Category Archives: History

New York History

New Approaches for Historical Societies and History Museums


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Many of the posts in this New York History Blog report on new exhibits, public programs, outreach to schools, and other initiatives. This variety of initiatives reflects the fact that here in New York we have some of the most progressive, innovative programs in the nation.

But are there really any new ideas out there – new ways of looking at and carrying out our mission as historical societies, history museums, and other public history programs? Continue reading

New Exhibit: Black Radical Women 1965-85


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Jan van Raay A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum continues with We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85.

Focusing on the work of more than forty black women artists from an under-recognized generation, the exhibition highlights a group of artists who committed themselves to activism during a period of profound social change marked by the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the Women’s Movement, the Anti-War Movement, and the Gay Liberation Movement, among others. Continue reading

Joseph Brant’s 1780 Attack On Canajoharie


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joseph brantThe American Revolution Round Table (ARRT) of the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys will host Wayne Lenig, who will give a presentation entitled Joseph Brant’s 1780 Attack on Canajohary.

Original accounts of the August 2nd raid began appearing in major newspapers about two weeks after the attack. A newspaper account dated September 9, 1780 stated the following: “At the fort now called fort Ransalaer (Fort Plain), Sir John Johnson and Captain Brant have burnt 51 houses, 42 barns, 17 killed, and 52 prisoners.”

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Crown Point’s Overlooked Role in Freeing Boston, 1776


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A few weeks ago in this space appeared the story of Gershom Beach’s remarkable 24-hour recruiting hike in Vermont, rounding up Green Mountain Boys to join their leader, Ethan Allen, in capturing Fort Ticonderoga on the New York side of Lake Champlain. In the end, their combined efforts played a critical role in George Washington’s American troops driving the British from Boston, for the armaments he used came from Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Men serving under Colonel Henry Knox completed the delivery, carrying them south to Albany and east to Boston.

Typically shortchanged in that famous story is the fort at Crown Point, which was captured two days after Ticonderoga fell. Seth Warner, a name very familiar to historians in connection with other military campaigns, commanded the troops that executed the takeover, which met with little resistance. Continue reading

Walter Smith’s Lifelong Fascination with Railroads


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The Historians LogoThis week on “The Historians” podcast, Reverend Walter Smith of Lisbon in northern New York discusses his lifelong fascination with railroads. Reverend Smith writes the “Reminiscing” column in the Bulletin of the Bridge Line Historical Society, a railroad enthusiast publication that emphasizes the history of the Delaware and Hudson Railroad.
Listen to the podcast here.    Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Sullivan County Basketball History: Betting and Borscht


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 Holy Cross (and future Boston Celtics) star Bob Cousy (center) and his Tamarack Lodge.png That peculiar phenomenon known as March Madness will soon be upon us, and with its arrival college basketball will be squarely in the national spotlight.

Time was, of course, that college basketball and the Sullivan County resorts were inseparable, and for years the best basketball players in the world could be found spending their summers playing ball in an informal hotel circuit of Sullivan County, NY. Continue reading

Panel: Journalists to Discuss Free Press, First Amendment


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Women March in Seneca Falls will host a panel discussion of media professionals, “People for Free Press…a First Amendment Right,” on March 25, 2017 at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park. This non-partisan, inclusive event seeks to inform about the U.S. Constitution’s right of a free press. Panelists will focus remarks on the First Amendment right to a free press and their personal/professional experience with efforts in the US to diminish that right. A Q&A will follow the presentations. Continue reading