The Mystery of Dutchess County’s Chief Crow


By on

0 Comments

chief crow burial groundA familiar blue 1935 New York State Education Department roadside marker proclaims, “Indian Burial Ground. Chief Crow and other Mohican Shacomecos of Moravian Faith buried here. Last burial about 1850.”

At first glance, the marker is not at all out of place. The sign is located in the hamlet of Jackson Corners on the Roeliff Jansen Kill, a 56-mile tributary of the Hudson River that is considered to have been populated by the Mohican. The hamlet is technically in Dutchess County’s town of Milan, but borders on Pine Plains, the location of Shacomeco village, and Columbia County’s Gallatin. Continue reading

Citizen Sailors: Becoming American in the Age of Revolution


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldWhat did it mean to be a citizen during the late-18th and early-19th centuries?

Why and how did early American sailors seem intent on proving their citizenship to the United States?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore citizenship and maritime life during the Age of Revolutions with Nathan Perl-Rosenthal, author of Citizen Sailors: Becoming American in the Age of Revolution (Belknap Press, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/076

Continue reading

Battlefield Stewardship Workshops Planned


By on

0 Comments

crown point by john warrenHistorians, museums, cultural groups and community members are invited to join one of two workshops on battlefield stewardship to be held at two locations – Wednesday April 13, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm in the Schuyler Room of Saratoga Town Hall, and Thursday April 14th from 1 to 4 PM in the auditorium of Crown Point State Historic Site.

The workshop discussion will be led by Saratoga National Historical Park Superintendent Amy Bracewell. Keynote speakers Lindsey Morrison and Kathy Robertson from the Civil War Trust will share information about Campaign 1776 – a national initiative to foster the preservation and interpretation of Revolutionary War and War of 1812 battlefields. Continue reading

Utica College Local History Symposium Wednesday


By on

0 Comments

symposium posterIn the 2002 film “Spider-Man”, Uncle Ben tells his nephew Peter Parker that “with great power comes great responsibility.”

This year’s Utica College History seniors have taken Uncle Ben’s words to heart. They’ve used the power of research to fulfill the historian’s responsibility to reconstruct the past.

Moreover, each of the presentations plays with the theme “Superheroes” to discover some of the struggles and accomplishments in Mohawk Valley history. Continue reading

New Netherland Podcast Features Archaeologist Paul Huey


By on

0 Comments

new netherlands praatjesIn this episode of the New Netherland Praatjes podcast, archaeologist Paul Huey, who has more than four decades of experience excavating sites across New York State, chats with Russell Shorto about Huey’s long and rewarding career.

Huey explains the process behind archaeological excavations and the evolution of the excavation process over the years. Some of the archaeological digs he details are Schuyler Flatts, the Van Curler house, and Fort Orange. Continue reading

Brooklyn Heights: An Industrial History


By on

0 Comments

brooklyn heights book coverRobert Furman’s book Brooklyn Heights: the Rise, Fall and Rebirth of America’s First Suburb (The History Press, 2015) is a substantial illustrated history of Brooklyn. The book takes a look at the moving forces of history, and shows that technology is the great creator and destroyer, especially in the rise and fall of cities.

Brooklyn was once a great industrial city, like many others. It was enabled by transportation technology: steam ferries, railroads, canals. It was once the largest freight port in the world, in particular in Red Hook’s Atlantic and Erie Basins. They were the discharging end of the Erie Canal, and later expanded into international shipping. Continue reading

Review: The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel


By on

0 Comments

the remarkable rise of Eliza JumelShe’s the woman who dueled with Aaron Burr and won. Move over Alexander Hamilton. The life of Eliza Jumel is a tale about a woman who pulled hard on her Yankee bootstraps to make good on the American dream.

Margaret Oppenheimer’s splendid book, The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: Marriage and Money in the Early Republic (Chicago Review Press, 2015), takes readers along on a tale of intrigue, scandal and innuendo. Far from a steamy beach read featuring men in white wigs, this meticulously-researched tale paints a detailed and scholarly portrait of New York City and the way in which the city’s growth provided fertile ground for the ambitions of its heroine. Continue reading