This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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Historians Podcast: Mario Cuomo, Fonda History


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The Historians LogoThis week on “The Historians” podcast, Barry Wygel of Time Warner Cable TV News and I talk about the legacy of Mario Cuomo, an interview recorded January 1, the night that former Governor Cuomo died. Then it’s on to the Fonda Reformed Church where I gave a history talk January 5 to the Glen-Mohawk Senior Citizens. Stories are told about Elizabeth Luciano, known as Queen Libby of Fonda; a Perth, N.Y. valedictorian whose name may be inscribed on a plaque on the Moon and Washington Frothingham, a preacher and syndicated newspaper columnist who lived in Fonda. Listen at “The Historians” online archive at http://www.bobcudmore.com/thehistorians/
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This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

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What the Huguenots Carried


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Book Cover - The HuguenotsTim O’Brien’s short story collection, The Things They Carried (1990), is in part about the culture and life experience American soldiers brought with them to Vietnam, and how this past helped shape identity and action in a foreign environment. And though many have heard of the Huguenots, being French and protestant as a prerequisite, few know their story until they became one of the largest groups of emigrants in European history.

The Huguenot diaspora would spread to lands considered old and new, and would go on to found communities across the Atlantic like New Paltz and New Rochelle most prominently in the colony of New York. This unique people and their pre-refugee history are treated with clarity and depth in The Huguenots (Yale University Press, 2013) by Geoffrey Treasure. Treasure, who has written book length biographies on Louis XIV and Cardinal Mazarin, brings his expertise on the history of France to bear on this often overlooked and underrepresented early modern French community. Continue reading

Talk, Exhibit Features General Newton Curtis


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NMC postcard statueAn Ogdensburg statue stands in honor of General Newton Martin Curtis, a DePeyster native, who distinguished himself during the Civil War and won a Congressional Medal of Honor 150 years ago this week.

On January 15, 1865, General Curtis successfully led the Union forces at the Battle of Fort Fisher, North Carolina.  Find out more about the life and accomplishments of this true American hero at a special lecture and exhibit this Saturday, January 17th, from 11 am to 4 pm at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association’s Silas Wright House in Canton, NY.  Continue reading

New Exhibits, Film Planned at Historic Saranac Lake


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PastedGraphic-1Amy Catania, Executive Director of Historic Saranac Lake has announced that the Saranac Laboratory Museum has received a major grant from the Will Rogers Motion Pictures Pioneers Foundation to support exhibit renovations.

The $20,000 grant, with the possibility of a small additional grant to be announced later, will support the design and installation of two new exhibits to open in 2015. The grant also supports the production of a short film on Will Rogers Memorial Hospital. Continue reading

NY History And Economic Development Councils


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REDC RegionsThis posts is the second in a series of posts examining the awards approved by the Regional Economic Development Councils (REDC) from the perspective of the Path through History.

In the first post we saw that in 2013 and 2014 there were only two grants directly connected to the Path through History and both were media-based awards. There also was a glimpse of hope in an award that could potentially generate a Route 28 Path through History. This awards hints at the unrealized potential of the Path through History project. Continue reading

Make History Accessible With QR Codes


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Harwood QRAs the recently appointed historian for the City of Ogdensburg I was stunned at the amount of historical artifacts and research that I had inherited that somehow was crammed into a very small space.  I had always been interested in local history and in a previous life had worked as an archivist at the Ogdensburg Public Library, until teaching called me.

Twenty years later I was given the task of not only preserving Ogdensburg’s history, but making it accessible to others. Continue reading

The Woodlands Historic Site of Philadelphia


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ben_franklins_worldWilliam Hamilton built The Woodlands mansion in Philadelphia in the 1760s. The estate stands as a tribute to the significant architectural and botanical contributions Hamilton made to Philadelphia and the young United States, including a part in the Lewis and Clark expedition.

This week on the “Ben Franklin’s World” podcast we speak with Jessica Baumert, the Executive Director of The Woodlands Historic Site in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/011 Continue reading

Traveling NY Shipwrecks Exhibit In Oswego


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3682FairLakeGeorgePanel3005The Great Shipwrecks of NY’s Great Lakes is in Oswego, NY, at the Tyler Art Gallery in Penfield Hall Library at SUNY Oswego. The exhibit was developed for the 2014 Great New York State Fair and was updated for this installation. It will be on display through January 22, 2015.

The exhibit includes interpretive panels highlighting shipwrecks in Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Lake Champlain, the Finger Lakes, Lake George and the St. Lawrence River; videos; and a newly-built replica of the ‘turtle ship’ Radeau that sunk in Lake George. Freshwater science technology components including a remotely-operated underwater vehicle and a Great Lakes Research Consortium in-water sensing buoy. Continue reading

An Update On The Finger Lakes Museum


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Finger Lakes MuseumIn December, The Finger Lakes Museum was awarded two New York State agency grants through Round IV of the Regional Economic Development Council Initiative. The awards totaled $254,500.

