Category Archives: History

New York History

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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Future of Museums Conference July 24th


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squareThe Future of Museums Conference, a collaborative global conversation about technology, museums, and the future will be a free, online event held from 10am – 5pm US-Eastern Time on July 24th, 2014, and will feature keynote speakers and crowdsourced presentations.

Attendees can expect to learn best practices to implement in their museums, and will hear real-world examples of innovative practices in the field. Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

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A Report From The NYS History Commission Roundtable


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nycapitolOn May 29, Assemblyman Steve Englebright (Suffolk) convened a roundtable for the proposed New York State History Commission. Also in attendance were Assemblywoman Margaret Markey (Queens) and Senator George Latimer (Westchester), the senator from my district who had just become a co-sponsor.

Invited participants with name cards sat around the table. In addition there were about six of us who attended the public meeting as a result of my post to The New York History Blog. Assemblyman Englebright graciously allowed us to participate in the discussion along with those invited. I consider this meeting to have been a fact-finding or information-gathering meeting by the legislators who were seeking to learn the state of affairs in the New York history community. Continue reading

State and Local History Awards Announced


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LeadershipInHistory_004The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) has announced the winners of the 69th annual Leadership in History Awards, which recognizes achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history.

This year, AASLH conferred seventy-seven national awards honoring people, projects, exhibits, books, and organizations. The only winner in New York State was Laurence M. Hauptman for the publication In the Shadow of Kinzua: The Seneca Nation of Indians since World War II. In contrast, Pennsylvania had 10 awardees. Continue reading

Susan B Anthony Museum And House Legacy Trip


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Susan B Anthony HouseThere is a one-time event this summer, August 4-7, at the National Susan B Anthony Museum & House in Rochester NY. Tours, talks and entertainment have combined in such a way to create an in-depth experience in the story of the 19th century with the development of the great social revolution called the Women’s Suffrage Movement.

The Susan B Anthony Legacy Trip invites participants to become part of “Her Story” on this 4-day, 3-night visit to historic Rochester and Finger Lakes region of New York, August 4-7, 2014. Continue reading

Grossinger’s: A History Lesson In Economic Development


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grosslongbrookIn the wake of the recent decision by Foxwoods Catskills Resort not to submit an application for a destination casino in Liberty — some in Sullivan County are wringing their hands. There are many comments being circulated along the lines of, “the last one out turn off the lights…”

Notwithstanding the fact that there are still two viable casino projects in the works for Sullivan County, perhaps it is a good time for a history lesson for all of those who are beginning to feel a bit desperate about the area’s future prospects. And since the Foxwoods proposal that will not be submitted to the State Gaming Commission involved the Grossinger’s property, once home to what was arguably the most famous resort in the world, perhaps it is appropriate that the history lesson begins there. Continue reading

Exhibit Highlights Historic Ships At Steamship Lilac


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Hero Lilac in engine roomThe museum ship Lilac has opened for the summer at Hudson River Park’s Pier 25.  The exhibition Hero Project will be on view there through June 30.

With photographs by Jonathan Atkin, Hero Project is a selection from his on-going work-in-progress collaboration with dance artists aboard historic ships.  His mission is to increase visibility of our maritime heritage by reaching new non-maritime audiences. In the exhibition, dancers athletically grace the gritty vessels in oversize photographs mounted throughout Lilac, from the bridge to the engine room. For more on the project, see http://www.heroproject.us Continue reading

Nonprofit Revitalization Act Impacts Outlined


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unnamed(19)The New York Council of Nonprofits (NYCON) has created a document about the the impact of the Nonprofit Revitalization Act on nonprofit governance and policy-making.

The act becomes law July 1, 2014 and effects ALL nonprofits in the state, no matter the size. The brief outline created by NYCON provides an overview of key reforms that NYCON believes can have a meaningful effect on the general governance and business operations of existing community-based nonprofits.  You can access the document via a pdf located here.

 

NYS History Education: A View From the Street


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Charging_Bull_statueI recently returned from the 35th annual conference on New York State History in Poughkeepsie, which I attended for the first time. I understand this was the largest convocation of history professionals in New York State, and that the attendance at this conference was the highest ever. As my perspective and background is perhaps slightly different from most attendees at the conference, I feel it appropriate to provide certain observations.

Unfortunately, while others at the conference were somewhat more upbeat, my perception is that for the reasons set forth below there is at all levels an appalling lack of knowledge about critical elements of the history of New York State, and that we as a society suffer from this lack of knowledge every day. While I believe there are individuals in the history community who are in good faith seeking to address this problem, I am not sure that the efforts are close to adequate.

