Tag Archives: Academia

How Historians Publish History


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ben_franklins_worldHow do historians publish the history books and articles we love to read?

This episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast takes us behind-the-scenes of how historians publish their writing about history.

Our guide through the world of history publications is Joshua Piker, a Professor of History at the College of William and Mary, and the Editor of the William & Mary Quarterly, the leading journal of early American history and culture. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/105

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How Historians Write About History


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ben_franklins_worldHow do historians write about the people, places, and events they’ve studied in historical sources?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we continue the “Doing History: How Historians Work” series by investigating how historians write about history. Our guide for this investigation is John Demos, the Samuel Knight Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and an award-winning historian. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/101

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Ron Chernow Wins Empire State Archives and History Award


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Ron ChernowPulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Chernow will receive the 2016 Empire State Archives and History Award from the New York State Archives Partnership Trust at a public program on Wednesday, November 2 at 7 pm.

Chernow is the author of Alexander Hamilton, the 2004 biography adapted by Lin-Manuel Miranda for the hit Broadway musical Hamilton.

The public is invited to hear Chernow speak about his career as an author, biographer and historian with prominent Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer. Continue reading

How to Organize Your History Research


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ben_franklins_worldWhat do historians do with all of the information they collect when they research?

How do they access their research in a way that allows them to find the information they need to write the books and articles we enjoy reading?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast,  Billy Smith, a Professor of History at Montana State University, leads us on an exploration of how historians organize and access their research. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/097

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How to Research History Online


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ben_franklins_worldHow do historians conduct research online? Listeners ask this question a lot. As the “Doing History” series explores how historians work, it offers the perfect opportunity to explore answers to it.

Sharon Block, a Professor of History at the University of California-Irvine, has made use of computers and digital resources to do history for years, which is why, in this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, she serves as our guide for how to research history online.. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/092

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Historiography: The History of History Writing


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ben_franklins_worldHistorians rely on secondary historical sources almost as much as they rely on primary historical sources.

But what are secondary historical sources and how do they help historians know what they know about the past?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Michael McDonnell, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Sydney, guides us through how he used secondary historical sources to investigate the pivotal role Native Americans played in the history of the Great Lakes region and early North America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/088

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Fort Ticonderoga Welcomes Graduate Fellows


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2016 Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellows (L-R) Riley Clark-Long, Connor Wilson, James Wils, and Elizabeth Scully. Photo credit Fort TiconderogaFour graduate students arrived at Fort Ticonderoga in mid-June to begin two-month internships as part of the Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellowship program. The fellowships run through August 12th and include internships in Education, Exhibitions, Horticulture, and Interpretation.

Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO Beth Hill said, “The Fellows will focus their research and creative energy to support exhibitions and programs related to the year 1757 at Fort Ticonderoga. 1757 will be the interpretive focus for 2017.” Continue reading

Material Culture: Reading Historical Sources


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ben_franklins_worldWhat do historians do with historical sources when they find them?

How do they read them for information about the past?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Zara Anishanslin, an Assistant Professor of History at CUNY’s College of Staten Island, leads us on an exploration of how historians read historical sources by taking us through the documents and objects left behind by four everyday people. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/084

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Johanna Yaun: A Public History State Of Emergency


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New York State MapThis week I came across an article about Joe Bagley, the 31-year- old archaeologist who has been put in charge of one million mostly un-cataloged City of Boston artifacts. Underpaid and overburdened, he’s found ways to triage the projects that come at him each day. He has to be a historian, a fundraiser, a bureaucrat, a volunteer coordinator, a social media guru, an artifact guardian, a cheerleader for preservation, a meticulous registrar, and a broad minded strategic planner, all at the same time.

You’re not alone, Joe. This has become the narrative of the post-recession workplace. It’s like a reality TV premise: we give you poverty level pay and a mountain of responsibility, and expect you to turn this organization around with your hipster ingenuity. I see it so often that I’ve started to refer to it as the martyr-hero motif. Continue reading

Theodore Roosevelt On Popular And Scholarly History


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theodore roosevelt pugilist and presidentNew York has had several history-minded governors, including Andrew Cuomo, who often cites the Erie Canal and other historical achievements as evidence of our state’s historical greatness and resilience. Levi P. Morton signed the law that created the office of the State Historian. Alfred E. Smith signed the statute that created the network of official local government historians. Franklin D. Roosevelt served for a while as the official historian of the Town of Hyde Park.

But Theodore Roosevelt, governor from 1899 to 1901 and president, 1901-1909, was a notable historian in his own right. He read extensively in history and his home at Sagamore Hill on Long Island reportedly contained about 12,000 books, many of them on history, at the time of his death in 1919.Roosevelt’s own books “The Naval War of 1812” and “The Winning of the West” were best-sellers in their day. His History of New York City is still interesting. Continue reading