New Book Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial


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votes for women bookJennifer A. Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton’s new book Votes For Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial (Excelsior Editions, 2017) chronicles the history of the women’s rights and suffrage movements in New York State and examines the important role the state played in the national suffrage movement.

The work for women’s suffrage received a boost more than seventy years before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 when Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and one hundred supporters signed the Declaration of Sentiments asserting that “all men and women are created equal.”

This convention served as a catalyst for debates and action on both the national and state level, and on November 6, 1917, New York State passed the referendum for women’s suffrage. Its passing in New York signaled that the national passage of suffrage would soon follow. On August 18, 1920, “Votes for Women” were constitutionally granted. Continue reading

Liberation: Civil Rights Event at Federal Hall, NYC


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Humanities New York will host a roundtable discussion – Reflections on Liberation: American Civil Rights Past, Present, and Future – on November 28 at 6:30 pm, at Federal Hall, 26 Wall Street, New York.

This roundtable discussion will address the role of social movements in American history and today. Leading writers, thinkers, and artists will guide participants as they cross-examine Civil Rights and other social movement leading up to #BlackLivesMatter.  Continue reading

Oneida County History Center Satellite Bookstore at Sangertown


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oneida county history center logoThe Oneida County History Center will return to Sangertown Square Mall on November 24-26 and December 9-23, 2017 to operate a satellite bookstore near the Macy’s wing.

A large selection of titles will be available for purchase. New titles in 2017 include New Hartford: Images of America, Chenango Canal: The Million Dollar Ditch, and Murder of a Herkimer County Teacher. Returning titles include Heaven’s Ditch: God Gold and Murder on the Erie Canal, Haunted Old Forge, and local history puzzles featuring colorized scenes from Utica and Oneida County.   Continue reading

‘In Harm’s Way’ Exhibit And Gallery Tour


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hurricane irene 2011Nancy Solomon, Director of Long Island Traditions and Curator of the In Harm’s Way exhibition at LIM, will lead a guided tour of the exhibit at the Long Island Museum on Sunday, December 3rd, at 2 pm.

This exhibit focuses on Superstorm Sandy and other historic storms that have affected the region, exploring hurricanes and how communities prepare for natural disasters and rebuild after the storm.  Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Long Island History Podcast Interviews Bill Bleyer


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Bill Bleyer. On the latest episode of the Long Island History Project, we interview author and journalist Bill Bleyer about his long history covering the Island and uncovering its past.

Bill has written books on the Fire Island Lighthouse, Sagamore Hill, and Long Island and the Civil War. He was also a journalist at Newsday for over thirty years and played a key role in the production of Long Island: Our Story.

You’ll hear about working as a journalist on Long Island, his battle with Robert Moses, and more.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Timber Frame Research Group Visits Historic Huguenot Street


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Members of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group examine timber framing in the attic of the Jean Hasbrouck House, Historic Huguenot Street recently hosted the annual meeting of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG) at the 10-acre National Historic Landmark District in the Village of New Paltz.

TTRAG is a special-interest group within the Timber Framers Guild based in Bellingham, Washington, dedicated to serving as a center for information on the centuries-old craft of timber framing. The event brought experts working on timber frame projects on historic buildings, barns, and bridges from around the world to share technical presentations and information. Projects in such diverse locations as Myanmar and Latvia were presented and discussed over the weekend. Continue reading

Benedict Arnold Lecture in Columbia County Nov 21


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benedict arnold bookAward-winning author David C. King is set to give a lecture and sign his new book, Benedict Arnold The Traitor Within on Tuesday, November 21 at 7 pm during a free event, open to the public, at the James Vanderpoel ‘House of History’ in Kinderhook, sponsored by the Columbia County Historical Society Volunteers.

Benedict Arnold is often regarded as an infamous traitor, but he was also one of the nation’s most talented military officers during the American Revolution.   Continue reading

Columbia Students Discover the Power of Protest


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Canon John Collins of St. Paul's Cathedral, speaking for nuclear disarmament at protest in London's Trafalgar Square on April 3, 1961The reckless threats of nuclear war flung back and forth between the North Korean and U.S. governments remind me of an event in which I participated back in the fall of 1961, when I was a senior at Columbia College.

At the end of August 1961, the Soviet government had announced that it was withdrawing from the U.S.-Soviet-British moratorium on nuclear weapons testing that had halted such tests for the previous three years while the three governments tried to agree on a test ban treaty. The resumption of Soviet government’s nuclear weapons testing that followed was topped off that October by its explosion in the atmosphere of a 50-megaton hydrogen bomb, the most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated. Meanwhile, the Kennedy administration, determined not to be outdone in a display of national “strength,” quickly resumed U.S. nuclear testing underground and began to discuss the U.S. resumption of nuclear testing in the atmosphere. Continue reading