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Summer Festival at Kanatsiohareke This Weekend


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Strawberry FEstivalThe Kanatsiohareke (Gah-Nah-Joe-Hah- Lay- Gay) Summer Festival is a family-friendly celebration of Mohawk culture that is shared with friends, relatives, volunteers and everybody in the local Mohawk River Valley community.

The event includes Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) storytelling, dancing, music and culture as well as contemporary music. Vendors will be selling Native American art works and crafts. Food will include some traditional Mohawk dishes as well as organic grass-fed beef. Continue reading

Bus Tour To Drums Along the Mohawk Outdoor Drama


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Home of General Nicholas HerkimerAmerican Heritage Living History Productions and the Historical Society of Rockland County have teamed up to offer:  “Drums Along the Mohawk” overnight, guided bus tour. This attraction dense trip occurs on Saturday August 9th and Sunday August 10th, 2014.

There will be two convenient departure and return points that take you to 12 upstate New York locations. The on-board guide, step-on guides, and off-bus docents will add rich commentary to enhance the factual aspects of the story. Continue reading

Enhanced Auto-Camping Nearly A Century Ago


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Airdmore headlineCamping in the Adirondacks, popular now for well beyond a century, has evolved with the changing times. Roughing it in open lean-tos and makeshift shelters was largely supplanted by tent camping. Then, with the advent of the automobile, the mountains would never be the same. Auto-camping became hugely popular in a very short time. As the price of cars dropped to where the average worker could afford one, thousands of families took to the road to get away from it all, strapping tents, blankets, fishing equipment, and other gear to their vehicles. Continue reading

Henry B. Stanton: Abolitionist, Women’s Rights Advocate


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Henry Brewster StantonThe great genius behind the First Women’s Right Convention was Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and it marked her entrance into the women’s rights movement.  What did her spouse think of all this?  Was he supportive?  Was he also a women’s rights activist?

On Saturday, June 28th, the National Park Service at Women’s Rights National Historical Park will offer a special program entitled “Henry B. Stanton: The Great Man behind the Great Woman” presented by Linda C. Frank, Ph. D.  The program will begin at 1:30 pm in the Wesleyan Chapel at 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls.  The program is offered free of charge and the public is invited to attend. Continue reading

Proposed Museum of Political Corruption Seeks Support


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Museum of Political CorruptionThere is a campaign to build The Museum of Political Corruption in Albany, New York. The campaign was started by and is being lead by College of Saint Rose Professor Bruce Craig Roter. With it’s motto of “it’s funny, but it’s serious”, it’s hoped the Museum will be a unique tourist attraction.

The museum is expected to serve as a reminder and cautionary tale to elected officials to uphold the high ethical standards demanded of their offices. “While there will be a good amount of humor, it will be used as a gateway to examine the serious subject of corruption in NY state politics,” Roter told The New York History Blog. “Museum goers will pay entrance bribes rather than fees, refreshments will be served at the Cozy Crony Cafe, and the museum auditorium will be called Tammany Hall.” Continue reading

Cultural Heritage Fail: The American Revolution in NYS


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John Van Arsdale raising the american flag over Fort GeorgeNew York was an object of great importance during the American Revolution. At the kick off of the Path through History project in August 2012, plenary speaker Ken Jackson, Columbia University, criticized New York for its inadequate efforts to tell its story compared to what Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts are doing. He welcomed the opportunity that New York finally was going to get it right.

By coincidence, at the New York History community roundtable convened by Assemblyman Englebright several weeks ago in connection with his proposed New York History Commission, he began with a similar plea for New York to tell its story as well as those same states Jackson had mentioned 20 months earlier. He was particularly incensed over the new TV show Turn about America’s first spy ring set in the very community he represents. Continue reading

The Search for the Underground Railroad in Upstate NY


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Underground RR in Upstate NYAs the Civil War loomed and politicians from the North and South debated the fate of slavery, brave New Yorkers risked their lives to help fugitive slaves escape bondage. Because of its clandestine nature, much of the history of the Underground Railroad remains shrouded in secrecy—so much so that some historians have even doubted its importance.

After decades of research, Tom Calarco recounts his experiences compiling evidence to give credence to the legend’s oral history in a new book The Search for the Underground Railroad in Upstate New York (History Press, 2014). Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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‘ArtoD2′ Robot Featured in Land of Makebelieve Exhibit


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ArtoD2.ADKHISTCTRHow does the much-loved little robot from Star Wars connect with Essex County History? Answer: He is “ArtoD2,” built by Essex County native Arto Monaco, creator of the Land of Makebelieve. Monaco’s work is a featured exhibit running through October 13 at the Adirondack History Center and Essex County Historical Society in Elizabethtown.

Lynda Denton, Monaco’s niece and long-time assistant, says the model was constructed “just for fun” soon after the first Star Wars movie came out.   It was operated with a model airplane remote control and included a tape with sound effects. Continue reading