Category Archives: History

New York History

Maritime Museum Offering Riveted Steel Structure Workshop


By on

0 Comments

The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum will offer a four day Riveted Steel Structure Workshop on May 20-21 and 27-28, 2017. In this hands-on workshop for ages 16+, participants will learn the basics to the craft of riveting from Instructor Jeff Dardozzi, while participating in the creation of a full-scale riveted steel and timber structure to be erected on site by the participants. The workshop will also include a tour of one of the oldest riveted steel ships on Lake Champlain. The workshop will be held from 9 am to 4 pm each day. Workshop fee is $300, $275 for Lake Champlain Maritime Museum members. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


By on

0 Comments

Continue reading

Peter Hess Describes Early 1800s Albany


By on

4 Comments

Albany NY in the early 1800s by James EightsIn the year 1800, Albany was peaceful and prosperous. The Revolutionary War was over and the conflicts leading to the War of 1812 had not yet surfaced. The Dutch of Albany did what they did best, manufactured products and conducted trade. Van Rensselaers, Schuylers, Lansings, Yates, Livingstons, Gansevoorts, Bleeckers and Ten Broecks were still around and still dominated Albany.

On the northwest corner of State (previously Jonkers Street) and Pearl Streets, the center of Albany at the time, stood the giant elm tree planted in front of the home of Philip Livingston, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Livingston had planted the elm around 1750 and this corner was known as the Elm Tree Corner for the next 150 years. Continue reading

Children Who Served In The Civil War


By on

0 Comments

Johnny Clem On Thursday, April 27, from 7 pm to 9 pm. at the Senior Center (next to the Florida Library), at 4 Cohen Circle in Florida, NY, Civil War historian and re-enactor Yvonne Bigney will tell the story of 12 year-old Johnny Clem’s experience in the Battle of Chickamauga.

Clem was one of many children who served in the Civil War.  In 1863, escaped slave, “Contraband Jackson”, served as a drummer boy and stretcher-bearer in the 79th Infantry Regiment – U.S. Colored Troops. It was an all-black unit that incurred heavy casualties. Fifteen year-old Tillie Pierce served as a nurse at Gettysburg. They were just three of the thousands of boys and girls engaged in the Civil War; whether on the front lines or back home, active in vital adult roles that would astonish us today. Continue reading

Nineteenth Century St. Lawrence County in 3-D


By on

0 Comments

 stereograph of Hatfield House in Massena Springs, ca. 1890Tom French, author of River Views: A History of the 1000 Islands in 3-D, will give a presentation on nineteenth century stereographs, three-dimensional photographs, of St. Lawrence County and the Thousand Islands at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association on Thursday, April 20th at noon, as part of their monthly Brown Bag Lunch Series. Brown Bag Lunches are free and open to the public: bring your own lunch, complimentary beverages and dessert will be provided by the SLCHA. Continue reading

American Revolutions: A Continental History


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldHistorians often portray the American Revolution as an orderly, if violent, event that moved from British colonists’ high-minded ideas about freedom  to American independence from Great Britain and the ratification of the Constitution of 1787.

But was the American Revolution an orderly event that took place only between Great Britain and her North American colonists? Was it really about high-minded ideas?

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Alan Taylor joins us on Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History to explore the American Revolution as a Continental event with details from his book, American Revolutions: A Continental History. 1750-1804 (W.W. Norton & Company, 2016). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/128

Continue reading

Unpacking Long Island’s Support For World War One


By on

1 Comment

Chancellor Von Bethmann-Hollweg“New York State has prepared for war.” The headlines of the South Side Signal for April 6, 1917 announced the entry of the United States into conflict. “Local War Notes,” a new feature (later, simply, “War Notes,”) would chronicle Long Island developments through armistice.

On April 6th , it was announced, that, among other news items, Edwin N. Post, R.N. had been appointed head of the enrolling party for the naval reserves, establishing recruiting headquarters over Smith and Salmon’s drugstore in Babylon village. Recruits thronging to Babylon village, seventeen had already enrolled at Sayville and another fifteen at Bay Shore. Legislation had been introduced to increase the size of the naval militia, allow the state to appropriate lands, and expand punishments to those showing disrespect to the flag. Continue reading