lectures and demonstrations, a wide variety of 18th century period life is revealed. New Windsor Cantonment site staff is present to do musket firings and presentations on military medicine throughout the day. Continue reading

American Revolutions: A Continental History


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ben_franklins_worldHistorians often portray the American Revolution as an orderly, if violent, event that moved from British colonists’ high-minded ideas about freedom  to American independence from Great Britain and the ratification of the Constitution of 1787.

But was the American Revolution an orderly event that took place only between Great Britain and her North American colonists? Was it really about high-minded ideas?

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Alan Taylor joins us on Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History to explore the American Revolution as a Continental event with details from his book, American Revolutions: A Continental History. 1750-1804 (W.W. Norton & Company, 2016). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/128

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American Revolution Tory Partisan William Caldwell


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Butlers Rangers in the American RevolutionThe name William Caldwell first caught my attention while researching the August 12, 1781, raid in Wawarsing, in Ulster County, NY. His name was mentioned again in Governor George Clinton’s public papers. It was also in connection to the August raid which, it was believed, was lead by Caldwell (then a Captain).  During this raid he led other Tories and Native American allies.

William Caldwell was born around 1750 in Northern Ireland. Prior to the American Revolution, Caldwell came to England’s North American Colonies first settling in Pennsylvania. Continue reading

Interview: Michael Perazzini, Johnson Hall Historic Site


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Michael Perazzini, Senior Interpreter at Johnson Hall State Historic Site at Johnstown in Fulton County, joined host Jane E. Wilcox on The Forget-Me-Not Hour to talk about the 18th century history of the Mohawk Valley, with a focus on Sir William Johnson’s role in the Mohawk Valley, his Mohawk consort Molly Brant, the Iroquois and early European settlers in the Valley, and their experiences during the American Revolution. The Mohawk Valley’s history during the war was particularly tumultuous. Michael spotlighted what happened to the Loyalists during and after the war as well and talked about what records can help in researching Mohawk Valley Loyalist ancestors during this period. Continue reading

Ben Franklin’s World: The Tea Crisis of 1773


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ben_franklins_worldOn December 16, 1773, the colonists of Boston threw 342 chests of English East India Company tea into Boston Harbor, an act we remember as the “Boston Tea Party.”

Have you ever wondered what drove the Bostonians to destroy the tea? Or whether they considered any other less destructive options for their protest?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Mary Beth Norton, the Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History at Cornell University, takes us through the Tea Crisis of 1773. You can listen here: benfranklinsworld.com/112

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