Hermione Arrives in U.S., Lafayette Exhibit Planned


By on

1 Comment

Hermoine arrives in Yorktown Virginia“She sails like a bird,” the Marquis de Lafayette wrote of the Hermione – the ship that carried him and a cache of materiel across the Atlantic in 1780 and which is the model for a modern replica which arrived in the United States on Friday.

The New-York Historical Society in Manhattan is celebrating Lafayette, the “Boy General” whose friendship with George Washington and diplomatic networks in Paris helped win the American Revolution with a new exhibit timed to the arrival of the Hermione. Continue reading

Grant Cottage Property Being Transferred To State Parks


By on

2 Comments

Grant CottageThe New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) has announced that Grant Cottage State Historic Site, formerly part of the now closed Mount McGregor State Correctional Facility, will be part of a 750-acre parcel being transferred to Moreau Lake State Park.

Grant Cottage State Historic Site is the site where President Ulysses S. Grant died in July 1885.  Continue reading

Uncovering the True Birthplace Francis Pratt


By on

1 Comment

01NYHFrancisPrattAfter he and Amos Whitney formed Pratt & Whitney in 1869, Francis Pratt served as president until 1898, while Whitney was the general superintendent.

Their personal and joint histories prior to forming the company are well documented in many sources. Comparison with other records suggests only one discrepancy, but to historians it’s a whopper. The issue: where was Francis Pratt born and who can claim him as their own? Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


By on

0 Comments

Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 9,200 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

A Call For Municipal Historian Reform In NYS


By on

17 Comments

NYS MapThis question of what municipal historians should be doing came up at the recent annual conference of the Association of Public Historians of New York (APNYS). The setting was a session at the conference for first-time municipal historians and was chaired by Christine Ridarsky, the City of Rochester Historian who works at the Central Library in Rochester and serves on the APHNYS board.

The stories told during the session did not reflect well on the state of the municipal historian position in New York State. Some had stumbled into the job based on very local circumstances. They didn’t know what the job entailed, nor did the municipal leaders who appointed them. Continue reading

Lilac Arts Series Launched At NYC’s Pier 25


By on

1 Comment

Lilac Arts ExhibitThe Lilac Arts Series, a contemporary art exhibition aboard the historic ship Lilac, will run through August 15, 2015 and focus on three themes inspired by the ship’s story – “Steam”, “Work + Labor” and “Restoration/Reinvention“.  The visual art exhibition will feature the work of over 25 artists within the ship’s unique spaces, including several site-specific installations.  The exhibition and events are free and open to the public.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Lilac was built in 1933 and is America’s only surviving steam-powered lighthouse tender. Lilac is currently being restored as a unique vehicle for maritime education and community activities and is berthed at Hudson River Park’s Pier 25. Continue reading

Bruce Dearstyne Talk At Albany Institute Sunday


By on

1 Comment

Bruce Dearstyne Spirit of New YorkThe Albany Institute of History & Art will host historian (and regular New York History Blog contributor) Dr. Bruce W. Dearstyne for a lecture and book signing on Sunday, June 7 at 2 pm for his recently published book The Spirit of New York: Defining Events in the Empire State’s History.

The lecture is open to the public and is free with museum admission. Books will be available for purchase and signing. Continue reading

Free Family Event At Historic Cherry Hill


By on

0 Comments

Cherry HillOn Saturday, June 6th, Historic Cherry Hill will present the Hudson River Family Day, from 1 until 4 pm. Participants are invited to step into the 1700s and experience Hudson River sloop trade and daily life at this free event. The Hudson River Trading Game, with its 34-foot game board, will immerse all ages in the adventure of 18th century trade and travel. The game is based on the actual experiences of merchant and sloop owner, Philip Van Rensselaer of Cherry Hill. Continue reading

Does Your Community Have A Literary Landmark?


By on

2 Comments

Empire State Center for the Book Literary LandmarksHotels, bars, a lighthouse and a windmill are just some of the sites in New York State that have been declared Literary Landmarks by United for Libraries (formerly known as Friends of Libraries USA). The literary landmark program began in 1986 to encourage the dedication of historic literary sites.

The first literary landmark to be designated in New York was The Algonquin Hotel in 1996, home of the legendary Algonquin Roundtable  There are currently 15 landmarks in New York State with two more planned in the near future.  The Wilder Homestead in Malone, NY was made famous by Laura Ingalls Wilder in her book Farmer Boy will be dedicated this summer and The Robert Louis Stevenson Cottage in Saranac Lake , NY will receive its designation this fall. Continue reading

French Impressionists Exhibit Opens In Utica


By on

0 Comments

29471 IBrilliant, colorful paintings by the artists who revolutionized the art world will be showcased in Monet to Matisse: The Age of French Impressionism, on view through November 29 Utica’s Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute’s Museum of Art.

Monet to Matisse features more than 60 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and pastel drawings from the renowned collection of the Dixon Gallery and Gardens in Memphis, Tennessee. Continue reading

The Northern New York Roots of Pratt & Whitney


By on

1 Comment

01NYHFrancisPrattIn the year 2000, five years after Plattsburgh Air Force Base closed, Pratt & Whitney signed a lease, moved in, and set up shop on the former base property. Many jobs and residents had been lost in the air-base shutdown, making Pratt & Whitney a valued anchor business in the recovery effort.

Their arrival might have been a homecoming of sorts with historical significance, but persistent misinformation carried forward for more than a century appears to have robbed the region of an important link to the past. Continue reading