Uncovered Story: Indian Enslavement in America


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldIn 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He also played a central role in the European adoption of Indian or Native American slavery.

When we think of slavery in early America, we often think of the practice of African and African-American chattel slavery. However, that system of slavery wasn’t the only system of slavery that existed in North America. Systems of Indian slavery existed too. In fact, Indians remained enslaved long after the 13th Amendment abolished African-American slavery in 1865.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Andrés Reséndez, a professor of history at the University of California, Davis and author of The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in Americas (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016), leads us on an investigation of this “other” form of American slavery. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/139.

Continue reading

Convention Days Announces Centennial Gala


By on

0 Comments

dr mary walkerConvention Days will commemorate the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in New York State with a Thanksgiving Dinner Gala entitled “A Fine Agitation” followed by the World Premiere of a One-Woman Play about Dr. Mary Walker, the only woman to receive the Medal of Honor.

The title “A Fine Agitation” comes from a letter from Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton after Anthony voted in 1872: “Well I have been & gone and done it!!! . . . We are in for a fine agitation . . .”

The dinner, being served at at the New York Chiropractic College, will be based on a 1916 Thanksgiving menu from The Hoag House, precursor to The Gould Hotel. Continue reading

Sullivan County’s First World War Sacrifices


By on

0 Comments

Leonard Houghtaling from Neversink (on right) served overseas and fought in WWIJuly, 2017 is 100th anniversary of the first U.S. forces sent overseas to fight in World War I. The Time and the Valleys Museum in Grahamsville, NY will be honoring the men who fought in the war and the women who supported the troops by hosting a new exhibit and weekend of special programming on July 8th and 9th.

The new exhibit, A Rendezvous with Death: Local Sacrifice in the First World War highlights Sullivan County residents who participated in WWI. It includes photos, artifacts and little known facts and information about the war. The new exhibit can be viewed through Labor Day during Museum hours: Thursday through Sunday, noon to 4 pm and weekends in September. Continue reading

Independence Day Celebration at Hanford Mills Museum


By on

2 Comments

ice blocks used for chilling ice creamIn February, more than seven tons of ice were cut from the Mill pond at the Hanford Mills Museum Ice Harvest Festival, and then stored in the Ice House. On July 4th, that ice will be used to make ice cream on a steam-powered churn, and visitors to the Museum’s Independence Day Celebration can sample the results.

The ice is used to chill the outside of the churn, while the locally produced milk and cream is inside the churn.

The Independence Day Celebration, which runs 10 am to 4 pm on July 4, also features a fishing derby for kids, frog jumping contests, music, delicious food, and field games. Visitors also can tour the historic Mill and woodworking shop and see water- and steam-power demonstrations featuring the 1926 Fitz Overshot waterwheel, the steam boiler and steam engines. Children 12 and under, Museum members, and active duty military and their families, receive free admission. Continue reading

Orange County’s John Hathorn And His Militia


By on

0 Comments

hawthorne portraitThe Neversink Valley Museum of History & Innovation will present a History Talk on Wednesday, July 19th at 7 pm with local historian Sue Gardner. Gardner will speak about “Most Obedient Servant: Tracking the Life and Legacy of John Hathorn and his Militia.”

John Hathorn of Warwick, “the man who lost the Battle of Minisink” was a successful military leader, politician, and activist, who served in the first and fourth Congresses of the United States. Yet his life has remained in the shadows due to the destruction of his collected papers by his family shortly after his death.

A search spanning more than 15 years has turned up a great deal about Hathorn, his close involvement with the early days of the nation and New York State, and the activities of his men during the Revolutionary War. This illustrated presentation by Sue Gardner will trace evidence of this forgotten founding father and the men who were under his command. Continue reading

New Book On Role of Men in Suffrage Movement


By on

0 Comments

The SuffragentsBrooke Kroeger’s book, The Suffragents (SUNY Press, 2017) tells the story of how some of New York’s most powerful men formed the Men’s League for Woman Suffrage, which grew between 1909 and 1917 from 150 founding members into a force of thousands across thirty-five states.

Kroeger details the National American Woman Suffrage Association’s strategic decision to accept their organized help and then to deploy these influential new allies as suffrage foot soldiers, a role they accepted.

Continue reading

New Critical Edition of ‘The History of the Five Indian Nations’


By on

0 Comments

Five Indian NationsCornell University Press has released a new Critical Edition of Cadwallader Colden’s History of the Five Indian Nations Depending on the Province of New-York in America (2017). The Critical Edition includes several essays that consider Colden’s original text across social, cultural, and political contexts.

The History of the Five Indian Nations Depending on the Province of New-York in America was originally published in 1727 and revised in 1747. In the book, Colden discusses the religion, manners, customs, laws, and forms of government of the confederacy of tribes composed of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas (and, later, Tuscaroras), and gives accounts of battles, treaties, and trade up to 1697. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


By on

0 Comments

Continue reading