Category Archives: Public History

County and Borough Historians’ Institute Announced


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office of state historyOn August 25th, 2017 from 9 am to 5 pm the County and Borough Historians’ Institute will be held at the New York State Museum Huxley Theater, 222 Madison Avenue, Albany.

The County and Borough Historian’s Institute is a free learning opportunity for County and Borough Historians hosted by the Office of Cultural Education and facilitated by the New York State Historian, the Association of Public Historians of New York State and the Government Appointed Historians of Western New York.  Continue reading

New Book on Environmental Movement Illustrates Uses of History


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Climate of HopeA new book by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former executive director of the Sierra Club Carl Pope illustrates some interesting uses of history.

Climate of Hope: How Cities, Business and Citizens Can Save the Planet (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2017) discusses how cities, businesses, and individuals can take action to confront global warming and improve the environment. There are lots of interesting examples and proposals. But these three themes may be of particular interest to readers of The New York History Blog. Continue reading

The Origin and Impact of the Adirondack Northway


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i87When my parents came to the Adirondacks in 1956, they believed they were moving to a place far removed – culturally and politically as well as geographically – from the cities in which they had worked as left-wing journalists.

Beyond the Adirondacks lay “the big world,” as our neighbor Peggy Hamilton called it. (It was a world she was familiar with, having been the companion of Vida Mulholland and, like Vida and her more famous sister Inez, an early advocate of women’s rights.) Continue reading

College Basketball, Point Shaving and the Catskills


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Junius KelloggIn late February, 1951, the basketball team from the City College of New York was returning home on the train from Philadelphia where they had just trounced the Temple University squad.

The year before, the Lavender and Black had been hailed as one of the greatest college basketball teams of all time, having won both of college basketball’s biggest post season tournaments, the NCAA and the NIT, the only time that feat has ever been accomplished. The talented squad had stumbled somewhat during the current season, losing to several teams it had been expected to beat, but was seemingly hitting its stride just as the tournaments were about to begin. Continue reading

Saratoga NHP Announces 58% Visitation Increase in 2016


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2016 marked a banner year for visitation at Saratoga National Historical Park. Over 102,000 people visited the park during the 100th anniversary year of the National Park Service.

This was a 58% increase in park visitation from 2015. The park witnessed an increase in visitors attending ranger programs, special events, hiking and cycling, and touring the park’s historic sites, according to the Park Service. Continue reading

New Approaches for Historical Societies and History Museums


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Many of the posts in this New York History Blog report on new exhibits, public programs, outreach to schools, and other initiatives. This variety of initiatives reflects the fact that here in New York we have some of the most progressive, innovative programs in the nation.

But are there really any new ideas out there – new ways of looking at and carrying out our mission as historical societies, history museums, and other public history programs? Continue reading

History Columnist Dan Weaver on ‘The Historians’ Podcast


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The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, Amsterdam (NY) Recorder history columnist Dan Weaver describes actress: Debbie Reynolds’s connection to Amsterdam. Weaver also talks about the Cabbage Patch doll and Coleco and the story of Derby, the blind proprietor of a newsstand in the Amsterdam post office. Weaver owns The Book Hound bookstore in Amsterdam.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

Lecture on the Mohawk Schoharie Indians March 7th


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De Wilden Hoek The second installment of the Old Stone Fort Museum’s winter lecture series will be held on Tuesday, March 7 at 7 pm in the museum’s Badgley Annex.

Local historian Jeff O’Connor will present “The Schoharie Indians – Who Were They and Why Were They Here?” His program will explore the appearance of Mohawk people in the Schoharie Valley before the arrival of the Palatines. Continue reading