Tag Archives: American Revolution

Margaret Beekman Livingston: The Old Lady of Clermont


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Margaret Beekman Livingston "The Old Lady of ClermontThe Columbia County Historical Society Volunteers will host a talk, “The Old Lady of Clermont,” on Tuesday afternoon, February 16, 2016.

This free program, presented by Kjirsten Gustavson will begin at 3 pm at the McNary Center of St Paul’s, 6 Sylvester Street in Kinderhook, NY.

Margaret Beekman Livingston was a key figure in the history of Clermont. The mother of several prominent statesmen and shapers of the American Revolution, Margaret has an interesting story of her own. Continue reading

Washington’s Spies: America’s First Spy Ring


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore espionage during the American Revolution and the origins and operations of the Culper Spy Ring with Alexander Rose, author of Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring (Bantam, 2007) and a historian, writer, and producer for AMC’s television drama TURN. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/065 Continue reading

Newburgh’s Tower of Victory Needs Restoration


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Tower of Victory 1906-Library of CongressJonathan Hasbrouck III will forever be known as the Hasbrouck who lost the “Old-Headquarters” home (Washington’s Headquarters in 1782-1783) in Newburgh by foreclosure. The State of New York took control of the home and in 1850 made it the first publicly owned historic site in the nation.

Jonathan Hasbrouck III hoped to save it the home from foreclosure, and even proposed a monument on the grounds over four decades before the current Tower of Victory was erected. Today, that tower is in desperate need of restoration. Continue reading

The Bill of Rights on the Ben Franklin’s World podcast


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ben_franklins_worldDid you know that when James Madison originally proposed the Bill of Rights, it consisted of 36 amendments and that the House of Representatives did not want to consider or debate Madison’s proposed amendments to the Constitution?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore the Bill of Rights and its ratification with Carol Berkin, author of The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure America’s Liberties (Simon and Schuster, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/062

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George Washington in Retirement


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ben_franklins_worldIf you had only six years to enjoy retirement what would you do?

Would you improve your plantation? Build canals? Or work behind-the-scenes to unite your country by framing a new central government?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore George Washington’s brief retirement from public service with Edward Larson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History and author of The Return of George Washington, 1783-1789 (William Morrow, 2014). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/061

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Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela


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ben_franklins_worldDid George Washington start the French and Indian War?

Why should we remember a battle that took place over 260 years ago?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we investigate the answers to those questions as we explore the Battle of the Monongahela with David Preston, author of Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/060

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How We Remember the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhy do we choose to remember the American Revolution as a glorious event that had almost universal, colonial support when in fact, the Revolution’s events were bloody, violent, and divisive?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore our memory of the American Revolution and how our memory of the event and its participants evolved with Andrew Schocket, author of Fighting Over the Founders: How We Remember the American Revolution (NYU Press, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/058

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New York City’s ‘Evacuation Day’ Planned


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Evacuation_of_New_York_by_the_BritishOn November 25, 1783 George Washington’s Continental army marched into New York City officially ending the Revolutionary War. Like much else about the war, the ceremonies that day were marked by controversy, but also triumph.

More than two and a half years after the joint French/American victory at Yorktown in 1781, after much wrangling over issues such as the status of New York’s numerous Tories and runaway slaves fighting for the British, Washington and British Governor Guy Carleton had agreed on arrangements for the British to turn over New York City, their last enclave in North America to the Continental army. By prearrangement, on the morning of November 25, 1783, Washington was to march down Broadway and take control of the City, just after the British and their supporters completed their withdrawal. Continue reading

The Revolutionary War And The Mohawk Valley


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features Brian Mack of the Fort Plain Museum in the Mohawk Valley who has led an effort on social media to draw attention to the region’s importance during the American Revolution. Through social media and the launch of a yearly conference, Mack and Norm Bollen of the Fort Plain Museum have reached out to historic sites clustered near Exit 29 of the New York State Thruway. You can listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Betsy Ross & The Making Of America


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ben_franklins_worldHow did every day men and women experience life in colonial America?

How did the American Revolution transform their work and personal lives?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore the answers to those questions by investigating the life of Betsy Ross with Marla Miller, professor of history at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and author of Betsy Ross and the Making of America (Henry Holt & Co, 2010). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/050

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The 2nd New-York Provincial Battalion (1775)


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philphotoOn Thursday, October 8, 2015, at 6:30 pm, Philip D. Weaver will give a presentation on the 2nd NY Provincial Battalion in the American Revolution. Several soldiers of this battalion came from the Mohawk Valley area especially the Palatine District.

Phil will discuss how only a small number of this regiment would continue in the Continental Army after the disastrous Canadian Campaign and even fewer would serve until the end of the war. Continue reading

Enemy Captives of the War for Independence


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore the day-to-day experiences of British and German POWs during the War for Independence with Ken Miller, Associate Professor of History at Washington College and author of Dangerous Guests: Enemy Captives and Revolutionary Communities during the War for Independence (Cornell, 2014). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/048

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England and the American Revolution


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features British journalist Nick Bunker, author of An Empire on the Edge: How Britain Came to Fight America. (Vintage Books, 2015). The book is a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Bunker takes a detailed look at English politics, economics and culture before and during the American Revolution. Listen at “The Historians” online archive here.
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‘Five Formidable Forts’ Tour Set For September


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Crown Point - Photo by John WarrenThe public is invited to take a once-ever packaged tour, on Saturday, September 12, 2015, of Champlain lake shore sites where five military forts were built between 238 and 325 years ago.

Historians will lead guests on a tour of the archaeological sites of two early forts (1660, 1731) at Chimney Point in Addison, Vermont; the ruins of two forts (1734, 1759) in Crown Point, New York; and a Revolution War fort site (1776) in Orwell, Vermont. Continue reading

Free Admission to Saratoga Battlefield Tuesday


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Saratoga Battlefield and Hudson RiverThe National Park Service is turning 99 years old on August 25, 2015 and everyone is getting a present – free admission!

Saratoga National Historical Park’s celebration on Tuesday features a Fort Ticonderoga Fife and Drums concert at noon, musket firings throughout the day and discounts in the museum bookstore. Also available is free entrance to drive or bicycle the scenic tour road and hike the historic trails. Continue reading

The Mystery of William Johnson’s ‘Fish House’


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47One of the real pleasures in researching and writing When Men and Mountain Meet was exploring the actual sites of the historic places mentioned in my book: the little town of Castorland on the Black River, the LeRay Mansion at Fort Drum, Gouverneur Morris’ Mansion at Natural Dam and David Parish’s house, now the Remington Art Museum, in Ogdensburg. And then there was finding Zephaniah Platt’s grave in the Riverside Cemetery in Plattsburgh, in Lake Placid the site of the 1813 Elba Iron and Steel Manufacturing works , Charles Herreshoff’s flooded iron ore mine in Old Forge and the complex of building foundations that made up John Thurman’s 1790 development at Elm Hill.

There was one site, however, that was a little harder to locate than the others; Sir William Johnson’s fishing camp “Fish House”. Continue reading