Category Archives: History

New York History

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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‘Five Formidable Forts’ Tour Set For September


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Crown Point - Photo by John WarrenThe public is invited to take a once-ever packaged tour, on Saturday, September 12, 2015, of Champlain lake shore sites where five military forts were built between 238 and 325 years ago.

Historians will lead guests on a tour of the archaeological sites of two early forts (1660, 1731) at Chimney Point in Addison, Vermont; the ruins of two forts (1734, 1759) in Crown Point, New York; and a Revolution War fort site (1776) in Orwell, Vermont. Continue reading

Bruce Dearstyne: Highlighting Albany’s Heritage


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1024px-North_Pearl_Street_Albany_1800sAlbany is a historic city! Its website includes a history of the city. Kathy Sheehan, campaigning for Mayor in 2012, cited its “deep and palpable history” as one of its assets and one of the bases for its potential development in the future. As Mayor, she initiated the Albany Heritage Tourism Initiative and gave a very impressive talk on “Albany: Our History, Our Future,” emphasizing its potential for heritage tourism at the kick-off luncheon for New York History Month organized by the University Club in November 2014.

One of her key themes was connections — among Albany’s historical buildings, its history organizations such as the Albany Institute of History and Art, and state sites such as the State Museum and Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site. Continue reading

Antique Engine Event at Hanford Mills Museum


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hanaford mills museumAntique tractors, Model A Fords, outboard motors, a 1956 Chevy Belair and a variety of gas and steam-powered engines will be featured at the 32nd Annual Dan Rion Memorial Antique Engine Jamboree and Powerfest at Hanford Mills Museum on Saturday, September 12 from 10 am until 5 pm.

The Museum’s wood-fired steam boiler plant will power horizontal and vertical steam engines. The event also will feature Mill tours, renewable energy exhibits, children’s activities, and live music with the Stoddard Hollow String Band. Continue reading

Champlain Schooner Lois McClure In Shipyard


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LCMM tugboat C L Churchill tows ahead of Lois McClure in windy conditions on Lake ChamplainThe Lake Champlain Maritime Museum’s schooner Lois McClure, in anticipation of her twelfth year of operation, has been taken to the New York State Canal Corporation shipyard at Waterford, NY for a haul-out and hull maintenance. There, a team of shipwrights working with David Short of North Atlantic Shipbuilding and Repair, of West Montville, ME are expected to replace worn, damaged or rotted planking and timbers and recaulk seams. Continue reading

The Vegetarian Crusade: An American Reform Movement


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Adam Shprintzen, Assistant Professor of History at Marywood University and author of The Vegetarian Crusade: The Rise of an American Reform Movement, 1817-1921 (University of North Carolina Press, 2013), takes us on a journey through the origins of vegetarianism and the Vegetarian reform movement in the United States. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/044

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Major Coney Island Exhibit Planned In Brooklyn


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unnamed(1)The spirit of Coney Island will be the focus of Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861-2008, a new exhibit opening at the Brooklyn Museum on November 20, 2015.

The exhibition will trace the evolution of the Coney Island phenomenon from tourist destination during the Civil War to a site of nostalgia. Covering a period of 150 years, the exhibition will feature 140 objects, including paintings, drawings, photographs, prints, posters, artifacts, carousel animals, ephemera, and film clips. Also on view will be Forever Coney, 42 photographs from the Brooklyn Museum collection. Continue reading

Harvest Faire at Crailo State Historic Site


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Crailo Historic SiteOn Saturday, September 12th, Crailo State Historic Site and the Friends of Fort Crailo present a Harvest Faire.

Crailo’s historic grounds and Hudson River park set the scene for the event which features both 17th and 18th century re-enactors, music, and demonstrations, as well as crafts and games for children. Among the re-enactors are 17th-century Dutch settlers, a tinsmith, a doctor and Native Americans. Continue reading

Special Downton Abbey Tours at Staatsburgh


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image003Fans of the popular PBS television series can enjoy a “Downton Abbey experience” at Staatsburgh State Historic Site (also known as Mills Mansion) this fall.

The site will present two different tours that compare Staatsburgh to Downton Abbey. Staatsburgh, the turn-of-the-century home of socialite Ruth Livingston Mills and her husband, industrialist Ogden Mills, was a real-life American version of the British drama. Continue reading

Sullivan County’s Honeymoon Murder


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PittsburghPhilLoch Sheldrake, or Sheldrake Pond, as it was known before many of the ponds in Sullivan County became lakes overnight as part of the late 19th century tourism boom, is one of the deepest bodies of water in the region.

It was a favorite dumping ground for Murder, Inc. when the enforcement arm of organized crime plied its trade in the mountains, and it is believed that at least one of the bodies deposited there has never been found. Continue reading

Gravestone Preservation Workshop in New Paltz


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HHS Burial GroundOn September 19th and 20th, Historic Huguenot Street will host a two-day Gravestone Preservation Workshop in its historic 17th century burial ground led by monuments conservator, preservationist, and teacher Jonathan Appell, founder of the New England Cemetery Service.

The goal of this hands-on training workshop is to educate attendees on the various challenges and techniques of gravestone, monument, and historic stone preservation via an interactive working experience. Continue reading

Schenectady Suds: Historic Stockade Beer Tour


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unnamedThe Schenectady County Historical Society will host walking tours of the Historic Stockade District to examine the history of brewing in the area from the colonial era to today’s craft brew revival.

Each tour begins with a look at the SCHS exhibit Hops & Hogsheads: Beer from Colonial to Craft Brew, and concludes with a tasting and tour at Mad Jack Brewery at the Van Dyck Restaurant and Lounge. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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75-Year-Old History Book Finally Published


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The Historians LogoThis week “The Historians” podcast features an interview with Dave Northrup, editor of the late Hugh Donlon’s book The Mohawk Valley (Mountain Air Books); Donlon wrote the book during the 1930s when he was a reporter and columnist for the Amsterdam Evening Recorder. You can listen here.

“The Historians” podcast is also heard each Monday at 11:30 am and Wednesday at 11 am on RISE, WMHT’s radio service for the blind and print disabled in New York’s Capital Region and Hudson Valley.

“The Historians” podcast is recorded at Dave Greene’s Eastline Studio. You can support this podcast by making a contribution to “The Historians” GoFundMe page: http://www.gofundme.com/TheHistorians

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Alcoholic Insanity in the Early Republic


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How and when did doctors become respected professionals in American society?

The answer lies in early Americans’ fascination with delirium tremens, or alcoholic insanity, and the Temperance Movement of the early-to-mid 19th century.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Matthew Osborn, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and author of Rum Maniacs: Alcoholic Insanity in the Early American Republic (University of Chicago Press, 2014), leads us on an exploration of early American medical history and reform movements. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/043

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