Category Archives: History

New York History

Woodsmen’s Festival Set For Hanford Mills Museum


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woodsman axe demoThis years Woodsmen’s Festival at Hanford Mills Museum, will be held on Saturday, October 14. The Woodsmen’s Club of the SUNY College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill, which competes nationally, will be demonstrating their lumberjack skills, including overhand and underhand chop, ax throwing, and cross cut sawing.

The Woodsmen’s Festival, which runs from 10 am to 4 pm, also features music, horse-drawn wagon rides, kids’ activities, and exhibits by woodworkers, forestry organizations, and local businesses and organizations. Visitors also can see the historic water-powered sawmill, gristmill and woodworking shop operating just as it did a century ago. Continue reading

Annual Candlelight Tour Set For Historic Schuyler House


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Schuyler house Candlelight TourThe Historic Schuyler House will hold their annual annual Candlelight Tour on Saturday, October 14, 2017 from 6 to 8 pm. Visitors will be able to walk the floors and hear the stories of the Schuyler family and their many visitors including George Washington and Alexander Hamilton.

Old Saratoga Historical Association hosts the annual Candlelight Tour of General Philip Schuyler’s 1777 country house. Their members will join park staff and volunteers to guide visitors on short tours throughout the evening. Light refreshments will be served. Continue reading

Major Thomas Cole Exhibit Planned For The Met


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View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Mass, after a thunderstorm, by thomas coleA new Thomas Cole exhibition entitled Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings is opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 30, 2018 and traveling to the National Gallery, London in June 2018.

Thomas Cole’s Journey is curated by Elizabeth Kornhauser, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor in the History of Art, Yale University, and Christopher Riopelle, Curator of Post 1800 Paintings, National Gallery, London. Continue reading

Freedoms We Lost in the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldDeclaring independence from Great Britain required the formation of new governments.

But why did Americans want and need new governments? And how did their interactions and experiences with their old, colonial governments inform their decisions to create new governments?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Barbara Clark Smith, a curator in the division of political history at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the author of The Freedoms We Lost: Consent and Resistance in Revolutionary America (The New Press, 2010), leads us on an exploration of how Americans interacted with their government before the American Revolution and how the Revolution changed their interaction and ideas about government. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/154

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Schenectady Votes For Women Reading & Discussion Group


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votes for women2017 marks the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in New York State, and this fall, Humanities New York is exploring the subject with a reading and discussion group.

Union College Professor Andrea Foroughi will leads the group through six evenings of book discussion. The book selections include history, biography, and fiction, and provide a window into this chapter of American social progress and a springboard into ongoing discussions of women’s history. Continue reading

Roosevelt Island Lecture: History of Affordable Housing in NYC


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eastwood buildingThe Roosevelt Island Historical Society (RIHS) has invited the public to the first of four free lectures: Eastwood and the History of Affordable Housing in New York City by Matthias Altwicker, Architect, at the New York Public Library Branch on Roosevelt Island, on Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 6:30 pm.

In this lecture, architect Matthias Altwicker who is Associate Professor and Chair at the School of Architecture and Design of the New York Institute of Technology, will discuss the history of Eastwood and the contributions of its designer, noted architect Josep Lluís Sert, then Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Mr. Altwicker will also discuss the origins and progress of affordable housing in New York City. Continue reading

Albany: Telling The Truth In A Post-Truth World


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kurt andersonThe New York State Writers Institute will hold a  two-day symposium, Telling the Truth in a Post-Truth World, October 12th to 14th, which will feature guests of interest to the history community, including Douglas Brinkley on a panel about the American Presidency with Bob Schieffer; David Daley, former editor of Salon, with Ratf**ked, a history of gerrymandering and vote-rigging; recent Lt. Gov. candidate Tim Wu, with a new book on the history of advertising, The Attention Merchants; Carol Anderson, with her current bestselling history of white resentment, White Rage; Pamela Newkirk, author of a history of African Americans in journalism; Kurt Andersen, with a grand history of American flimflammery and snake oil salesmanship, Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire, and more.

The multi-event symposium will cover topics crucial to an open democratic society.  All members of the general public are invited to following events. Everything is free and unticketed, apart from the first event, which requires a book purchase to raise money for programming. Continue reading

NYC Event: New Amsterdam in the Dutch Atlantic


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new amsterdam history centerThe New Amsterdam History Center will host historians Wim Klooster and Dennis J. Maika who will give a presentation, New Amsterdam in the Dutch Atlantic: A Dialogue About Trade and Entrepreneurship on the 17th Century World Stage, on Monday November 6, from 6:30 to 8 pm.

Klooster and Maika will exchange ideas and perceptions on such topics as the operation of both state-sponsored commercial monopolies and private entrepreneurship, the practical aspects of arranging trade, cooperation as well as competition between representatives of European empires, the impact of “sustained warfare” in the seventeenth century, and finally, the Dutch commercial legacy in both the Atlantic World and New York. Continue reading