Tag Archives: Albany

Bruce Dearstyne: Highlighting Albany’s Heritage


By on

2 Comments

1024px-North_Pearl_Street_Albany_1800sAlbany is a historic city! Its website includes a history of the city. Kathy Sheehan, campaigning for Mayor in 2012, cited its “deep and palpable history” as one of its assets and one of the bases for its potential development in the future. As Mayor, she initiated the Albany Heritage Tourism Initiative and gave a very impressive talk on “Albany: Our History, Our Future,” emphasizing its potential for heritage tourism at the kick-off luncheon for New York History Month organized by the University Club in November 2014.

One of her key themes was connections — among Albany’s historical buildings, its history organizations such as the Albany Institute of History and Art, and state sites such as the State Museum and Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site. Continue reading

Genealogy in the Capital District


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week’s topic on “The Historians” podcast is genealogy, three interviews recorded with members of the Capital District Genealogical Society.

The program features Eric Johnson on African American history; Terri Moran with a family history that stretches to Sweden; and Jim Richmond, whose family research inspired him to write a book, The Middleline, the story of the founding of a Saratoga County community. You can listen at “The Historians” online archiveContinue reading

Early Years Of Steamboating On The Hudson


By on

6 Comments

 

800px-Robert_R_Livingston,_attributed_to_Gilbert_Stuart_(1755-1828)In 1798, Robert R. Livingston, Jr. (1746-1813) requested and obtained a monopoly from the New York State Legislature granting him the exclusive right to operate passenger steamboats on the Hudson River.

The Livingston family was very wealthy and owned the large estate, Clermont, just south of Albany. They ran an iron foundry and machine shop for many years where they had installed a steam engine to power the equipment. Continue reading

A Few Tickets Left For ‘Rail, River, Hudson!’ Event


By on

1 Comment

rail_river_hudson_composite_for_2015_promoOn Saturday, July 11, the publishers of AllOverAlbany.com will lead a full day excursion called “Rail, River, Hudson!” The journey begins with a 25-minute train ride by Amtrak from Rensselaer to the City of Hudson, and ends with a 2.5-hour sunset cruise from Hudson back to Albany on board the Dutch Apple II riverboat. Only a few tickets remain for this event, which sold out in 2014.

“Taking a day trip down the Hudson Valley by train or riverboat was the Saturday thing to do in Albany until the 1940s,” said Mary Darcy, one of the publishers of All Over Albany. “We’re making it possible for people today to experience what that was like. And it’s a lot of fun.” Continue reading

Civil War Albany Rises To Action


By on

0 Comments

Shipment of Guns and Ammunition from the Watervliet ArsenalAs had happened during the French and Indian War and later the Revolutionary War, from the first days of the Civil War Albany was converted into a military camp. Lincoln’s original request for troops designated Albany, New York City and Elmira as military marshaling points. Troops from the entire northeast, including upstate New York as far west as Buffalo, east to Vermont, New Hampshire and western Massachusetts reported to Albany. Continue reading

A Short Biography of Engineer Benjamin Prescott


By on

0 Comments

Pipes of the Albany Water Works excavated by Wolfert Roost CC circa late 1980s002The Wolfert’s Roost Country Club in Albany maintains a small dam, pond, and pump house to provide water for their golf course. In the 1980s workers excavating the pond, which is fed by the Maezlandtkill, discovered several sections of ancient wooden and very early cast iron pipe along with iron bands. The pipe and other artifacts were placed in the woods near the club’s tennis courts and forgotten.

Benjamin Prescott, engineer of Albany’s first municipal water system and the man responsible for those pipes, is all but equally forgotten, despite an illustrious career in engineering.  Prescott served as an Engineer in the American Revolution, Superintendent of the Springfield Armory, and was the designer of several notable projects, including one of this nation’s first inclined planes (on the Connecticut River). He also conducted a 1790s survey of Niagara Falls, consulted on the Erie Canal, designed the Troy Sloop Lock (the Federal Dam) and more. Continue reading

The First Days of the Civil War in Albany


By on

1 Comment

Fort Sumter Newspaper HeadlineEarly Sunday morning on April 14, 1861, barely two months after Lincoln left Albany, news arrived there that Fort Sumter had been fired on and surrendered. Fort Sumter was not far from Washington, and this news hit Albany like a shock wave.

New York State Governor Edwin D. Morgan called an emergency meeting of his staff and leaders of the Senate and Assembly that afternoon in the Executive Chamber in Albany. A bill was drafted calling for New York to appropriate $3 million to provision and provide 30,000 New York Militia to support the preservation of the Union. Continue reading