Category Archives: History

New York History

Governor Martin Glynn Symposium February 18th


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The Irish American Heritage Museum will host a Governor Martin Glynn Symposium on February 18, 2017 from 10 am to 2 pm. The symposium will take a look at New York’s 40th Governor, and its first Irish American Roman Catholic Governor.

The son of Irish immigrants, Glynn attended public school in Kinderhook and graduated from Fordham University in 1894. While serving in the US Congress (1899-1901), he championed the rights of labor, political reform, and religious tolerance. Glynn was as elected lieutenant governor in 1912. Continue reading

Some History of the Famous Red Barn in Keene


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In late December, the rustic red barn that stood at the intersection of Routes 73 and 9N in Keene was taken down by the Department of Environmental Conservation after it became hazardous.

Although not an officially-recognized historic landmark, many who have traveled through Keene saw the barn, with its majestic High Peaks in the background, as a quaint countryside icon.

Since it came down, folks have waxed nostalgic while mourning the abrupt loss of this unassuming structure. I decided to dig into the barn’s history and see if there was more to it than met the eye. Continue reading

Interview: Michael Perazzini, Johnson Hall Historic Site


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Michael Perazzini, Senior Interpreter at Johnson Hall State Historic Site at Johnstown in Fulton County, joined host Jane E. Wilcox on The Forget-Me-Not Hour to talk about the 18th century history of the Mohawk Valley, with a focus on Sir William Johnson’s role in the Mohawk Valley, his Mohawk consort Molly Brant, the Iroquois and early European settlers in the Valley, and their experiences during the American Revolution. The Mohawk Valley’s history during the war was particularly tumultuous. Michael spotlighted what happened to the Loyalists during and after the war as well and talked about what records can help in researching Mohawk Valley Loyalist ancestors during this period. Continue reading

New Book: The Best of New York Archives


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A new book, The Best of New York Archives: Selections from the Magazine, 2001— 2011 (SUNY Press, 2017) is available now for pre-order. The book offers readers a chance to discover or rediscover some of the most popular articles on New York State history from the pages of the award-winning New York Archives magazine.

Articles from Pulitzer Prize winners and best-selling authors tell stories of New York State’s rich history based on research in archival records around the state.

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Two Horrific Events in New York City


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The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, history teacher Doug Kaufman discusses the 1911 Triangle shirtwaist factory fire in New York City. Steve Jankowski of Broadalbin, NY, tells how he escaped from the scene of the 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. They spoke at an event sponsored by Amsterdam Reads on the historical novel “A Fall of Marigolds” by Susan Meissner. Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

French Regiments at Carillon Focus of Fort Ti Talk Sunday


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Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” continues on Sunday, February 12th, at 2 pm with “Vive le Roi! French Regiments at Carillon,” presented by Senior Director of Interpretation, Stuart Lilie.

Most Americans have heard of the Black Watch and Inneskilling Regiments who served the British army at Ticonderoga. Much less well-known are the regimental histories and traditions of the French army.

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New York History Around The Web This Week


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Robert Moses’ Least Controversial Triumph


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robert mosesThe many controversies that surrounded Robert Moses during his long career as New York’s “Master Builder” were sharpened by his long battle with Jane Jacobs and by Robert Caro’s 1974 biography, The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York (1974).

But his least contentious achievements are also the most unknown: the construction of the New York Power Authority’s hydroelectric plants along the St. Lawrence and Niagara Rivers. Continue reading