Superstorm Sandy: Learning from Our Neighbors Roundtable


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Photograph of  Prattsville by Sue Clark.On Sunday, November 12 at 2 pm, the Long Island Museum, in collaboration with Long Island Traditions, will host a roundtable discussion: Learning from our Neighbors, looking back on the five years since Super Storm Sandy and how communities come together following other historic storms.

Nancy Solomon, Director of Long Island Traditions will facilitate a panel discussion with storm survivors from upstate New York, North Carolina, Long Island and Staten Island on coping and rebuilding after Mother Nature’s wrath. Following the discussion, visitors may visit In Harm’s Way, on display in the Art Museum through December 31, 2017. Continue reading

Sacandaga Canal Project: A Short History


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documents of the senate 63rd sessionWith the opening of the entire Erie Canal in 1825, a call for more canals and other internal improvements arose from all over New York State. People in many legislative districts thought that if the state could build a canal that had already shown its great value, it could also provide infrastructure projects to help regional economies to connect with the artificial river that joined the interior Great Lakes and the global market through Albany and New York City. This was also the case coming from the legislative representatives from Montgomery County and although many lateral canals would be subsequently surveyed, planned and some would even be built, perhaps the most intriguing was one that never had a shovel turned.

As early as 1826, citizens from Montgomery County were calling for a plan to connect the Erie Canal – which already ran through the county on the south side of the Mohawk River – to the industrializing area around the county seat of Johnstown and further into the wilderness to the north for raw materials. Inhabitants of Montgomery and Hamilton Counties formally called upon the New York State Senate through the Canal Commission for a survey to be conducted and a planned canal from Caughnawaga (present day Fonda) up the Sacandaga River Valley (Journal of the NYS Senate 49 Sess 1826). The original intention was to have a canal of over 30 miles and elevation increase of 350 feet that would connect the Erie Canal to the waters of what is now known as the lower Adirondacks. That could therefore be connected to the head waters of the Hudson River and also through a series of lakes to the Raquette River and the St. Lawrence River. Senators knew that in order to populate that region of the state and exploit its natural resources, some forms of improvements would be necessary. However, their concerns grew over the expense and circuitous route the canal would need to travel. The senate forwarded the recommendation to the committee on canals were it apparently lay dormant. Continue reading

Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium


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theatres of the american revolutionThe American Revolution Round Table: Hudson-Mohawk Valleys is hosting a free event on Saturday, November 11, 2017 from 8 am to 4:15 pm. The Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium is based on the book of the same name, Theaters of the American Revolution.

Five experts on the American Revolution will discuss the Northern Theater, the Western Theater, the War at Sea, the Southern Theater, and the Middle Theater. Continue reading

Citizen Soldier: Rev War Journal of Joseph Bloomfield


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citizen soldier bookOn Friday, November 10, 2017, the Fort Plain Museum is holding a book release signing and reception for Citizen Soldier: The Revolutionary War Journal of Joseph Bloomfield, edited by Mark Edward Lender and James Kirby Martin.

Bloomfield was an officer in the 3rd New Jersey Regiment from 1776 to 1779. His service took him from the Mohawk Valley (Guy Park Manor, Johnson Hall, Fort Dayton, Fort Stanwix and others) to Fort Ticonderoga in New York, to the battle of Brandywine in Pennsylvania, and to the battle of Monmouth in his native state. Also included are Bloomfield’s notes on the culture and behavior of the Iroquois tribes known collectively as the Six Nations, which played a crucial role in revolutionary New York. Continue reading

Civil War Word and Music at the Arkell Museum


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Wanda Burch and John KenosianArtists Wanda Burch and John Kenosian will perform concert at The Arkell Museum, Friday evening, November 10, at 7 pm.

Home Voices: the American Civil War Experience through Words and Music will feature guest artist, soprano Gisella Montanez-Case Wanda Burch, historian and writer, Glen, NY, and singer/songwriter John Kenosian, Clifton Park.

Providing perspective on the human side of the Civil War, this program explores the dreams and imaginings of those who fought the war as recorded in their letters, journals and memoirs.

Sometimes published as poems or songs or printed in newspapers, these rarely acknowledged writings reflect the personalities and experiences of their authors. Some expressions of fear, pain, loss, homesickness and disappointment are related with grim fatalism, some with glimpses of humor. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Schoharie Crossing’s NYS History Month Series Set


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nys history month logoSchoharie Crossing State Historic Site will conduct its third annual Tuesday Talk series to recognize New York State History Month this November. Each week a speaker will present on regional or New York State history.

This year, the series starts on Tuesday the 7th with Liaisons Plaisantes performing music from the early 19th century. Music during the early part of the 19th century was not only entertainment but also connected people and communities. All along the turnpikes and canals of New York, music reflected the culture, political, social movements and a changing world view in light of new innovations. Continue reading