The Albany Connections of Burr, Hamilton, and Schuyler


By on

6 Comments

Hamilton-burr-duelDuring the Revolutionary War, Alexander Hamilton served as an artillery captain and later a colonel and trusted aid to General George Washington. Colonel Aaron Burr also served in the Colonial Army and accompanied Benedict Arnold on his march through the Maine wilderness and his failed attempt to capture Quebec. Burr had been with General Richard Montgomery when Montgomery was shot and killed in Quebec. Later in the war, Burr was placed in charge of a regiment and his troops were stationed in Westchester County, New York. Continue reading

Legends And Lore Historic Marker Grant Program


By on

1 Comment

Legends and Lore Grant Program - croppedThe William G. Pomeroy Foundation has partnered with the New York Folklore Society to launch a new grant program to promote cultural tourism and commemorate urban legends and folklore as part of the New York’s history.

Folklore is an expression of our common past, yet it draws attention to what is unique about communities. Passed from person to person over time, there is often historical truth at the heart of every legend. Continue reading

NYS Museum Acquires Franklin Co Suffrage Petitions


By on

0 Comments

Franklin County Suffrage PetitionsThe New York State Museum in Albany recently acquired a series of 1917 Franklin County women’s suffrage petitions from Jean Kubaryk, a teacher at North Warren Central School District. Ms. Kubaryk had been displaying the petitions in her classroom for years, but decided to donate the petitions to the Museum so they can be preserved for future generations.

After the petitions were officially acquired by the Museum, staff sent copies of the petitions to Ms. Kubaryk so her students can assist in researching the women who signed the petitions. Continue reading

Fenton History Center’s Pizza and Genealogy Project


By on

0 Comments

fresco(1)Those of us in the local history museum business sometimes struggle to connect with the large segment of the general population that doesn’t see the relevance of history. They are busy with their everyday lives; schedules of work, family and leisure time. Trying to get their attention and then bring them to a history based event can be challenging.

A few years ago at a Fenton History Center Board of Trustee meeting (Fenton History Center is in Jamestown, Chautauqua County, NY) we were brainstorming about how to collect and disseminate more local Italian genealogy and the stories that go with the families involved. One of the Fenton History Center Trustees suggested we hold a pizza judging event. We tabled the idea until last year when we started the “Slice of History Pizza Challenge”. Continue reading

The NY History Blog Needs Your Support


By on

0 Comments

NY HIstory Blog Logo 2015 CampaignLast year your contributions helped The New York History Blog promote news and events related to the state’s history, foster a shared mission among the history community, and provide announcements of upcoming conferences and exhibits, new publications and online resources – and so much more.

Our fundraising campaign for 2015 is underway – and we’re counting on you to keep publishing this year!

If you enjoy The New York History Blog, and find it useful, please become a contributor, or take out an advertisement for your favorite local history organization.

You can make a donation at our Rally.org campaign here: https://rally.org/f/hmP6uuhdXnT

Please don’t hesitate to contact me at nyshistory@gmail.com with questions about advertising and thank you again for your continued support of The New York History Blog.

Building the Erie Canal


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldA “little short of madness.” That is how Thomas Jefferson responded when two delegates from New York approached him with the idea to build the Erie Canal in January 1809.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Janice Fontanella, site manager of Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site in Fort Hunter, New York, joins us to discuss the Erie Canal, its construction, and the impact that this waterway made on New York and the United States. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/028

Continue reading

Saratoga County History Faire May 16th


By on

0 Comments

Saratoga County“The Ballston Spa Trial of Solomon Northup’s Kidnappers”,  a presentation by David Fiske, biographer of Solomon Northup, will be one of four featured presentations at the Saratoga County History Faire at the Clifton Park-Halfmoon Library, in Clifton Park, New York, on May 16, 2015.   David Fiske will be the first speaker at 10:30 am.

Solomon Northup, the subject of the Oscar-winning film 12 Years a Slave, was lured away from Saratoga Springs in 1841 and sold into slavery. After being a slave for years, he was rescued and returned to New York State, and authored a book about his experiences. Continue reading

Rethinking Outreach by Moving Outside the Museum


By on

1 Comment

Iszards Store Window DisplayThe Chemung County Historical Society has been working with new partners and new programs as part of our effort to be a greater presence in our community. As director, I feel that it is imperative that the museum be a part of everyday community life, analogous to our local library. In order to make a greater impact on our community, we need to find better ways to entice community members to visit our museum and for us to meet our fellow citizens where they are.

