Category Archives: History

New York History

Review: The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel


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the remarkable rise of Eliza JumelShe’s the woman who dueled with Aaron Burr and won. Move over Alexander Hamilton. The life of Eliza Jumel is a tale about a woman who pulled hard on her Yankee bootstraps to make good on the American dream.

Margaret Oppenheimer’s splendid book, The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: Marriage and Money in the Early Republic (Chicago Review Press, 2015), takes readers along on a tale of intrigue, scandal and innuendo. Far from a steamy beach read featuring men in white wigs, this meticulously-researched tale paints a detailed and scholarly portrait of New York City and the way in which the city’s growth provided fertile ground for the ambitions of its heroine. Continue reading

Hamilton County Plans Bicentennial Celebration


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hamilton county bicentenial logoThe celebration of Hamilton County’s bicentennial begins on April 12th, 200 years to the day after the provisional creation of the county in 1816.

The year of events gets started at 10:30 am April 12 with a birthday party for the county, held at the County Courthouse in Lake Pleasant. State Senator Hugh Farley and Assemblyman Mark Butler will join other officials on the steps of the courthouse. A small reception with birthday cake will follow, and Hamilton County Historian Eliza Darling will offer tours of the historic county complex. Continue reading

How Archives Work: Massachusetts Historical Society


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ben_franklins_worldHistorians research history in archives.

But how do you gain access to one? And how do you use an archive once you find that it likely contains the information you seek?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we investigate how archives work with Peter Drummey, an archivist and the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at the Massachusetts Historical Society. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/075

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New York State Family History Conference Planned


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New York State Family History ConferenceThe third annual New York State Family History Conference (NYSFHC) will be held September 15–17, 2016 in Syracuse. This event will bring together hundreds of genealogists from across the United States to learn about their New York ancestry.

This year, the event will run concurrently with the annual conference of the Association for Public Historians of New York State (APHNYS). As part of the concurrent conferences, attendees of the NYSFHC Conference will be welcome to attend APHNYS lectures and field trips, and APHNYS registrants will be welcomed to attend NYSFHC lectures. Continue reading

New Book: Fading Structures in the Finger Lakes


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Tfading structures in the finger lakes bookhe new book Fading Structures in the Finger Lakes: Images and Verse (Fast Pencil, 2015) by Michael W. Duttweiler explores 24 structures in the Central Finger Lake Region. These structures once stood strong, but have since been run down and abandoned.

Each image is paired with a poem conveying the allure and intrigue of the deserted structures. Poems by Conant, Kilmer, Frost, Dickinson, Whitman, Tennyson and other well-known authors are included.

Duttweiler hopes that by conveying the beauty of these fading structures, local organizations will be encouraged to support historic preservation. Continue reading

Art Deco Mailboxes: An Illustrated History


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art deco mailboxesArt Deco Mailboxes: An Illustrated Design History (W.W Norton & Co., 2015) by Karen Greene and Lynne Lavelle features a full-color photographic survey of early mailboxes, located in New York City, Chicago, Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and beyond. Many of these mailboxes have since been removed, forgotten, disused, or painted over, others are still in use, are polished daily, and hold a place of pride in lobbies throughout the country.

As American art deco architecture flourished in the 1920s and 1930s, mailboxes and their chutes became focal points in landmark buildings and public spaces such as the GE Building, Grand Central Terminal, the Woolworth Building, 29 Broadway, the St. Regis Hotel, the Waldorf Astoria, and more. Continue reading