Category Archives: History

New York History

New Logo for Oneida County History Center


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oneida county history center logoOn January 1, 2017 the Oneida County Historical Society became the Oneida County History Center (OCHC).

The Oneida County History Center stated that their name has changed, but their mission hasn’t – to preserve the past as a source of information and enlightenment for those who are living today, and for our descendants.  They have announced a new logo to coincide with the new name. Continue reading

Political Allegiance in the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldIn December 1773, the Cape Cod Tea Crisis revealed that the people of “radical” Massachusetts were far from united in their support for the American Revolution. An observation that leads us to wonder: How many Americans supported the Patriot cause?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we speak with four scholars to explore the complexities of political allegiance during the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/123

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Underground RR Project Holding Public History Convention


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Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region will hold its 16th annual public history convention, Liberty Con 2017 – Americans@Risk: Race, Denial, privilege, and Who Matters, on March 24 to 25 at Schenectady County Community College and on March 26 at The Stephen and Harriet Myers Residence in Albany.

Attendees will be able to explore race relations, gender issues, immigration reform, white privilege, and religion, and their relationship with American history. As well as dialogue about action responses through a series of workshops, roundtable conversations, and keynote speakers. Continue reading

Uncle Johnny’s Girl Farm: Pulp Magazines and Utopian Fantasies


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Oneida Community Mansion House On Sunday, March 19th at 1 pm, the Oneida Community Mansion House (OCMH) will host Dr. Molly Jessup as she speaks about mid-twentieth century male escapism and pulp fiction fantasies in her presentation Uncle Johnny’s Girl Farm: Escapism Through Utopian Fantasy.

Today, the Oneida Community is known for its utopian social practices, including equality between women and men. But in the 1950s and 1960s, a number of men’s magazines, such as Man’s Conquest and Men, published salacious stories about “Uncle Johnny’s girl farm” and “the sex cult that rocked New York.” Continue reading

Interview: German Churches in Metropolitan New York


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Dr. Richard Haberstroh, author of German Churches in Metropolitan New York: A Research Guide, joined host Jane E. Wilcox on the Forget-Me-Not Hour podcast this week. Richard talked about Germans in the New York City metro area – their political and religious history in Germany, why they came to New York, where they settled, and what churches they organized here. Richard also discussed his book (published by the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society) and gave some tips on researching German ancestors in the New York City area.

Listen on-demand here. Continue reading

A History of American Women in Song Performance


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linda russellOn Saturday, March 11, Historic Huguenot Street will host a performance by Linda Russell in honor of Women’s History Month in the Crispell Memorial French Church.

Russell’s performance, “A History of American Women in Song,” will explore the role of women’s lives in society from the 18th century to the 19th Amendment, featuring broadsides, laments, murder ballads, love songs, parlor melodies, and suffrage anthems that reflect the changing status of women in society. Continue reading

In Climbing Mt Washington, Darby Field May Have Sought Lake Champlain


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Samuel de Champlain 1632 mapIn the history of mountain climbing in New England, the first ascent of Mt. Washington happened in 1642 with Darby Field as the climber.

Over the years, however, there has been great speculation as to the route that Field took to the summit. Most early speculation assumed that his main goal was to climb the mountain, and that he then took the most direct route as he came in from the Maine coast.

That route would have taken him up the Cutler River and then up the southeast side of Mt. Washington, the Northeast’s tallest mountain. This is the side with Pinkham Notch and Tuckermans Ravine. For many years, this was the “conventional wisdom” regarding this ascent. Then, as referenced in the article below, an ancient letter surfaced that indicated Field had taken an entirely different route to the summit. This different route, as described in the Watermans’ Forest and Crag (1989), included going over several other summits and passing by what are now known as “Lakes of the Clouds.” With this new evidence, the Watermans could clear up much of the earlier speculation regarding Field’s route, but they still admitted that they did not know why Field climbed Mt. Washington. Continue reading

Sagamore Hill Artifacts Now Available Online


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Over 200 artifacts from Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill National Historic Site can be viewed online on Google Arts & Culture by people around the world due to a new partnership between Google and the National Park Service.

With this new virtual collection, users will be able to step into the rooms of Theodore Roosevelt’s home and Summer White House to see his Rough Rider hat and saber from the Spanish American War, his Bronco Buster bronze sculpture by Frederic Remington, the Cape Buffalo taxidermy trophy taken by Roosevelt during his 1909-1910 African safari, and many other treasures of the museum, here. Continue reading

History Columnist Dan Weaver on ‘The Historians’ Podcast


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The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, Amsterdam (NY) Recorder history columnist Dan Weaver describes actress: Debbie Reynolds’s connection to Amsterdam. Weaver also talks about the Cabbage Patch doll and Coleco and the story of Derby, the blind proprietor of a newsstand in the Amsterdam post office. Weaver owns The Book Hound bookstore in Amsterdam.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading