A Source of New Ideas for Historic Preservation


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Historic preservation is a very important element of local history. There is a good deal of literature on the topic. But every now and then there is a new book which advances fresh ideas and puts the issue in a new light.

One such new book is Stephanie Meeks’ The Past and Future City: How Historic Preservation is Reviving America’s Communities (Washington: Island Press, 2016). Meeks is President and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. She has made a number of presentations about the book where you can see the book’s major points. Continue reading

The End of Marriage: Adultery in the 19th Century


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The Oneida Community Mansion House will host a discussion on Sunday, February 19, at 1 pm, entitled “The End of Marriage! Adultery in the 19th Century,” with historian Carol Faulkner about popular and official 19th century attitudes about marriage and adultery. Faulkner contends that while official society condemned adultery and polyamorous relationships many reformers condemned marriage itself. Continue reading

A History of Mail Order Brides in Early America


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ben_franklins_worldHow do you build colonies without women?

Most of the colonial adventurers from England and France who set out for Jamestown, New France, and colonial Louisiana were men. But how do you build and sustain societies and spread European culture—in essence, fulfill the promises of a colonial program—without women?

You can’t. Which is why Marcia Zug, a Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina Law School and author of Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail Order Matches (NYUPress, 2016),  joins us in this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast to explore one of the solutions that England and France used to build their North American colonies: mail order bride programs. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/120

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Governor Martin Glynn Symposium February 18th


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The Irish American Heritage Museum will host a Governor Martin Glynn Symposium on February 18, 2017 from 10 am to 2 pm. The symposium will take a look at New York’s 40th Governor, and its first Irish American Roman Catholic Governor.

The son of Irish immigrants, Glynn attended public school in Kinderhook and graduated from Fordham University in 1894. While serving in the US Congress (1899-1901), he championed the rights of labor, political reform, and religious tolerance. Glynn was as elected lieutenant governor in 1912. Continue reading

Some History of the Famous Red Barn in Keene


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In late December, the rustic red barn that stood at the intersection of Routes 73 and 9N in Keene was taken down by the Department of Environmental Conservation after it became hazardous.

Although not an officially-recognized historic landmark, many who have traveled through Keene saw the barn, with its majestic High Peaks in the background, as a quaint countryside icon.

Since it came down, folks have waxed nostalgic while mourning the abrupt loss of this unassuming structure. I decided to dig into the barn’s history and see if there was more to it than met the eye. Continue reading

Interview: Michael Perazzini, Johnson Hall Historic Site


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Michael Perazzini, Senior Interpreter at Johnson Hall State Historic Site at Johnstown in Fulton County, joined host Jane E. Wilcox on The Forget-Me-Not Hour to talk about the 18th century history of the Mohawk Valley, with a focus on Sir William Johnson’s role in the Mohawk Valley, his Mohawk consort Molly Brant, the Iroquois and early European settlers in the Valley, and their experiences during the American Revolution. The Mohawk Valley’s history during the war was particularly tumultuous. Michael spotlighted what happened to the Loyalists during and after the war as well and talked about what records can help in researching Mohawk Valley Loyalist ancestors during this period. Continue reading