New Director At Historical Society of Newburgh Bay, Hudson Highlands


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Candace SchusterThe Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands has announced the appointment of Candace Schuster as its new Executive Director.

Beginning this week, Schuster will oversee the administrative functions of the organization, which is headquartered at the Crawford House, 189 Montgomery Street in Newburgh. She will be available in person at the Crawford House on Mondays and Fridays, 2-5 pm, and on Sunday afternoons 1-4 pm during the house’s open season (through October). Continue reading

New Exhibit of Maritime Art Open at Museum Ship Lilac


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Raincoat, metal, ink, thread, paper, strappingNow on view at the museum ship Lilac at Hudson River Park’s Pier 25 in New York City is “Adam Payne: Full Steam Ahead,” an exhibit of maritime art in mixed media.  The exhibit continues through the end of September.

The works are inspired by Adam Payne’s love of history combined with an appreciation for everyday materials. The exhibit includes a series of life jackets begun in 2014 and sewn from old rain slickers, creating a symmetry between materials and form. These grew out of Payne’s longtime interest in nautical explorations and how places are changed by such maritime interventions. Each life jacket incorporates the name of a different “failed” explorer in a nod to this history. Continue reading

Friendships Between Men and Women in the Early Republic


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ben_franklins_worldIn the early American republic, men and women formed and maintained friendships for many of the same reasons we make friends today: companionship, shared interests, and, in some cases, because they helped expand thinking and social circles.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore friendship in the early American republic. Specifically, we investigate what it was like for men and women to form and maintain friendships with each other. Our guide for this exploration is Cassandra Good, author of Founding Friendships: Friendships Between Men & Women in the Early American Republic (Oxford University Press, 2015). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/094

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Historic Clubs and Hotels of the Hamptons Lecture Thursday


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the irving hotel 1920Before they built their own ample cottages, summer visitors to the Hamptons could choose from a variety of hotels and clubs ready to welcome them. On Thursday, August 18th at 5:30 pm in Southampton, Long Island, Anne Surchin will discuss this early period of Hamptons history and the leisure activities that drew the first vacationists to what would later become one of America’s great resort destinations. Continue reading

History In New York: Where Are We Headed?


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Cultural Education Center State Museum ArchivesIs New York’s “historical enterprise” really entering a new phase, as Bruce Dearstyne contends in his recent post? There certainly seems to have been some change going on in the New York State Office of Cultural Education. Perhaps most notably, New York is now employing a full-time State Historian for the first time since 1976 (not 1994, as Bruce suggests).

While this is certainly a step in the right direction, it would be naïve to allege that today’s State Historian position holds the same power and responsibility that it once did. Continue reading

Schoharie County Inns and Hotels Lecture Thursday


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Schoharie County Historian Ted ShuartSchoharie County Historian Ted Shuart is the guest lecturer at the Old Stone Fort Museum on August 18 at 7 pm for the final installment of the Summer Lecture Series.

His topic, “The Inns and Hotels of Schoharie County” will focus on some of the best known inns, hotels, taverns and tavern stories of Schoharie County. He will include a look at some of the historic taverns, most currently private residences, still standing in the area. The program is free and light refreshments will be served. Continue reading

The Double Life of Father Schmidt


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father hans schmidtOn September 5, 1913, Mary Bann, of Woodcliff, New Jersey, and a male companion, were walking near an abandoned dock near the New Jersey side of the Hudson River, when she spotted a bundle resting near the riverbank. It was wrapped in brown paper and tied with twine, and fairly large in size. Though her companion wished to dissuade her from getting near it, Mary had a stubborn mind, thus she hiked down to the side of the river and grabbed the package. She untied the string, unfurled the brown paper and the newspaper under it, and was soon shocked by the sight: it was the upper torso of a young woman. Her companion quickly hurried to find a policeman. Continue reading

Praatjes: 17th-Century New Amsterdam Merchants


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new netherlands praatjesIn the latest episode of the “New Netherland Praatjes” podcast, the New Netherland Institute’s Senior Historian and Education Director Dennis Maika chats with Russell Shorto about Maika’s work on 17th-century New Amsterdam/Manhattan merchants and his work promoting the importance of the seventeenth-century Dutch colony to the New York State Education Department. Topics include the economic structure of the colony, including the role of the Dutch West India Company, and the role of state regulation in the economy. Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading