Tag Archives: Albany

County and Borough Historians’ Institute Planned


By on

0 Comments

A County and Borough Historians’ Institute will be held August 25th, 2017 from 9 am to 5 pm at the New York State Museum Huxley Theater, located at 222 Madison Avenue, Albany.

The County and Borough Historians’ Institute is a free learning opportunity for County and Borough Historians hosted by the Office of Cultural Education and facilitated by the New York State Historian, the Association of Public Historians of New York State and the Government Appointed Historians of Western New York. Continue reading

Pets of Historic Cherry Hill Event August 19th


By on

0 Comments

On Saturday, August 19th, Historic Cherry Hill will present the 2nd annual The Pets of Cherry Hill event, from 1 to 4 pm.

Participants are invited to imagine Cherry Hill over a century ago, at the time of the “Bunnie Society,” at this free, all-ages event. The event is based on the “Bunnie Papers,” a collection of children’s artwork, stories, and business-related materials which chronicle the fifth generation’s fascinating garden and agricultural club activities, from the late 1890’s through 1903. Lovingly gathered and named by their mother, Van Rensselaer descendant and Cherry Hill matriarch Catherine Rankin, the collection includes genealogies of dozens of rabbits, chickens, and other pets who made up the imaginary world successively dubbed a “kingdom,” then “republic,” and finally a “society.” Continue reading

Fulton County Historian Named New Director of Ten Broeck Mansion


By on

0 Comments

Samantha Hall-SaladinoThe Board of Trustees at Albany County Historical Association (ACHA) has announced the appointment of Samantha Hall-Saladino as Executive Director.  Hall-Saladino assumed the role effective July 15th, 2017.

Hall-Saladino will oversee the operations of the Ten Broeck Mansion, an historic home built between 1797 and 1798 by General Abraham Ten Broeck and his wife, Elizabeth Van Rensselaer. The mansion is located in the Arbor Hill section of Albany and is the headquarters of the ACHA, a non-profit educational corporation dedicated to preserving, presenting, and promoting the history and culture of Albany County. Continue reading

Philip Schuyler: A Time to Remember


By on

0 Comments

Philip Schuyler 1881A recent post on here on The New York History Blog previewed Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton events at the Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site this month.

A recent article by Paul Grondahl, Director of the New York State Writer’s Institute, in the Albany Times Union noted that Schuyler Mansion is experiencing a spike in attendance due to the “Hamilton effect” – “a mysterious affliction created by Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical that altered the lives of countless unsuspecting fans with a powerful history lesson embedded in hypnotic, rhyming lyrics and a hip-hop beat.”

It is notable that Hamilton, Schuyler’s son-in-law, who spent only a few years at Schuyler Mansion, is boosting popular attendance there. Continue reading

UGRR Archaeology Open House At The Myers House


By on

0 Comments

myers houseOn Thursday, July 27 from 8 am to 2 pm, the Myers House in Albany will host an Archaeology Open House.

A six-week archaeological field school is now exploring the backyards of the Myers house, Thomas Elkins residence, and Ten Broeck Mansion in search of clues about the lives of African Americans who helped establish the Arbor Hill community during the early 19th century and the role of prominent community leaders in the struggle for justice and freedom.

Stephen and Harriet Myers were instrumental in the success of the Underground Railroad during the mid-nineteenth century. Today, their former residence is preserved as a significant historic site in Albany and a cornerstone of African American heritage in the Arbor Hill neighborhood. Continue reading

Alexander and Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton Events Planned In Albany


By on

1 Comment

A painting of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton From Friday, July 14, 2017 to Sunday, July 16, 2017, Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site in conjunction with the Alexander Hamilton Awareness Society will host a series of events and lectures about Alexander Hamilton and his wife, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, on the mansion grounds.

The festivities begin Friday evening at 5:30 pm with an open reception on mansion grounds and conclude with a walking tour of Albany on Sunday morning. Admission for each day’s activities is $5 per person. Registration for lectures and the walking tour are required as space is limited. Continue reading

Independence Day Celebration at Schuyler Mansion


By on

0 Comments

Schuyler Mansion On Tuesday, July 4th , 2017, Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site has invited the public to attend an old-fashioned Independence Day celebration on the mansion grounds, from 11 am to 4 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

A variety of 18th century activities may be sampled throughout the afternoon. Candle demonstrations and backgammon lessons will be available, and “Dr. Stringer,” Philip Schuyler’s physician, will discuss the fascinating subject of 18th century medicine, including the use of leeches, bleeding, and oxygen. Continue reading

Peter Hess: Civil War Reaches Albany


By on

0 Comments

 Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Albany's Washington ParkFollowing his election as President in 1860, Abraham Lincoln undertook a train ride to Washington that would take him through Albany. He arrived here on February 18, 1861 with his wife and three sons. As their train passed the West Albany railroad shops, an electrical switch was turned off at the nearby Dudley Observatory, causing an electromagnet mounted on the roof of the Capitol in downtown Albany to release a metal ball that slid down a pole, signaling to military officials to start a 21-gun salute in Capitol Park. Continue reading

Albany History: John Pye and the Highwayman


By on

2 Comments

John Pye Possible Gravesite in Albany Rural CemeteryOn a cold and snowy 21st of December in 1808, about two in the afternoon, there alighted at the door of the old tavern in Green Street, Albany, then kept by Whitmore, a dark complexioned but elegant stranger, evidently of southern origin. He stepped to the hall of that ancient house of entertainment, and while shaking from a richly furred mantle, the snow which had profusely fallen that day; he desired the ostler to dismantle his remarkably elegant horse of its riding caparisons and to convey the horse to the warmest stall the stables afforded; when himself hastened to the ample bar-room of that well ordered establishment.

Once inside, the stranger asked the keeper of the inn, whether it was agreeable to entertain him a few days. On further acquaintance, the genteel stranger proved a gentleman of the first order, prepossessing in his manners, agreeable and diffuse in conversation, as he was extremely well informed in the lore of literature, as well of any and all parts of the globe, the governments of the different nations, the workings of universal politics and the balance of power between the different nations of Christendom. Continue reading