Over the past eighteen months, the CCHS has had the opportunity to place new exhibits throughout our community, develop new programming with an unexpected partner and strengthen ties to a traditional partner. Continue reading

Essex County’s William Rush Merriam (Part 2)


By on

1 Comment

x2A NYHMerriamMansIn November 1890, William Merriam ran again and won a second term as Minnesota’s governor, serving until January 1893.

Through the 1880s, as his status had grown from business and political successes, Merriam’s social position had elevated as well. Laura, already very well-connected, had become the leading socialite in Minnesota’s capital city. The Merriam mansion, next door to an even grander home owned by his father, John, became the hub of social activity. Extravagant parties were hosted frequently, and there was no more valued honor for visiting dignitaries than an invitation to the Merriam mansion. At three stories high, it held a vast library, artwork from the world’s masters, and featured multiple balconies, fireplaces, and porches. Continue reading

Women Workers In Amsterdam’s Carpet Mills


By on

2 Comments

Amersterdam Mill WorkerModestly but eloquently, Sue Fraczek described her life as an Amsterdam mill worker, “When I went to work, I was scared to death. It was my first time in a carpet mill. It was hot. It was noisy.”

Fraczek was surprised to see herself as a young mill worker in a still picture prominently featured in “Historic Views of the Carpet City,” the WMHT-TV documentary on Amsterdam first shown in 2000. Co-producer Steve Dunn chose the picture of the young woman at a yarn twisting machine to symbolize the documentary that he and I produced. Continue reading

‘Humanities in the Public Square’ Grant Opportunity


By on

0 Comments

NEHThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has announced a new grant opportunity called “Humanities in the Public Square” that will put humanities scholars in direct dialogue with the public on some of the most pressing issues of today –  through public forums, community programs, and the development of educational resources.

This new grant opportunity is part of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ agency-wide initiative The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life. Continue reading

At Morris-Jumel Mansion, The Story of Eliza Jumel


By on

0 Comments

Morris-Jumel MansionEliza Jumel rose from poverty to become one of New York’s richest women with the help of a fortune acquired from her first husband, Stephen Jumel. His own origins, until now shrouded in mystery, will be revealed in an illustrated lecture at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Saturday, May 16, at 2 pm.

Speaker Margaret A. Oppenheimer, author of a forthcoming, legend-busting biography of Eliza, will disclose previously unknown details of Stephen’s parentage and youth. Continue reading

Freedom Journey: Westchester Co Black Civil War Soldiers


By on

0 Comments

Freedoms Journey Black Civil War SoldiersAlmost 200,000 black men served in the Army during the Civil War, but only 34,000 were from the North. An underrepresented segment in Civil War studies, the stories of some of these Northern soldiers are told in Edythe Ann Quinn’s Freedom Journey: Black Civil War Soldiers and the Hills Community, Westchester County, New York (SUNY Press, 2015).

Freedom Journey presents in-depth, personal histories of thirty-six free black men from New York State who fought in the war. The book is both an African-American community history and a Civil War history of three regiments of the United States Colored Troops (USCT). Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


By on

0 Comments

Continue reading

Bruce Dearstyne On The Historians Podcast


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features Bruce Dearstyne discussing his new book The Spirit of New York: Defining Events in the Empire State’s History (SUNY Press, 2015) From the first state constitution to the New York Fire Department response to the 9-11 attacks, Dearstyne takes a look at 16 key events. Dearstyne is a history professor emeritus,  a former director of the New York State archives, and a regular contributor to The New York History Blog. Listen at “The Historians” online archive at http://www.bobcudmore.com/thehistorians/
Continue reading

Fenian Raids Living History Event This Weekend


By on

0 Comments

Fenian RaidersOn Saturday, May 9 and Sunday May 10, the Old Stone Fort Museum Complex in Schoharie, NY will host an encampment and interactive program on the 1866 Fenian Raids.

The Fenian Raids of 1866 were conceived by a faction of the Fenian Brotherhood, organized in America to fight for the independence of Ireland from Britain. Many of the men were Irish-Americans who had fought in the Civil War. Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


By on

0 Comments

Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,700 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

20th Annual Seven Years’ War College Deadline


By on

0 Comments

Fort Ticonderoga From Mount DefianceFort Ticonderoga will host its Twentieth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 15-17, 2015. This annual conference focuses on the French & Indian War in North America (1754-1763), bringing together a panel of distinguished historians from around the country and beyond.

The War College takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center and is open to the public; pre-registration is required. The registration deadline for this seminar is this Friday May 8, 2015. Continue reading