In two separate letters to museum board President John Adamski, Empire State Development President and CEO Kenneth Adams wrote that the Finger Lakes Regional Council had recommended a $200,000 grant award for capital construction work at the museum’s campus in Branchport and an additional $54,500 through its Division of Tourism for marketing and promotion through the state’s I Love New York program. Continue reading

Designate Adirondack Park A National Heritage Area


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Entering-Adirondack-ParkI’ve been to the Rockies, and clearly, a visitor can’t help but be awestruck by their height and views. Yet the Adirondack Park is where I prefer to go.

I’ve had decades of pleasurable visits to the Adirondack Park to hike, climb, ski, canoe, enjoy the scenery and go to the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake. Whether my visit is to recreate or debate park management policy, I’m drawn to the region’s history and ongoing politics as well as its lakes, ponds and rivers. Continue reading

Saratoga Battlefield’s 20th Annual Frost Faire


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Saratoga Frost FaireSnow or no snow, the Saratoga Battlefield’s 20th annual Frost Faire will be held on Saturday, January 24th, 2015 from 11 am to 3 pm at the Battlefield (located on Routes 4 and 32 in Stillwater).

Inspired by Frost Faires in 1700s England, this event offers activities like: children’s crafts and games, ongoing contra-dancing, a 12 pm winter nature trek and scavenger hunt, light refreshments, historic handwriting demonstrations, snow tubing “The Big Hill,” horse and carriage rides, and musket and cannon firings. Continue reading

Erie Canalway Event Grants Available


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Erie Canalway MapTo give canal-related events a boost, the Erie Canalway Heritage Corridor has teamed up with the NYS Canal Corporation to offer a limited number of sponsorships of up to $500 for events or festivals taking place in the National Heritage Corridor from May through November 2015.

Qualifying events must promote or celebrate the distinctive historic, cultural, scenic, or recreational resources of the canal corridor.  Eligible applicants include municipalities or nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations. Continue reading

Cuomo Eulogy Echoes Lincoln, Seward


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Mario Cuomo in 2009 (courtesy New York State Writers Institute)Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s eloquent eulogy last week for his father, Mario M. Cuomo, echoed both Abraham Lincoln and former New York Gov. William Seward, one of the leading abolitionists in political life.

“Mario Cuomo was the keynote speaker for our better angels,” Andrew Cuomo said at the funeral on Wednesday, invoking the memory of his father’s famous San Francisco Democratic National Convention speech and, at the same time, recalling the historic closing lines of Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address. Continue reading

NY Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer


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BOOKThe New York Genealogical and Biographical Society’s new book, New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, was featured on the “Forget-Me-Not Hour” podcast on January 7th. NYG&B President McKelden Smith explained what this monumental work is all about – the first of its kind ever for New York. Founded in 1869, the NYG&B it is the largest genealogical society in New York and the only one that is state-wide.

Listen listen to the podcast online here.  Order the book online here.

 

Charles Shaw, Ace Adirondack Attorney (Conclusion)


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NYH2 CPShawBookletDespite all his accomplishments, Charles Shaw’s career is largely defined by a decade-long battle he fought on behalf of the cable car interests for rail control of New York City’s streets. Cable’s two main rivals: horse-powered rail and underground lines. Both had many powerful backers.

Initially, Charles was hired to perform one task: lobby the state legislature for specific modifications of a bill under consideration in Albany. After earning the modern equivalent of more than a quarter million dollars for his efforts, Shaw was retained by the cable men, who wanted San Francisco-type cars operating on 70 miles of New York City roads. Continue reading

Amsterdam Icon: The Mohawk Teepee


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2015-Small-Cover-Photo2The cover of Historic Amsterdam League’s 2015 calendar is a picture of the former Mohawk Teepee restaurant, built in an abandoned rock quarry adjacent to a waterfall in Amsterdam’s East End.

The Mohawk Teepee was the brainchild of Myron and Lidia Bazar, both natives of Ukraine. Myron was born in Ternopil and Lidia in Boryslav, according to Ukrainian Weekly. Continue reading

New Book: America’s Covered Bridges


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9780804842655__06269.1405458218.1280.1280The history of North America is in many ways encapsulated in the history of her covered bridges. The early 1800s saw a tremendous boom in the construction of these bridges, and in the years that followed as many as 15,000 covered bridges were built. Today, fewer than a thousand remain.

Without covered bridges to span the rivers and provide access to vast swaths of the interior that had previously been difficult to access – America never would have developed the way she did. In America’s Covered Bridges (Tuttle Publishing, 2014), authors Terry E. Miller and Ronald G. Knapp tell the fascinating story of these bridges, how they were built, and the technological breakthroughs required to construct them. Continue reading