New Netherland Manuscript Submissions Due February 1st


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This year the Annual Hendricks Award will be given to a book-length manuscript relating to any aspect of New Netherland and the Dutch colonial experience in North America up to 1776 and its legacy.

The award carries a prize of $5,000, as well as a framed print of Len Tantillo’s painting ‘Fort Orange and the Patroon’s House’.

The prize-winner, chosen by a five-member panel of scholars, is selected in May or June. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Are you glad to see this weekly link list? Do your part my making a contribution to keep the New York History publishing. Use the fundraising page at https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U or send a check to: New York History Blog, 7269 State Route 9, Chestertown, NY 12817
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Camp Upton Featured On Long Island History Project


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long island history project logoThe latest episode of The Long Island History Project heads to Camp Upton. Suzanne Johnson and David Clemens discuss the history of this vast military training camp in Brookhaven that served the US Army in World War I and II.

We focus on their new book on the camp from Arcadia Press that features images from 1917-18 and beyond. Many of the images are drawn from the Longwood Public Library where both Suzanne and David were directors.

You’ll hear about the 77th Division, the Harlem Hellfighters, Irving Berlin, and the amazing feat of raising an army to fight The War to End All Wars. Continue reading

Colonists and Animals in North America


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we study the history of colonial North America, we tend to focus on European colonists and their rivalries with each other and with Native Americans. But humans weren’t the only living beings occupying North America during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

Rivalries existed between humans and animals too. And these human-animal rivalries impacted and shaped how European colonists used and settled North American lands.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Andrea Smalley, an associate professor of history at Northern Illinois University and author of Wild By Nature: North American Animals Confront Colonization (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017), joins us to explore the many ways wild animals shaped colonists’ ideas and behavior as they settled and interacted with North American lands. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/168

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Historic Huguenot Street Hosts ‘Mapping the Patent’


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1709 Draught of the Land granted to Abraham HassbrookOn Saturday, February 17, at 4 pm, Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) will host “Mapping the Patent,” a presentation of the first land survey of the New Paltz patent and its early divisions.

On May 26, 1677, 12 Huguenot refugees signed an agreement with sachems of the Esopus Munsee tribe for approximately 39,683 acres of land that would be called New Paltz.

On September 15, 1677, New York Governor Edmund Andros confirmed the purchase, and on September 29, 1677, Governor Andros issued a patent for the land and made the tract an official township. For 340 years, the tract of land was never officially surveyed – until now. Continue reading

Brooklyn Museum Presenting ‘One Basquiat’


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Jean-Michel Basquiat (American, 1960-1988). Untitled, 1982.The Brooklyn Museum has announced the first museum exhibition of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled” is set to show in the Museum’s Robert E. Blum Gallery from January 26 through March 11, 2018.

Created in 1982, a breakout year in Basquiat’s meteoric career, “Untitled” is emblematic of his early success and ranks among the artist’s most powerful paintings.

One Basquiat is just the latest of many links between the artist and the borough – from his birth at Brooklyn Hospital, to childhood visits to the Brooklyn Museum, where his mother enrolled him as a Junior Member when he was six years old, to the Museum’s retrospective Basquiat in 2005 and its critically acclaimed presentation Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks in 2015. Continue reading

Artist Paul Peabody On Rockland History Podcast


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crossroads of rockland historyThis month on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan featured the 42nd Annual Holiday Exhibition at the Historical Society of Rockland County, entitled “Peace & Joy.”

In addition to miniatures and dollhouses, the exhibition features the art, miniatures and marionettes made by hand by Paul Peabody.

Clare Sheridan’s guest was Jeanne Peabody Walsh, Paul Peabody’s daughter, who spoke about her father’s life, work and art. Continue reading