How to Research History Online


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ben_franklins_worldHow do historians conduct research online? Listeners ask this question a lot. As the “Doing History” series explores how historians work, it offers the perfect opportunity to explore answers to it.

Sharon Block, a Professor of History at the University of California-Irvine, has made use of computers and digital resources to do history for years, which is why, in this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, she serves as our guide for how to research history online.. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/092

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Adirondack Museum Planning $9.4M Overhaul


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adirondack museum updatesThe board of trustees of the Adirondack Museum has announced the launch of the public phase of its $9.4 million capital campaign “For Generations,” which is hoped to raise funds to update its exhibitions, expand opportunities for visitors to explore the museum’s natural surroundings, enhance universal access, and other improvements.

More than $7.5 million has been raised in donations and pledges to date. Continue reading

Two Jefferson County Men Who Made Good in Illinois


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P1RockfordMfgCo1889A pair of North Country men, born just a few miles apart in Jefferson County, left New York in their adult years and settled about 65 miles apart in Illinois, where each left his lasting mark. Together, their names were also attached to an institution in Arkansas that lives on nearly a century and a half later.

John Budlong was born in February 1833 in Rodman, New York, about eight miles south of Watertown. The Budlong family has many historical connections dating back to the Revolutionary War. John attended several of the best schools in the region: the Rodman Seminary, the Jefferson County Institute at Watertown, the Adams Institute, and Falley Seminary at Fulton in Oswego County. At the age of 18 he began a wide-ranging teaching career, working in North Carolina, Texas, and Missouri before returning to Rodman, where he continued teaching and began studying law. Continue reading

Irish Military Encampment And Concert August 13


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hair of the dog bandMilitary living historians and authors will cover the grounds of the Hancock House in Ticonderoga on Saturday, August 13 for a day-long event celebrating Irish history. The evening will feature a concert by “Hair of the Dog,” the well-known Celtic band with a large fan base across the United States and Europe. Opening for the band is the popular local trio “Loose Monkeys.”

The afternoon will also include several brief programs highlighting the Irish in the American Civil War and How the Adirondacks worked for Irish Freedom. William L. McKone, author of Vermont’s Irish Rebel – Captain John Lonergan and President of the Fenian Historical Society, will present a program on the Fenians. Continue reading

Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes in Early America


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ben_franklins_worldDid you know that George Washington’s favorite drink was whiskey?

Actually, it wasn’t.

Washington preferred Madeira, a fortified Portuguese wine from the island of Madeira.

Why the false start to our weekly exploration of history?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Gregory Dowd, a Professor of History and American Culture at the University of Michigan, leads us on an exploration of rumors, legends, and hoaxes that circulated throughout early America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/091

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Champlain Valley Passport Stamp Program Initiated


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champlain stamp 2016This summer, a treasure hunt of sorts awaits visitors to some of the region’s museums, natural areas and cultural attractions. The Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership (CVNHP) created a passport stamp program that directs people to places that exemplify the area’s rich, varied and unique natural and cultural heritage. People that visit all 11 participating locations will get a limited-edition “Find Your Park” challenge coin. Continue reading

Equal Pay for Women in 1870: The Charley Warner Solution


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1928 HdlineCWarner01Unequal pay for women ably performing the same jobs as men is unfair and idiotic. Why the sex of an employee reduces their pay should be a mystery to all, especially when most men can relate stories of male co-workers receiving equal pay despite being underperformers, shirkers, or just plain lazy. But the issue is nothing new. Faced with a need for self-supporting income in the 1870s, a northern New York woman didn’t wait for society to grant her equality. She instead chose her own path: going undercover in a man’s world. In doing so, she may have also found more happiness than anyone realized at the time. Continue reading

History Tour Across Lake Champlain Bridge Sunday


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crown point 1930On July 31, 2016, at 1 pm, a guided history walk across the Lake Champlain Bridge will be held. Attendees will meet at the Crown Point State Historic Site museum nestled between two colonial forts on the New York side of the bridge for the start of the tour. Allow at least two hours for this walk back and forth across the bridge.

Participants can learn about nearly 9,000 years of human history at this important and beautiful location on Lake Champlain. The channel with its peninsulas, or points, on each side made it one of the most strategic spots on Lake Champlain for the Native Americans for millennia, and for the French, British, and early Americans in the 17th and 18th centuries. Continue reading